Post a news story, entertain me!

This story should be adapted into a movie. Instead they will probably just make another version of Lord of the Flies.

Rykin wrote:

This story should be adapted into a movie. Instead they will probably just make another version of Lord of the Flies.

Just read this yesterday. Great story and inspiring for humanity.

Hobear wrote:
Rykin wrote:

This story should be adapted into a movie. Instead they will probably just make another version of Lord of the Flies.

Just read this yesterday. Great story and inspiring for humanity.

This is from Rutger Bregman and he's fantastic.

Hobear wrote:
Rykin wrote:

This story should be adapted into a movie. Instead they will probably just make another version of Lord of the Flies.

Just read this yesterday. Great story and inspiring for humanity.

Sounds like y'all need something depressing to bring you down! This is only one of many outcomes, but it's probably the most likely scenario for boys who would have survived 15 months. We wouldn't hear about the rest. They'd just be dead.

VERY cool article.

Janet Hutchins had the day off from her job as a nurse at a local hospital. She had been in town catching up with friends and had just gotten home and started making dinner. So she had only the slightest sense of the crisis that her colleagues had been dealing with across the NHS. That's when her son came upstairs and told her, a little uncertainly, that he seemed to have stopped the worst malware attack the world had ever seen.
 
“Well done, sweetheart,” Janet Hutchins said. Then she went back to chopping onions.

I just wish writers of long-form biographical articles would ditch the, "Here's the hook, in the first six paragraphs, and now we're going to rewind ten years to something you didn't come to the article to read about."

It is such a big trend right now and it just smacks of lazy writing. Hook your readers with a good story, not by slicing the conclusion in half and putting the rest at the end.

NSMike wrote:

I just wish writers of long-form biographical articles would ditch the, "Here's the hook, in the first six paragraphs, and now we're going to rewind ten years to something you didn't come to the article to read about."

It is such a big trend right now and it just smacks of lazy writing. Hook your readers with a good story, not by slicing the conclusion in half and putting the rest at the end.

*record scratch* "Yup, that's me. You might wonder how I wound up in this crazy situation?" It's prevalent in films that the trope has been transferred. I'm fine with it until I notice it, then I get annoyed.

Still, excellent fascinating article.

Vector wrote:
NSMike wrote:

I just wish writers of long-form biographical articles would ditch the, "Here's the hook, in the first six paragraphs, and now we're going to rewind ten years to something you didn't come to the article to read about."

It is such a big trend right now and it just smacks of lazy writing. Hook your readers with a good story, not by slicing the conclusion in half and putting the rest at the end.

*record scratch* "Yup, that's me. You might wonder how I wound up in this crazy situation?" It's prevalent in films that the trope has been transferred. I'm fine with it until I notice it, then I get annoyed.

Still, excellent fascinating article.

Sadly recipe writers are doing it as well. "Check out this recipe for an awesome easy to make cheesecake... but first let me tell you about the summers I spent on the farm in rural Minnesota with my grandpappy and mama."

In this case I think it was justified. The conclusion of the article hits a lot harder knowing everything the guy went through to transform into a white hat hero. Plus it clears up a lot about his history that I think a lot of people never knew about.

American kids would much rather be YouTubers than astronauts

Exactly 50 years ago today, a Saturn V rocket launched from Kennedy Space Center carrying Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins to the Moon. Four days later, Armstrong and Aldrin would land on the Moon and inspire a generation of young people to become scientists, engineers, and mathematicians.

The Apollo program's effect of inspiring America's children to pursue careers in STEM fields is one of the most powerful lasting legacies of the Moon race. Unfortunately, this effect seems to be coming to an end.

IMAGE(https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/notanastronaut-980x542.jpg)

Idiocracy here we come!

I think if the Americans were told they could give more than one answer, we'd see a lot more Astronaut-slash-YouTuber representation.

Good grief

Okay...I believe we had more stockbrokers than engineers in the 80s and 90s. Guess kids of that time would rather be rich d-bags than engineers.

Nice to see Teacher is still high on that list. Kids want to be what they see, who is watching astronauts with their kids anymore? When are they on the news?