The thread for movies that aren't going to get their own thread but are still in theaters

Nevin73 wrote:

Spoiler question:

Spoiler:

I don't really get/remember why Paul goes on a jihad. I mean, he's already emperor and it didn't seem like a lot of rebellion was going on.

edit: I spoilered my question because it gives away a lot of the ending of the 2nd part of the book/movie and subsequent chapters.

He doesn't it happens out of his control. He actual is upset about it. This is one of the reasons he
major spoiler

Spoiler:

fakes his death.

Nevin73 wrote:

Spoiler question:

Spoiler:

I don't really get/remember why Paul goes on a jihad. I mean, he's already emperor and it didn't seem like a lot of rebellion was going on.

edit: I spoilered my question because it gives away a lot of the ending of the 2nd part of the book/movie and subsequent chapters.

Spoiler:

Paul doesn't go on a jihad. The Fremen do.

And the Fremen do so because they saw Paul as the Lisan al Gaib--The Voice from the Outer World--their prophet and messiah rolled up into one. Paul's victory over the Emperor on Dune is seen by the Fremen as proof that their religious prophecy (which was formed and cultivated by the Bene Gesserit) was true. The jihad was just them bringing that truth to the rest of the Known Universe.

Paul through his prescient powers comes to realize that Muad'Dib's Jihad--even with its high body count--is the least damaging near-term future for humanity and that the enforced homogeneity of the post-jihad empire is essential to get humanity started on The Golden Path.

The Dune Encyclopedia gives additional justification for the jihad, saying that the houses of the Landsraad (along with the Bene Gesserit who were pissed their Kwisatz Haderach was pre-empted and turned against them) rose up against Paul. The jihad was seen as retribution for that treachery.

OG_slinger wrote:
Nevin73 wrote:

Spoiler question:

Spoiler:

I don't really get/remember why Paul goes on a jihad. I mean, he's already emperor and it didn't seem like a lot of rebellion was going on.

edit: I spoilered my question because it gives away a lot of the ending of the 2nd part of the book/movie and subsequent chapters.

Spoiler:

Paul doesn't go on a jihad. The Fremen do.

And the Fremen do so because they saw Paul as the Lisan al Gaib--The Voice from the Outer World--their prophet and messiah rolled up into one. Paul's victory over the Emperor on Dune is seen by the Fremen as proof that their religious prophecy (which was formed and cultivated by the Bene Gesserit) was true. The jihad was just them bringing that truth to the rest of the Known Universe.

Paul through his prescient powers comes to realize that Muad'Dib's Jihad--even with its high body count--is the least damaging near-term future for humanity and that the enforced homogeneity of the post-jihad empire is essential to get humanity started on The Golden Path.

The Dune Encyclopedia gives additional justification for the jihad, saying that the houses of the Landsraad (along with the Bene Gesserit who were pissed their Kwisatz Haderach was pre-empted and turned against them) rose up against Paul. The jihad was seen as retribution for that treachery.

It would be nice if any of this were established in the story proper instead of only in supplemental materials or retroactively by sequels.

hbi2k wrote:
OG_slinger wrote:
Nevin73 wrote:

Spoiler question:

Spoiler:

I don't really get/remember why Paul goes on a jihad. I mean, he's already emperor and it didn't seem like a lot of rebellion was going on.

edit: I spoilered my question because it gives away a lot of the ending of the 2nd part of the book/movie and subsequent chapters.

Spoiler:

Paul doesn't go on a jihad. The Fremen do.

And the Fremen do so because they saw Paul as the Lisan al Gaib--The Voice from the Outer World--their prophet and messiah rolled up into one. Paul's victory over the Emperor on Dune is seen by the Fremen as proof that their religious prophecy (which was formed and cultivated by the Bene Gesserit) was true. The jihad was just them bringing that truth to the rest of the Known Universe.

Paul through his prescient powers comes to realize that Muad'Dib's Jihad--even with its high body count--is the least damaging near-term future for humanity and that the enforced homogeneity of the post-jihad empire is essential to get humanity started on The Golden Path.

