Google Reader refugee seeks new RSS home

MannishBoy wrote:
LiquidMantis wrote:

Google has to be aware of the metrics. Maybe the issue is that they haven't been successful monetizing GReader because too many RSS-savvy people are using independent clients rather than the ad-enabled web interface.

Or maybe they think if people read the feed, they may not click through to sites that might be using ad inventory sold by...Google.

While not being able to monetize is one thing; I would assume Google is very interested in keeping tabs on what they're users are reading, when they're reading it, what screen it's read from, etc. Once I google GWJ, find it, subscribe and become a forum member, I'm not using their search engine anymore to find GWJ anymore. If I subscribe to GWJ's various threads through RSS and use GR to keep tabs, Google learns about me and my reading habits.

I really can't think of a good enough reason to kill GR; it would seems that they're trying to force us into G+, and rather people will jump on other web-based RSS services instead.

I guess that if there's anyone that has enough Big Data to support this decision, it's Google.

I'll look for the article, but I remember reading a few years ago the debate for the new ruler of the internet. The article sustained that Apple would become the next Google, as people would browse less, download an app and consume internets from there. A death by a thousand cuts, where the cuts where apps that required no search engine and no ads serviced by Google. Apple's app store would become, by aggregation, the new search engine. Google doubled down on apps and Android (things like Google Now) to remain relevant into what the internet was becoming.

It's the only reason why I would think Google is moving into Amazon's business. It's not about making money selling stuff, but not loosing eyeball share. More and more people are using internet to find out about products, compare pricing, reputable sellers and reliable delivery. Amazon was becoming the place people went to learn about products, regardless of where the actual purchase was made. Google didn't like that, and is now focusing on become the place to learn about products, digital and physical.

oilypenguin wrote:
From your 221 subscriptions, over the last 30 days you read 10,460 items, clicked 308 items, starred 43 items, and emailed 0 items.
Since February 8, 2011 you have read a total of 300,000+ items.

/weeping

Ok, we've got three months. Who can code something that looks and feels EXACTLY like reader? I will provide moral support.

To the Kickstarter, Batman!

This blows holes in my toupee. Google did itself no favors by turning off Reader's shared notes feature in a weak attempt to integrate with Google+, which probably cost them a lot of users. Based on the reactions I'm seeing, however, I think Mannish is probably right and Google's definition of "usage" is click-throughs, not actual readership.

oilypenguin wrote:
From your 221 subscriptions, over the last 30 days you read 10,460 items, clicked 308 items, starred 43 items, and emailed 0 items.
Since February 8, 2011 you have read a total of 300,000+ items.

/weeping

Ok, we've got three months. Who can code something that looks and feels EXACTLY like reader? I will provide moral support.

I bet some Open Source wunderkind are looking at this right now. I know the core functionality isn't that hard. You can build a RSS reader in Ruby in as few as 26 lines of code, but there's probably some new way of doing it that cuts that to 10.

sheared wrote:

My one requirement for a replacement is that it works with Flipboard (on the ipad).

Flipboard has you covered.

http://inside.flipboard.com/2013/03/...

Chairman_Mao wrote:
oilypenguin wrote:
From your 221 subscriptions, over the last 30 days you read 10,460 items, clicked 308 items, starred 43 items, and emailed 0 items.
Since February 8, 2011 you have read a total of 300,000+ items.

/weeping

Ok, we've got three months. Who can code something that looks and feels EXACTLY like reader? I will provide moral support.

To the Kickstarter, Batman!

This blows holes in my toupee. Google did itself no favors by turning off Reader's shared notes feature in a weak attempt to integrate with Google+, which probably cost them a lot of users. Based on the reactions I'm seeing, however, I think Mannish is probably right and Google's definition of "usage" is click-throughs, not actual readership.

But isn't click-throughs enough? In a world saturated by information, aggregation has plenty of value for the user, and lots of juicy statistics for the provider.

Am I missing something?

OK, I need an RSS reader that integrates into my browser seamlessly; lets me silo content by what I'm interested in reading (i.e. lets me have a less-visible stream for stuff that's occasionally interesting, so the mundane won't drown the I-must-read-every-update content; will let me use two-factor authentication yet be easily accessible from my email; lets me browse on mobile sometimes and keep synced with the desktop account; allows me to keep track of the statistics of my reading habits; lets me easily discover new things that I'm interested in but would never think to search for; can easily subscribe with one click from most sites with RSS feeds; is free; lets me easily export all of my data; archives posts even if they've been deleted or the original blog removed; detects when a site has been taken over by spam; lets me sort posts by interest rather than date; has a transparent and pleasant interface that stays out of my way; lets me read the web more or less anonymously; lets me easily email things but doesn't expect me to be social or share "like"s; lets me mark posts to revisit in the future; gives me an easy way to check back through my history and see what I read on a particular day; lets me import my current data; and is actually supported by people who care about it.

