Seemingly "Good" games that have baggage that "ruins" them

Eezy_Bordone wrote:
Danjo Olivaw wrote:

Let Snopes know it's a real occurrence, and not just a racist anecdote tossed about at my family's get togethers.

I will, Bremerton WA breaks all barriers.

Ha! Maybe it's a WA thing, but I went to high school in south seattle with a kid named Tess Tickle.

kuddles wrote:

90% of all JRPG's that turn into a mandatory grindfest two-thirds of the way into the game. Seriously, do you know how many of those games I would actually get around to playing if there wasn't a 10+ hour slog added to the campaign?

This a thousand times this. Except it's 20+ hours of slog usually. I like rpgs but they have way too much filler. I can think of a dozen rpgs I'd love to finish if they only took less time and were less repetitive.

I'd say Dragon age 2 was burdened by the baggage of expectations raised by Dragon Age origins. As much as it pains me to say it there's definitely a good game in there as many people enjoyed playing it.

I say any console game that is online only. Why am I buying a game in a store and getting a disc required to play it if I am then unable to play it if my internet is out? DC online was fun at first but when my wifi messed up I found myself wondering why I had the disc at all.

Also any and all games that have elements with no purpose. I've had a few where I beat the game, gone and looked up faqs, and nearly thrown my controller across the room when I relized I wasted hours of my life trying to get series of items that served no purpose. FF7 and the 1/35th soldier comes to mind.

Finally, FF9's card game and the fact that you needed to get decent or lucky at it for a plot purpose. Whoever thought following triple triad up with a hexadecimal based card game with hidden random number generation used to determine which card won or lost should have been shot in development and issued a post mortem apology for conceiving the idea to begin with. It's worse than imaginary numbers.

strangederby wrote:

I'd say Dragon age 2 was burdened by the baggage of expectations raised by Dragon Age origins.

And also burdened by it star character, The Cave.

But yes, I would say it was a good game. I'm among those who still enjoyed it despite some big flaws.

Its been mentioned already but +1 for AC3s optional objectives. They completely ruined that game for me. I know they are optional but the way they are presented sucks. It felt like if you weren't 100% the mission you weren't doing it right. It was awful.

Puzzle Quest 2. Great game, really REALLY long unskippable intro cutscene every time you fire the game up. I don't need to see your damn licenses and developer logos for the 40th time, I just want to play the game I paid for.

I posted details on how to disable them in the PQ2 thread.

Metal Gear. Pretty much any of them, but the later, the worse. I think those games would be twice as good (and half as long) if they didn't try to explain everything about their totally crazy and convoluted plots.

Finished Vanquish. Other then being rather short (one day and a bit more) it was a great ride.

I didn't play long enough to really call it a "great game," but from reviewer comments I was very excited to give LA Noire a try. Discovering that I can't manually save, and being forced to replay the opening 15 minutes 3 times was enough to ruin it for me.

Feeling that the game was forcing me to play in blocks of time it picked instead of letting me choose just won't work.

/me waits for someone to point out there was a manual save and I just couldn't figure it out.

The Witcher 1 at launch had such atrocious load times that I put it down until the enhanced patch. The Viva Pinata port to PC had such atrocious console-inspired UI that I had to quit that. Stalker Clear Sky started funneling me toward the ending using corridors so I quit that.

Montalban wrote:

The Witcher 1 at launch had such atrocious load times that I put it down until the enhanced patch. The Viva Pinata port to PC had such atrocious console-inspired UI that I had to quit that. Stalker Clear Sky started funneling me toward the ending using corridors so I quit that.

I never did utterly complete Viva Pinata on my friend's 360. PC port you say? *scratches chin, looks at 360 pad* HMMMMMMmmmm.

A couple of sacred cows:

Psychonauts has an unforgivably bad camera at times (such as under water).

Beyond Good and Evil has some unforgiving stealth towards the back end of the game.

Kingdoms of Amalur. Fantastic brawler. Ruined by marketing people implying that it's Skyrim. The game is an out and out brawler. There's some crafting and leveling mechanics to make it more interesting, but its core gameplay mechanic is brawling. You go somwhere, you fight. Go somewhere else, fight. It's kind of like a gigantic Double Dragon with character levels. People who went into it expecting Skyrim were soundly disappointed.

LarryC wrote:

Kingdoms of Amalur. Fantastic brawler. Ruined by marketing people implying that it's Skyrim. The game is an out and out brawler. There's some crafting and leveling mechanics to make it more interesting, but its core gameplay mechanic is brawling. You go somwhere, you fight. Go somewhere else, fight. It's kind of like a gigantic Double Dragon with character levels. People who went into it expecting Skyrim were soundly disappointed.

To be fair, it had basic quests, story, crafting, levelling, builds, and so on. It was an RPG. As far as skyrim goes, everyone wants to compare themselves to the current big hit of the time, and that was soon after skyrim released.

