Game Dev Tycoon: The Game Thread

Well, he is in the 30th year. A company that lasts that long in game as well as real life better be able to make one of those every so often.

.....so, Ipad please? I don't like gaming on PC unless it really needs the hardware, you know? I'm a couch gamer nowadays. Please let them know if you agree.

Ducats, OG. You'd have been swimming in ducats.

Robear wrote:

Ducats, OG. You'd have been swimming in ducats.

No wonder I went bankrupt. My accounting department messed up the currency conversion!

Ok, I just completed my first game. I survived about 11 years. I only used two engines: K1 that had low quality 2D graphics, etc., and K2 which had 2D graphics V3, stereo sound, advanced AI, etc.--the works! I had had a few games that sold 1-2.5 million but most were only modest successes or modest failures. I was making game after game for either PC or PlaySystem, depending on genre, with K2, but eventually I think the market fell out under me and my high-quality 2D games...I never upgraded at all to 3D so even when I had hired two other employees, and used them at full rest, and made games with good design and tech scores, the review scores kept dropping, and therefore sales. Is it absolutely necessary to go to 3D? I'd like not to at all. Also, please explain the advantages of doing Medium instead of Small games. I only did a couple of Mediums and they didn't seem to be worth the extra expense.

Also, your own character gets paid 6k/month even at the start. What's he eating? How much rent does he pay for that garage?

Keithustus wrote:

Is it absolutely necessary to go to 3D? I'd like not to at all. Also, please explain the advantages of doing Medium instead of Small games. I only did a couple of Mediums and they didn't seem to be worth the extra expense.

I think it's pretty much required that you add 3D to your game engine, much like the graphics war that happened in the real world. There's six different levels of 3D tech you can research so you pretty much always have to be investing in your engine. I know early on I was cranking out a new game engine every couple of years to keep up with the changing tech (I think I ended up with about 12 or 13 different engines by Year 30) and I noticed that my game scores would decline if the engine got long in the tooth (some of the reviews would make subtle jabs at my tech).

As for the differences between Small and Medium games, the wiki says that it's harder for the Small games to get 10s in reviews. I also noticed that there was a big difference in the amount of sales that the games would generate. A smash hit with a Small game might bring in a couple million, but a smash hit with a Medium game could easily net $10 million+.

I'd always look back through Game History to try to figure out what type of Small game made me money and got me fans and then make a similar Medium one. Or, once I researched researched Sequels, I'd crank out a Medium sequel. That seemed to work for me...except for Cyber Cypher II, which got a lovely rating of 2.5.

Keithustus wrote:

Also, your own character gets paid 6k/month even at the start. What's he eating? How much rent does he pay for that garage?

I almost choked when I saw I'd have to pay something like $43k/month for my first employee.

Until very recently, I totally didn't know that there was a 'sequels' research topic. I was making my own! Starting with 'Laser Commander', a text based sci-fi RPG, right up to Laser Commander 4, simply by naming them so. Ah well, you live and learn!

Question on the dev bars: If you put all three bars at the top of their line, then obviously time is spread equally across all three, but is it more time spent? I think there's still some basics I need to get right in my mind.

omnipherous wrote:

Until very recently, I totally didn't know that there was a 'sequels' research topic. I was making my own! Starting with 'Laser Commander', a text based sci-fi RPG, right up to Laser Commander 4, simply by naming them so. Ah well, you live and learn!

Question on the dev bars: If you put all three bars at the top of their line, then obviously time is spread equally across all three, but is it more time spent? I think there's still some basics I need to get right in my mind.

No, the top three bars are just for you to manipulate as you are comfortable with. All game mechanics are decided by the horizontal bar that includes all three components.

So I guess it's just a way to really push a large difference between sections. Thanks.

In my latest playthrough, I got to 'the end', but it seems like I was stuck in the first office after the garage for a really long time, even though I had oodles and oodles of money (>$50M), which completely fouled me up for the later game; I couldn't use the research lab in time to buy research points.

Does anyone know what the actual trigger is, to move from the first upgrade to the second? And I gather there's even a third upgrade? I had money stacked to the gorram moon (>$300M at one point) and never got an option to upgrade further.

Woa, this page helps, maybe too much.

omnipherous wrote:

So I guess it's just a way to really push a large difference between sections. Thanks.

It becomes a juggling act later on when you build more advanced features into your engine. You'll have to allocate more time to Sound if you want an orchestral soundtrack, surround sound, etc. than if you simply chose basic sounds. That's the primary motivation for me to make bigger games. More time means I can pack in more features. You'll find that the higher the appropriate skills (design for gameplay for example), the less time you need to spend to get all the features in. Later on you can train someone to be a specialist (e.g., a Gameplay specialist) that also affects how much you can put in. I'm guessing that when you get to the AAA level you'll need specialists for most categories to have any shot at getting enough features into a game to get good scores.

Alright, what are some good strategies for stage 2 (small office)? Here's what doesn't work:

1) spend 100k+ to recruit a level 2-4 technologist or demo creator, then bleed either for massive amounts of research and tech points as you create decent game after decent game. Eventually their already-high salary becomes too much and you never have enough to upgrade your engine, so reviews slowly drop, and you go bankrupt.