Also, someone should make Facebook and Twitter's RSS feeds actually work so I never have to visit their sites ever again.

Google Reader was my second most visited page on the web, and it's only second because I usually click through my gmail page to get there.

mateo wrote:
sheared wrote:

My one requirement for a replacement is that it works with Flipboard (on the ipad).

Flipboard has you covered.

http://inside.flipboard.com/2013/03/...

Since I've already done step 1 and 2, I assume once Reader is shut down, Flipboard is going to take over and and continue to pull in the RSS feed (even though my Flipboard tile I use to access this is called Google Reader)?

Seems too easy. I must be missing a step that involves exporting, sorting CVS files, remapping information, and then going through some arcane import process. I might do that just to feel worthy to keep using it after Google pulls the plug.

Gremlin wrote:

Google Reader was my second most visited page on the web, and it's only second because I usually click through my gmail page to get there.

It's definitely in my top 3 as well and basically something I've started using regularly at work to quickly sift through headlines instead of getting bogged down with scrolling through sites when I need a couple minutes break. Incredibly sad this is going away, and I'm in the same boat as everyone else. What's worse is that a large number of desktop/mobile RSS readers used Google Reader as a synchronization service, so this is going to leave a massive vacuum for a lot of people regardless of whether they used the actual website or not.

sheared wrote:
mateo wrote:
sheared wrote:

My one requirement for a replacement is that it works with Flipboard (on the ipad).

Flipboard has you covered.

http://inside.flipboard.com/2013/03/...

Since I've already done step 1 and 2, I assume once Reader is shut down, Flipboard is going to take over and and continue to pull in the RSS feed (even though my Flipboard tile I use to access this is called Google Reader)?

Seems too easy. I must be missing a step that involves exporting, sorting CVS files, remapping information, and then going through some arcane import process. I might do that just to feel worthy to keep using it after Google pulls the plug.

From what I understand, they basically pull the OPML file for you already. They just go back to Reader to see if you changed anything. So, from their standpoint, they just stop updating the changes to the feed, and keep pulling the RSS feeds in list they have.

Flipboard is exactly the opposite of what I like about Reader. I don't want a chunky magazine layout, I want a minimal layout at the top level that lets me only drill down into the stuff I'm truly interested in. One line or a paragraph with minimal space given to an image.

I don't like Flipboard or any of its ilk that I've tried.

I'm kind of crushed. I mean, I'll get over it and find something else, but Reader is such a great way to consume a large amount of content very quickly, and most of the bells and whistles on the other options seem like they slow down the consumption process, rather than enabling it.

I wonder if they'll really kill it... I mean Google has billions of dollars, if this thing is really declining so much, it can't be that expensive to just keep it running, right? From what I read, all the alternatives hare being hammered right now.

This is another one :
http://www.newsblur.com

Just when I was getting used to checking RSS feeds on my iphone : /

Mex wrote:

I wonder if they'll really kill it... I mean Google has billions of dollars, if this thing is really declining so much, it can't be that expensive to just keep it running, right? From what I read, all the alternatives hare being hammered right now.

This is another one :
http://www.newsblur.com

Just when I was getting used to checking RSS feeds on my iphone : /

NewsBlur sounds interesting. I haven't been able to see it yet, though.

Hobbes2099 wrote:
Chairman_Mao wrote:
oilypenguin wrote:
From your 221 subscriptions, over the last 30 days you read 10,460 items, clicked 308 items, starred 43 items, and emailed 0 items.
Since February 8, 2011 you have read a total of 300,000+ items.

/weeping

Ok, we've got three months. Who can code something that looks and feels EXACTLY like reader? I will provide moral support.

To the Kickstarter, Batman!

This blows holes in my toupee. Google did itself no favors by turning off Reader's shared notes feature in a weak attempt to integrate with Google+, which probably cost them a lot of users. Based on the reactions I'm seeing, however, I think Mannish is probably right and Google's definition of "usage" is click-throughs, not actual readership.

But isn't click-throughs enough? In a world saturated by information, aggregation has plenty of value for the user, and lots of juicy statistics for the provider.

Am I missing something?

no you're right. My theory is that a lot of people don't click through, however, choosing to read the article directly in Google Reader

I'm seriously bummed. First iGoogle now Reader, two of the most useful things on the net being killed off by Big G. I know RSS use has tapered off, but the alternatives don't parallel RSS runctionality at all.

iGoogle was given a long time, it's got till November, killing off Reader with so little warning seems strange.

I still feel like RSS is the glue of the internet. I've been using Google Reader since 2007 to stay up on my comics and news - Google Reader has been my f*cking newspaper for 6+ years!

From your 112 subscriptions, over the last 30 days you read 5,237 items, clicked 303 items, starred 0 items, and emailed 0 items.