The Dune Encyclopedia gives additional justification for the jihad, saying that the houses of the Landsraad (along with the Bene Gesserit who were pissed their Kwisatz Haderach was pre-empted and turned against them) rose up against Paul. The jihad was seen as retribution for that treachery.

It would be nice if any of this were established in the story proper instead of only in supplemental materials or retroactively by sequels.

If they did establish it it wouldn't be in the first movie it would be in the 5th or 6th if they do three movies per book.

Watched Dune last night. Loved it, although a more exciting colour palette would have been nice.

I read most of the books as a teen, some Brian Herbert books about 15 years ago (yes I know) and the miniseries when it came out. My wife has seen the Lynch movie.

Liked that they didn't feel the need to explain everything.

Minor bummers...

Spoiler:

Some reference to lack of computers may have been cool, and I'd have liked to see a Navigator.

I now want to go back and watch the Lynch movie and the miniseries

Is it just me or is anyone else getting the desire to replay Dune II after watching the movie?

RawkGWJ wrote:
Eleima wrote:

Dune was freaking amazing and I just might go see it a second time in theaters. Which I haven’t done since Titanic and that was under duress.

I’ve never read the novel. Do you think I’d enjoy the film?

you can absolutely skip the book, as long as you play Dune 2
IMAGE(https://media.giphy.com/media/7FIwzio9Qag4dcfMRz/giphy.gif)

Spoiler:

no, not really

Nevin73 wrote:

Is it just me or is anyone else getting the desire to replay Dune II after watching the movie?

the feeling never really goes away. It just re-awakens and re-surfaces from time to time.

Oh yeah, and not too far off either.

The Entire History Of Dune's House Atreides Explained

Hobbes2099 wrote:

you can absolutely skip the book, as long as you play Dune 2
IMAGE(https://media.giphy.com/media/7FIwzio9Qag4dcfMRz/giphy.gif).

I’d much rather (and already did back in July) play the first Dune game.

MrDeVil909 wrote:

Watched Dune last night. Loved it, although a more exciting colour palette would have been nice.

I’m curious. What were you hoping for because what we fit was extremely close to what descriptions we have in the book.

Oh and he sure to rewatch both miniseries, because one was better than the other.

Eleima wrote:
MrDeVil909 wrote:

Watched Dune last night. Loved it, although a more exciting colour palette would have been nice.

I’m curious. What were you hoping for because what we fit was extremely close to what descriptions we have in the book.

This is pretty subjective, but for me, it was the choice to have an overall dark muted look to the movie that was a little disappointing. Spoiling for images (hopefully they load properly):

Spoiler:

On Caladan, they focused on all the water everywhere, but they did the color grading in such a way that everything was really dark and flat. There's lots of vegetation in the image below, but they tuned the color to just blend into everything else. You don't feel like you're on a lush world, just a wet one.
IMAGE(https://reelsteelsheffield.files.wordpress.com/2021/10/dune-1.jpg)

One of the few real pops of color is the ecological testing station's lab where they show the green plants. They dialed the color up a lot there to show how unusual and important those are to the Fremen.

Similarly to Caladan, when Paul and Jessica reach the rocks and the sandworm looms overhead, it looked like everything was cast in a dark shadow, and it was difficult to see the detail in the scene.

Compare the promo image with how it actually appeared in the film:
IMAGE(https://imgix.bustle.com/uploads/image/2021/10/13/6c2d7b27-78ad-4aa6-8250-822ae92e5d8a-new-sandworm-dune-copy.jpg)
IMAGE(https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/JjKlwvxL83r21m4PoO-mGFqpzlQ=/0x0:1423x596/1200x800/filters:focal(599x185:825x411)/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/67376508/Screen_Shot_2020_09_09_at_12.21.44_PM.0.png)

Blade Runner 2049 had a more varied color palatte, so I was sort of hoping for something similar here, at least in the first half of the movie. I still really enjoyed the visuals and overall vibe, so it's not something that ruined it for me, just a personal preference.

Eleima wrote:
MrDeVil909 wrote:

Watched Dune last night. Loved it, although a more exciting colour palette would have been nice.

I’m curious. What were you hoping for because what we fit was extremely close to what descriptions we have in the book.

It's been a very long time, but to beanman's point.

