Post a video, entertain me!

farley3k wrote:

Why do People Like Owning a House?

The big thing for us was the stability of monthly payments. It'll change a bit here and there, but our rent was going up 10-20%/year.

For me it was my rent was higher then a mortgage for a bigger place.

So I can change whatever the hell I want without worrying about what the landlord thinks. And we can fix things or get things fixed without waiting on a landlord to arrange it (poorly).

Hmm, ever since my dad changed our living room in the 70's, I've always wanted a room with bright orange walls...

LeapingGnome wrote:

On a whim I rewatched the Matrix a few weeks ago after having not seen it for years. I felt it still held up pretty well. I remember it was the first DVD I ever bought and my favorite movie in my early 20s. Heck it might still be my favorite movie if I had to pick one.

I think the lobby fight scene is the one bit that does not hold up in The Matrix. Visually it's still spectacular, and the choreography is dope, but...there's there this bit in Mission Impossible 2 (which is a much, *much* worse movie overall) where a McGuffin is in a tall building, and the villain sneeringly deconstructs Ethan Hunt's MO - Ethan will do some dumb, insane stunt that puts him at insane risk rather than kill a hapless security guard.

And the dumb, life-threatening stunt is done while the villain just kills his way from the lobby on up - and you compare the two action scenes and you realize the dope lobby action scene is actually morally heinous.

Alien Love Gardener wrote:

And the dumb, life-threatening stunt is done while the villain just kills his way from the lobby on up - and you compare the two action scenes and you realize the dope lobby action scene is actually morally heinous.

Each Agent "killed" in the Matrix is an innocent person who is also dead, as the Agents take them over to do anything. Just Trinity running away has a pretty significant body count as I remember.

bnpederson wrote:
Alien Love Gardener wrote:

And the dumb, life-threatening stunt is done while the villain just kills his way from the lobby on up - and you compare the two action scenes and you realize the dope lobby action scene is actually morally heinous.

Each Agent "killed" in the Matrix is an innocent person who is also dead, as the Agents take them over to do anything. Just Trinity running away has a pretty significant body count as I remember.

Sure, but that's self-preservation. It's not Trinity's fault that the agents treat people as flesh-suits. Going in brutally through the lobby as they do is a *choice* to not regard people as anything other than flesh-suits for the sake of a badass action scene, and it's nasty.

Alien Love Gardener wrote:
bnpederson wrote:
Alien Love Gardener wrote:

And the dumb, life-threatening stunt is done while the villain just kills his way from the lobby on up - and you compare the two action scenes and you realize the dope lobby action scene is actually morally heinous.

Each Agent "killed" in the Matrix is an innocent person who is also dead, as the Agents take them over to do anything. Just Trinity running away has a pretty significant body count as I remember.

Sure, but that's self-preservation. It's not Trinity's fault that the agents treat people as flesh-suits. Going in brutally through the lobby as they do is a *choice* to not regard people as anything other than flesh-suits for the sake of a badass action scene, and it's nasty.

I'm confused. Are you saying the scene is morally heinous in-story or that it was morally heinous to film and promote the scene as part of a movie in the real world?

Because in-story, as I remember, they're trying to rescue their comrade, Morpheus. The security guards and police involved were adversarial to them, as they (and the government) were being manipulated by Agents. Neo and Trinity were under a time constraint (to stop the interrogation) and had just had most of their crew killed, so I presume that was the plan they thought would work.

So from that, in-story, perspective critiquing Neo and Trinity for not coming up with a plan that involves less of a body count because of something that was done in a wholly different movie franchise doesn't make sense to me.

On the other hand, if you're critiquing the Wachowskis for writing and filming the scene, fair enough. But what, exactly, are you critical of? Is it showing the protagonists gunning down the security guards before they had a chance to know what was going on? The gun fetishism? The lack of remorse afterwards?

Thank this is fun but i cringe to think what would happen in the opposite direction...