2) spend 10k to hire a level-1 guy, or two, and train yourself while you have them do all the research. Once they level up a couple times, fire and rehire cheaper coders. This strategy results in games, even small ones, in which making them essentially by yourself results in too low of T/D scores to be reviewed well, and despite keeping costs down, the office's rent isn't cheap.

What I'm thinking of trying next is to hire 1-2 cheap employees, one design specialist and one technology specialist, and slowly train them up at speed and research, and hope I can upgrade my engine more quickly than their pay increases.

Btw: I have found that TES action games and then Gameling RPGs work pretty well in stage 2 until the gen-3 systems come out, just change the subject each time and keep cranking them out.

Should you even hire anyone right away, or just keep doing small games yourself as you train yourself? I tried that for awhile but the research points come so slowly without any other employees.

Final link: here is an indy-dev forum where the Game Dev Tycoon creators asked for some input on their game ideas, months before they formed Greenheart Games. Interesting read.

Does anyone else fear head scratches in the early game like I do? Almost went bankrupt doing a couple contracts where my dude scratched his head with 1 point to go...

Finally got through a 30 year game. Top of the line 2D game dev if you ask me. I didn't brake into the big time until the last two or three years and I attribute that to a lack of research points. I couldn't fund the research lab until it was too little too late, but maybe my next go I will get a few more hits.

So, I already played a lot of Game Dev Story on my phone. I am kind of curious what this option gives me?

Findaer wrote:

Does anyone else fear head scratches in the early game like I do? Almost went bankrupt doing a couple contracts where my dude scratched his head with 1 point to go...

Finally got through a 30 year game. Top of the line 2D game dev if you ask me. I didn't brake into the big time until the last two or three years and I attribute that to a lack of research points. I couldn't fund the research lab until it was too little too late, but maybe my next go I will get a few more hits.

Yeah, it happens. Sometimes the guy just gets stumped.

But you know what? What I most value from contracts are the research points. Unless I'm a hair's breadth from bankruptcy, of course.

My text adventure game was not well-received.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/rX7RPpe.jpg)

Shipwrecked was shipwrecked?

Sadly, not the worst game I've released. :/

This game is super tricky, which I really enjoy.

Oddly enough, My Army 1-4 was a HUGELY popular series for Sage Bear...

Pity nothing else was.

The publisher contracts really get a massive increase in sales, but the money coming in is not so great.

My first completion.
IMAGE(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7303/8716358562_e49d54b893_z.jpg)

I was happy to see the game thread with more posts than the controversy thread for once

I think my hints on mid game above are still relevant - boosts are the biggest deal, followed by the research lab. Without them, you can't make decent games or keep up with the demands of your fans respectively.

Yea, it took several tries, as I complained about above, but I finally broke through the first office, and just before the game ended I decided to go to the larger office. I win!

IMAGE(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7377/8716856144_e165c5274f_c.jpg)

Here's my biggest game before the game ended:

IMAGE(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7376/8715736619_5ff064a678_c.jpg)

Now as to how, I just came across an excellent post on the wikia page that was written by someone who seems to confirm quite a few of the things that I suspect will work well. I have added some bold to what I found to be most helpful to finally surviving:

After playing this since the day after release, and following this ever changing wiki page closely, I've noticed that the your MAIN goal in getting good reviews is the ratios between your tech and design. For all the people only worrying about the sliders and trying to put them in the perfect spot for that 10 game, you're stressing yourself out. You need to learn that each slider (Gameplay, A.I., Level Design, World Design, etc.) is either a design factor, or a tech factor in your game. To figure out what factor they are is common sense to me, Level DESIGN is a design factor, go figure. Also, if you've read this page you'd already know that the slider is determing the amount of time you spent on that aspect of your game and you should really be paying attention to the bar at the bottom and not the sliders themselves. So now you understand each slider and if its going to add either design, or tech to your game, now you need to understand the ratio for each genre.

Page to Find Ratios:

http://gamedevtycoon.wikia.com/wiki/...

After reviewing the page you should notice that the ratios aren't far off from being 60% - 40% in every game, except Adventure which is 70-30 and Casual which is slightly different than Adventure. So now you just need to remember which is the dominate stat, either tech or design.

Now you know that each slider effects either design or tech, and each genre of game needs either design, or tech to be dominate, line up your sliders accordingly. If during your development process you find that your dominate stat is slacking, cut down on other stat during the next stage. Now it is important to remember that each genre also needs certain sliders to be more than 40% (of the bar at the bottom) twice during a game development. If you've read this page, then you should already know this. This is a common sense factor to me as well, RPG needs dialogue and world design? Who would have guessed?

Now you understand everything about the sliders, and where they should go depending on what genre of game you're making, now you need to understand the importance of game engines (at least in my experiences). Game engine features give a boost (to my understanding) to the stat it belongs to. For exmaple, A.I. companions would boost tech, and better dialogues would boost design. Now before you go making game engines with every feature you have, hear me out.