Since May 17, 2009 you have read a total of 300,000+ items.

I'm in Google Reader at least 3 times a day on the PC, plus a handful of times via Flipboard on my iPhone or iPad. Not really looking forward to finding an alternative.

And I don't really feel like Twitter and Facebook are valid alternatives. Both interfaces make you go so far out of your way to organize content and choose specifically what you wanted to subscribe to.

LiquidMantis wrote:

Google has to be aware of the metrics. Maybe the issue is that they haven't been successful monetizing GReader because too many RSS-savvy people are using independent clients rather than the ad-enabled web interface.

I was most fond of using their own Android app, but I guess that's not going to work anymore, either. I've used Reader for years to keep on top of opened bug reports and new forum threads (including here at GWJ).

I'm kind of wondering if this short timeline is because they want people ready for some new feature they'll announce for G+. Seems backward, but what sl do I know.

Looking forward to seeing what innovation occurs in the next few months before I pick a replacement.

MannishBoy wrote:

Flipboard is exactly the opposite of what I like about Reader. I don't want a chunky magazine layout, I want a minimal layout at the top level that lets me only drill down into the stuff I'm truly interested in. One line or a paragraph with minimal space given to an image.

I don't like Flipboard or any of its ilk that I've tried.

Same here. I tried Pulse, Flipboard and Feedly, but they don't work with the way I browse feeds (skimming headlines, marking as read, drilling down). They do look good though!
I found Newsblur incredibly slow and unreliable. The upcoming Feed Wrangler sounds like it could be interesting, but so far it's only words. Maybe Netvibes? Or if you have a home server Fever might be the way to go.
I have to say, I never liked the Google Reader web app much, so I'm not entirely unhappy to see it go if that brings some innovation to the table. Either way, we have a few months to figure this out.

Well, my homepage at work is iGoogle with Google Reader as the main widget. I got over the fact that iGoogle is being phased out only to just learn that Reader is, too, and sooner.

Anyway, thanks for the pointers, will try to find a new home.

FARTS!

NewsBlur requires a $1 per month charge to sync more than 12 feeds. Currently, their import from Google Reader is not working. Instead, download your feeds from Google Takeout and use the import via OPML function on NewsBlur.

TheOldReader's import from Google Reader function is basically broken right now.

Feedly is verrrrrrrrry slow.

Me sad.

Damn.

Reader is literally my home page. Like MannishBoy I've tried Flipboard and don't care for the graphical interface. Simple and clean is what I'm after.

oilypenguin wrote:

Ok, we've got three months. Who can code something that looks and feels EXACTLY like reader? I will provide moral support.

I'll supply the Mountain Dew and munchies.

You know, this announcement and reading your comments has shown me how much more I could have used reader, despite using it every day.

Chairman_Mao wrote:

My theory is that a lot of people don't click through, however, choosing to read the article directly in Google Reader

While I don't really buy the lack of click-throughs theory, a lot of my feeds aren't complete articles anyway so that you have to click through to load it. Like that bastard Veloxi's Space Game Junkie blog. Ad mongers!

MannishBoy wrote:

Flipboard is exactly the opposite of what I like about Reader. I don't want a chunky magazine layout, I want a minimal layout at the top level that lets me only drill down into the stuff I'm truly interested in. One line or a paragraph with minimal space given to an image.

I don't like Flipboard or any of its ilk that I've tried.

Exactly! I have way too many feeds for some splashy graphical presentation. I just want something that presents clean headlines in a basic email style layout.

I'm pretty sure this is just a simple case of "it's plus or the highway" that's taking over Google.

The outrage to this has been so massive that I wouldn't be surprised to see Google reverse this decision, simply to avoid the massive good will this is costing them. This is the problem with public company thinking, it's so short-sighted that they don't realise even though Reader may not be directly monetising itself, it may have a lot of spin-off effects. I actually didn't use Reader myself but I know so many who did and a lot of those people will think twice before heavily relying on Google services again. As someone who hosts two domains on the Google Apps Free platform (which recently stopped taking new signups), I'm seriously considering coming up with a plan to move my e-mail elsewhere because I no longer have any confidence that Google won't just cut it off some day. And I'm not paying for it, they have every right to. But it still shakes my confidence in them.

So I migrated everything over to Google Currents last night and used it this morning during breakfast. It's not perfect, and I hate the lack of web interface, but so far it's looking usable. It's also pretty.

Two things that bother me is that you 1) can't mark things as unread, and 2) syncing is kinda really flaky. It's especially bad for 'Feeds' (as opposed to direct-to-Current 'Editions' such as CNET, CBC, etc).

Parallax Abstraction wrote:

The outrage to this has been so massive that I wouldn't be surprised to see Google reverse this decision, simply to avoid the massive good will this is costing them.

Or at least make it open source so others can run with it.