I love the Italian pronunciation of "lettuce"

bnpederson wrote:
Alien Love Gardener wrote:
bnpederson wrote:
Alien Love Gardener wrote:

And the dumb, life-threatening stunt is done while the villain just kills his way from the lobby on up - and you compare the two action scenes and you realize the dope lobby action scene is actually morally heinous.

Each Agent "killed" in the Matrix is an innocent person who is also dead, as the Agents take them over to do anything. Just Trinity running away has a pretty significant body count as I remember.

Sure, but that's self-preservation. It's not Trinity's fault that the agents treat people as flesh-suits. Going in brutally through the lobby as they do is a *choice* to not regard people as anything other than flesh-suits for the sake of a badass action scene, and it's nasty.

I'm confused. Are you saying the scene is morally heinous in-story or that it was morally heinous to film and promote the scene as part of a movie in the real world?

Because in-story, as I remember, they're trying to rescue their comrade, Morpheus. The security guards and police involved were adversarial to them, as they (and the government) were being manipulated by Agents. Neo and Trinity were under a time constraint (to stop the interrogation) and had just had most of their crew killed, so I presume that was the plan they thought would work.

So from that, in-story, perspective critiquing Neo and Trinity for not coming up with a plan that involves less of a body count because of something that was done in a wholly different movie franchise doesn't make sense to me.

On the other hand, if you're critiquing the Wachowskis for writing and filming the scene, fair enough. But what, exactly, are you critical of? Is it showing the protagonists gunning down the security guards before they had a chance to know what was going on? The gun fetishism? The lack of remorse afterwards?

I'm critiquing the movie for having the protagonists make a choice to save their comrade in a way that cares nothing for collateral damage. Despite the movie establishing that a death in the matrix means death in the real world, there's no notion that they care a whit for those prisoners of the matrix, and the scene's constructed in such a way to get us hootin' and hollerin' for the display of skill and power as the ignorant bystanders get gunned down.

I think it's pretty f*cked up.

Well, I certainly did not mean to set off so much hubbub about The Matrix lobby scene. The point of the Movies with Mikey video is to show how the Wachowski's films, particularly The Matrix, include some powerful allegory for issues trans people live with, and I had never looked at the movies through that... lens (ahem, sorry) before.


On a lighter note, this was fun (starts at 5:10):

But Moss is no Bryce Dallas Howard:

And now, just to mess with your YouTube recommendations...
(oh, you'll want sound for this one, just a song, but WHAT a song!)

Tucker Carlson Crusades Against The ‘Creepy’ Metric System.

I don't even know where to begin with that mad exchange.

BadKen wrote:

I don't even know where to begin with that mad exchange.

I think we need to handle it Superman IV style.... toss them both into the sun

Floating an Anvil on Liquid Mercury

Honest Trailers | Captain Marvel

Why Chernobyl Exploded - The Real Physics Behind The Reactor

That was super powerful.

Not sure how many people here are musical lovers, but man this is so fun I can't stop smiling:

Here's what a knowledgeable music lover I am: partway through I idly wondered "I wonder if he's related to Cole Porter?"

Young Bradley Whitford Got a Great Tip from Mark Hamill

Always a fave to watch

75 000 h.p. The Biggest Nuclear Icebreaker

Chernobyl documentary footage vs. scenes from the show

NSMike wrote:

Full Jon Stewart speech transcript

​I want to thank Mr​.​ Collins and Mr. Nadler for putting this together​. But as I sit here today, I can’t help but think what an incredible metaphor this room is for the entire process that getting health care benefits for 9/11 first​ responders has come to. Behind me, a filled room of 9/11 first​ responders and in front of me, a nearly empty ​Congress.

Sick and dying, they brought themselves down here to speak to no one. Shameful. It’s an embarrassment to the country and it’s a stain on this institution. And you should be ashamed of yourselves for those that aren’t here. But you won’t be because accountability doesn’t appear to be something that occurs in this chamber.
We don’t want to be here. Lou ​(Alvarez) ​doesn’t want to be here. None of these people want to be here. But they are, and they’re not here for themselves. They’re here to continue fighting for what’s right.