Your game engine features are basically the only "different" thing you can add to each game. Because of that, the game holds you to a standard when you make games with features. Knowing that information, you need to make game engines adding one feature at a time. Yeah, I know realistically it's the best thing in the world when a game comes out with 10 new features, however, when you do that the game expects even newer things with the next game release. Now, I see that the main complaint about game engines is that you don't have the ability to "edit" the previous engine therefore making you purchase a brand new engine even to add one new feature, which could be expensive. Here's how I do my game engines, I only make 2 different types of game engines, design and tech. Each game engine has features that ONLY benefit the stat that it's titled. For example, my design engine would ONLY include features that boost design (open world, better dialogue, etc), and vice versa for my Tech engine. To avoid confusion during gameplay, I only research one new thing every time I'm about to make a new engine (after every game eventually), therefore I know what I've already used in my engines and what I haven't. If you only include the features that boost the stat you're looking for, making game engines really isn't that expensive. I know when I first started playing I would make game engines that had every feature I had, and if I didn't need something I'd just uncheck it. Bad. Everytime you get a new feature, make a new engine, New feature and a new engine really help reviews.

A couple tips to remember, stay in the garage until you get about 6-7 million dollars. Gives you more money to mess up (if needed). As soon as you move out of the garage do nothing but publisher contracts until you hit 100k fans. I know it might not be something you want to do, but thats life, and you'll stay succesful even with bad games. The publishers sell so many copies that you'll be profiting even off a 5 game. Another important tip is to ALWAYS train after every game once you get in the office and get crew. As soon as I moved into the office I hired 3 people, one had lots of tech, one had lots of design, and one was in the middle like your main character. Having 3 people and developing nothing but publisher games should keep you afloat quite well and easily. So all in all, know the stat for each slider, know the ratio for each genre, put the sliders accordingly, SLOWLY research, (it doesn't benefit you to get 3 new features at once, it just adds confusion when making game engines), add one NEW feature at a time when making game engines, and always train yourself and crew (once you can).

That said, I still suffered from the "everything engine" problem, and only upgraded them sporadically, whereas I did train my employees very often. In my next run, I think I'll pick one or two genres and stick with them for most of the game, and carefully craft engines and my research topics specifically for them. No sense researching Reactive Quests (150 RP) and spending the money to add them to an engine that will be used for action games, for instance.

. . . . . .

Regarding 2D v. 3D....the highest-level 2D engines (V4 and V5) counts as Tech Level 3 when the review score is computed, the same as a 3D engine V3. So you can raise your game's Tech Level as high as Tech Level 7 by switching to 3D. I took several years of research and wasted engines and games built just to unlock the graphics research and NOT to be released--costing me tens of millions of dollars--to change from making 2D V5 engines to 3D engines with higher Tech Levels. So go 3D once it appears to be spared of that expensive endeavor.

. . . . . .

Is there a way to save the final screen's stats? The game posts the high-score to a list, but can I keep the other stats in some way other than screen captures?

Latest game.
IMAGE(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7452/8718912848_d4b5e2b4ac_c.jpg)

Jolly Rogering? I'm thinking, Pirate Romance?

It's a Pirate Adventure.

As I posted previously, I enjoyed the demo. I was on the fence about buying the full game, thinking it might be little more than repetition of what's in the demo, but after watching a couple people playing the game on Twitch, I decided to buy the full game.

One thing that frustrated me during the demo is that no matter how many times you turned off the music in settings, it would turn itself back on after about 30 seconds. At the time, I just chalked it up as being a bug in the demo. I'm now playing the retail version of the game and, thankfully, that specific issue doesn't happen, but there is another issue that's almost as frustrating. The game doesn't save your settings between play sessions. So every time I launch the game, I have to go back into settings to turn off the music and disable full-screen. Surely this is not just happening to me. Does anyone know of a way to force the game to save settings when you exit? I looked in the game's folder and didn't see any .ini files.

Oh, and the issue in the demo where sometimes button clicks don't register is still present in the retail version. /sigh

Despite all that, I'm enjoying the game and plan to complete at least one 30-year playthrough. Non-saving settings be damned!

It's not just happening to you. The game doesn't remember my settings either. Kind of ironic for a game about game development?

My audio still turns the music back on.

Oh, there's an update, version 1.3.8 whereas I have 1.3.3. They didn't email me or anything, nor do I see an update log easily accessible on the game's main page. Must go complain on their forums.

So updating my version....will I lose progress?

edit: Whew. Looks like everything is okay. I backed up my savegame data just in case. Btw, those files are located on Windows 7 machines at C:\Users\username\AppData\Local\Game Dev Tycoon\Cache

Where did you get the update from? I can only seem to find where to buy the game again.... (admittedly, it was a very brief search as I get started at work...)

Also, can you only have one save game?

There are three savegame slots, but you can't seem to hop between them as in most games, so think of them as three different games' quicksaves. I still can't find where on the site they notify about patches, but getting the updated version is always easy: open your purchase email and go back to the same download page you used before.

edit: Okay, found the changelog.