Spoiler:

Calladan specifically seemed in my memory to be a paradise planet, here it looked so dreary.

It could be a creative decision of course. Reflective of the family's impending doom, Paul maybe not wanting to leave his home etc but it looked very uninviting. It looked like a place it would have been a joy to leave.

When they showed Giedi Prime later it looked and felt like the same planet

Maybe just a different colour grading would have had an impact.

But to be clear, that's a really minor factor and didn't impact my enjoyment.

Eleima wrote:

Oh and he sure to rewatch both miniseries, because one was better than the other. :D

Do you mean Children of Dune? I honestly didn't even know about that, that's a nice surprise. Or is there a different one? I can't find on a quick Google.

[quote="MrDeVil909"]

MrDeVil909 wrote:
Spoiler:

Calladan specifically seemed in my memory to be a paradise planet, here it looked so dreary.

It could be a creative decision of course. Reflective of the family's impending doom, Paul maybe not wanting to leave his home etc but it looked very uninviting. It looked like a place it would have been a joy to leave.

When they showed Giedi Prime later it looked and felt like the same planet

Maybe just a different colour grading would have had an impact.

But to be clear, that's a really minor factor and didn't impact my enjoyment.

Eleima wrote:

Oh and he sure to rewatch both miniseries, because one was better than the other. :D

Do you mean Children of Dune? I honestly didn't even know about that, that's a nice surprise. Or is there a different one? I can't find on a quick Google.

Spoiler:

Compared to Dune it is. Personally I always considered it a planet equivalent to Wales.

The Syfy shows are exceptionally faithful to the books and worth checking out due to that, but suffer from bad acting and production values

I don’t remember Caladan being described as lush, just… wet (although the wiki does say “lush” and I don’t have my Encyclopedia to check). And it looked a lot like some shores in France, specifically Brittany, which is the region of France that most people think gets the most rain (it actually doesn’t, it’s just a stereotype). I wonder if that was an inspiration. And the place kinda looks like Wales, as Ranalin said. Doesn’t feel dreary at all to me but maybe it’s a cultural thing?

And yes, I meant Children of Dune, it’s well worth watching, I have so much praise for Jessica Brooks and James McAvoy as the twins.

My favorite thing about the modern Dune is remembering how weird things get in the later books and imagining them filming *those* stories.

Caladan's PNW vibes looked quite like paradise to me. Perpetual Awesome Coat weather? Sounds great.

Caladan looked like Scotland to me

I enjoyed Dune. Good acting and some incredibly epic sets and set pieces. I think, without exposition, you still get a sense of the odd/religious vibes that dip into the lore and starts the world building, The mentats, the doctors, the ceremonies of the Bene Gesserit and the Sardaukar - they all show the tip of a deep lore. Not sure why this gets the movie dinged when most initial movies usually don't 100% their lore explanations right off the bat.

I really enjoyed the scale of the ships and the battles with them. I wonder how the Harkonnen plan on rebuilding the facilities quickly after some of those strikes!

I think the movie also really shows off the "staleness" of the current state of humanity. The movie is set in the year 10191. Interstellar travel, giant ships, etc yet humanity still locked in the same political type battles that we have today.

I do feel like I'll enjoy a bit of research into some of the questions the movie brings - like why human computers? I actually never thought of that question until it was brought up here!

karmajay wrote:

I do feel like I'll enjoy a bit of research into some of the questions the movie brings - like why human computers?

Because the Orange Catholic Bible says so. Duh.

I also recommend watching Quinn's videos. They're well done and he covers the breadth of Dune as well as other SciFi books and themes.

Quinn is tha bomb!

karmajay wrote:

I really enjoyed the scale of the ships and the battles with them. I wonder how the Harkonnen plan on rebuilding the facilities quickly after some of those strikes!

I think the movie also really shows off the "staleness" of the current state of humanity. The movie is set in the year 10191. Interstellar travel, giant ships, etc yet humanity still locked in the same political type battles that we have today.

Spoiler:

The Harkonnen facilities are fine because they based their operations out of a different city altogether.

The Atreides picked the ancient imperial city of Arrakeen because it was easier to defend and they figured it would have less Harkonnen agents running about.