Lou’s going to go back for his 69th chemo. The great Ray Pfeifer would come down here, his body riddled with cancer and pain, where he couldn’t walk, and the disrespect shown to him and to the other lobbyists on this bill is utterly unacceptable.

Y​ou know, I would be so angry at the latest injustice that’s been done to these men and women. Another business card thrown our way as a way of shooing us away like children trick-or-treating rather than the heroes that they are and will always be. Ray would say, “Calm down​,​ Jonny, calm down. I got all the cards I need.” And he would tap his pocket where he kept prayer cards. Three hundred forty-three firefighters.

The official FDNY response time to 9/11 was ​five seconds. ​Five seconds. That’s how long it took for FDNY, for NYPD, for Port Authority, EMS to respond to an urgent need from the public. ​Five seconds. Hundreds died in an instant. Thousands more poured in to continue to fight for their brothers and sisters.

The breathing problems started almost immediately and they were told they weren’t sick, they were crazy. And then, as the illnesses got worse, and things became more apparent, “​W​ell​,​ okay, you’re sick​,​ but it’s not from the pile.” And then when the science became irrefutable, “​O​kay, it’s the pile, but this is a New York issue. I don’t know if we have the money.”

And I’m sorry if I sound angry and undiplomatic. But I’m angry, and you should be too, and they’re all angry as well and they have every justification to be that way. There is not a person here, there is not an empty chair on that stage that didn’t tweet out “Never Forget the heroes of 9/11. Never forget their bravery. Never forget what they did, what they gave to this country.” Well, here they are. And where are they? And it would be one thing if their callous indifference and rank hypocrisy were benign, but it’s not. Your indifference cost these men and women their most valuable commodity: time. It’s the one thing they’re running out of.

This should be flipped, this hearing should be flipped. These men and women should be up on that stage and Congress should be down here answering their questions as to why this is so damn hard and takes so damn long​,​ and why no matter what they get, something’s always pulled back and they gotta come back.

Mr. ​(Mike) ​Johnson​ (R-La.)​, you made a point earlier and it is one we’ve heard over and over again in these halls, and I couldn’t help but to answer ​i​t​,​ which was you guys are obviously heroes and 9/11 was a big deal but we have a lot of stuff here to do and we’ve got to make sure there’s money for a variety of disasters, hurricanes and tornadoes​. But this wasn’t a hurricane. And this wasn’t a tornado, and by the way, that’s your job anyway. We can’t fund these programs. You can.

Setting aside that​,​ no American in this country should face financial ruin because of a health issue. Certainly 9/11 first​ ​responders shouldn’t decide whether to live or to have a place to live. And the idea that you can give them only ​five more years of the VCF because you’re not quite sure what’s gonna happen ​five years from now​. Well, I can tell you, I’m pretty sure what’s going to happen ​five years from now. More of these men and women are going to get sick and they are going to die. And I am awfully tired of hearing that it’s a 9/11 New York issue. Al Qaeda didn’t shout “Death to Tribeca.” They attacked ​America​,​ and these men and women and their response to it is what brought our country back. It’s what gave a reeling nation a solid foundation to stand back upon. To remind us of why this country is great, of why this country is worth fighting for.

And you are ignoring them. You can end it tomorrow. Why this bill isn’t unanimous consent and a standalone issue is beyond my comprehension​, and I’ve yet to hear a reasonable explanation for why it’ll get stuck in some transportation bill or some appropriations bill and get sent over to the Senate, where a certain someone from the ​Senate will use it as a political football to get themselves maybe another new import tax on petroleum, because that’s what happened to us in 2015.

And we won’t allow it to happen again. Thank God for people like John Feals, thank God for people like Ray Pfeifer, thank God for all these people who will not let it happen. They responded in ​five seconds. They did their jobs with courage, grace, tenacity, humility. ​Eighteen years later, do yours. Thank you.

And then after the backlash aimed at them they passed the bill the next day. Representation Democracy is looking like a worse and worse system every day.

I'll be honest. "Sick and dying they brought themselves down here to speak to no one." That got to me.