As far as "staleness" goes the date is 10191, but that's according to the Universal Standard Calendar. The event that calendar is based on is the founding of the Spacing Guild, not the death of Jesus (BG--Before Guild, AG--After Guild).

So doing a little conversion 10191 AG would be closer to 23,000 or 24,000 AD. Humanity's been stale for quite a bit longer than you thought (and that "staleness" plays a rather large role in the subsequent story).

fangblackbone wrote:

Quinn is tha bomb!

I would recommend staying away from his channel if you don't want to be spoiled on certain plot points and endgame stuff. Even the titles of his videos can be pretty telling. That said, if you're into spoilers, then his stuff is pretty rad.

Even if you're usually very into avoiding spoilers, I'd encourage you to consider making an exception for Dune. It's sufficiently dense that I think having a broad idea of where the story is going is a big help in being able to follow it.

Also, like, it's a story about people who can see the future. Getting spoiled is just putting yourself in a position to better relate to the characters. (:

Yeah, the Dune novel builds tension by telling you ahead of time some of the tragic events that are going to happen.

hbi2k wrote:

Also, like, it's a story about people who can see the future. Getting spoiled is just putting yourself in a position to better relate to the characters. (:

I have a few thoughts on that.

Spoiler:

Wow. Way to miss the entire point of The Dune Chronicles. The entire crux and crucial plot points of the series of books is that prescience, trying to see the future, will trap you. That you’ll be railroaded into it, with no escape.
“ The future remains uncertain and so it should, for it is the canvas upon which we paint our desires. Thus always the human condition faces a beautifully empty canvas. We possess only this moment in which to dedicate ourselves continuously to the sacred presence which we share and create.” (Children of Dune)

“ To know the future absolutely it to be trapped into that future absolutely. It collapses time. Present becomes future.” (Children of Dune)

“ The people who demand that the oracle predict for them really want to know next year’s price on whalefur or something equally mundane. None of them wants an instant-by-instant prediction of his personal life.” (Heretics of Dune)

Eleima wrote:
hbi2k wrote:

Also, like, it's a story about people who can see the future. Getting spoiled is just putting yourself in a position to better relate to the characters. (:

I have a few thoughts on that.

Spoiler:

Wow. Way to miss the entire point of The Dune Chronicles. The entire crux and crucial plot points of the series of books is that prescience, trying to see the future, will trap you. That you’ll be railroaded into it, with no escape.
“ The future remains uncertain and so it should, for it is the canvas upon which we paint our desires. Thus always the human condition faces a beautifully empty canvas. We possess only this moment in which to dedicate ourselves continuously to the sacred presence which we share and create.” (Children of Dune)

“ To know the future absolutely it to be trapped into that future absolutely. It collapses time. Present becomes future.” (Children of Dune)

“ The people who demand that the oracle predict for them really want to know next year’s price on whalefur or something equally mundane. None of them wants an instant-by-instant prediction of his personal life.” (Heretics of Dune)

Wow. Way to take a lighthearted offhand comment way too seriously. Should I have boldfaced the smiley?

Eleima wrote:
hbi2k wrote:

Also, like, it's a story about people who can see the future. Getting spoiled is just putting yourself in a position to better relate to the characters. (:

I have a few thoughts on that.

Spoiler:

Wow. Way to miss the entire point of The Dune Chronicles. The entire crux and crucial plot points of the series of books is that prescience, trying to see the future, will trap you. That you’ll be railroaded into it, with no escape.
“ The future remains uncertain and so it should, for it is the canvas upon which we paint our desires. Thus always the human condition faces a beautifully empty canvas. We possess only this moment in which to dedicate ourselves continuously to the sacred presence which we share and create.” (Children of Dune)

“ To know the future absolutely it to be trapped into that future absolutely. It collapses time. Present becomes future.” (Children of Dune)

“ The people who demand that the oracle predict for them really want to know next year’s price on whalefur or something equally mundane. None of them wants an instant-by-instant prediction of his personal life.” (Heretics of Dune)

I like how the movie

Spoiler:

often used visions of alternate futures that ultimately did not come to pass to illustrate the nature of Paul's prescience.