Scratched:

"RPG" is kind of a catch-all that's more misleading than informative. These days, everything's got RPG elements. Even CoD has perks that simulate feat or power acquisition. Quests and story are present, but those are gameplay elements that exist even in Street Fighter. Granted, Amalur's story is a lot longer-winded and some are quite intriguing. However, they do not offer you many choices that are often expected in Western-style "RPGs," which may further annoy Western RPG enthusiasts.

Whereas there are crafts, builds, and leveling, those are all support elements to the brawling, which is what you'll be doing half the time - the other half being devoted to all the rest of the supportive elements. In the same manner, D&D is an "RPG," arguably "THE RPG," but the core mechanic of the game is a tactical wargame, to which it is best suited. Games focusing on narrative or character conflict are better served by other kinds of RPGs.

Muramasa was also ill-served by the "RPG" moniker. It, too, is mainly a brawler. People looking for an engaging narrative game and choices or platforming were soundly disappointed.

Both these games could probably be better described as "Brawler-RPG," a specific form of "Action-RPG," with Diablo and Torchlight being in a similar category.

At some point trying to define things into all these sub genres makes everything all muddled. As someone who has played Amalur I have no problem calling it a plain old RPG. The most niche I would get with it would be Action-RPG but in my brain that's where diablo, torchlight, sacred, etc live and they aren't at all the same type of game as Amalur.

I don't think i would ever use the term brawler-rpg. A brawler is a game where you punch folks in the face alot ala Final Fight. Even if it has RPG elements in it then its still just a brawler.

Walks like a duck, talks like a duck...

Cobble:

Shrug. I was happy to call it an out-and-out brawler in the name of clarity, FWIW. The context here is not we who enjoyed it, but all the people who were dissatisfied with its mainly brawling sensibility. I've heard people call Amalur "repetitive," even though it has less fight in it than, say, Street Fighter. I liked it for what it was, but some people don't like a game where most of the conflict management you do is fight all the time. In that sense, KoA was marred by its marketing. It was sold as something it really wasn't.

I'd feel terribly misled if someone told me Reckoning was simply a brawler. When I hear brawler I think of River City Ransom, Double Dragon, or more recently Anarchy Reigns or MadWorld. Or yes, Muramasa. It's a lot closer to Skyrim than it is to any of those games. Reckoning has a large, nonlinear world and an very customizable avatar. I think Action RPG gets the idea across as well as can be expected.

silentsod wrote:
Montalban wrote:

The Witcher 1 at launch had such atrocious load times that I put it down until the enhanced patch. The Viva Pinata port to PC had such atrocious console-inspired UI that I had to quit that. Stalker Clear Sky started funneling me toward the ending using corridors so I quit that.

I never did utterly complete Viva Pinata on my friend's 360. PC port you say? *scratches chin, looks at 360 pad* HMMMMMMmmmm.

Yeah, wait...what? Viva Piñata is on the PC? Does it have controller support? Where can I purchase it? Again. Because damn was that an outstanding game.

Vampire: The Masquerade Bloodlines.

Now, I love this game; it would easily make my top-5 most awesome games of forever, were I to make such a list. In fact, I just updated it with Wesp's latest patch and am planning another play-through once I wrap up Dishonored. But let's face it, without the continued support over the years of some seriously dedicated gamers, this game would be a buggy nightmare. I've encountered some bugs (even after extensive patching) that make it virtually unplayable; loading up a new game is still a bit of a crap shoot regarding whether or not it's going to bug out. I guess it doesn't necessarily ruin the game, per se, but hinders it in a way that you really can't overlook.

Nicholaas wrote:

Vampire: The Masquerade Bloodlines.

Now, I love this game; it would easily make my top-5 most awesome games of forever, were I to make such a list. In fact, I just updated it with Wesp's latest patch and am planning another play-through once I wrap up Dishonored. But let's face it, without the continued support over the years of some seriously dedicated gamers, this game would be a buggy nightmare. I've encountered some bugs (even after extensive patching) that make it virtually unplayable; loading up a new game is still a bit of a crap shoot regarding whether or not it's going to bug out. I guess it doesn't necessarily ruin the game, per se, but hinders it in a way that you really can't overlook.

This and Alpha Protocol. Both are incredible flawed, but are totally worth dealing with the flaws. Only truly ambitious games can have this many issues.

Vector wrote:
silentsod wrote:

I never did utterly complete Viva Pinata on my friend's 360. PC port you say? *scratches chin, looks at 360 pad* HMMMMMMmmmm.

Yeah, wait...what? Viva Piñata is on the PC? Does it have controller support? Where can I purchase it? Again. Because damn was that an outstanding game.

$10.50 at Amazon right now. If I had paid that, maybe I would have put up with the UI a bit longer.

Montalban wrote:
Vector wrote:
silentsod wrote:

I never did utterly complete Viva Pinata on my friend's 360. PC port you say? *scratches chin, looks at 360 pad* HMMMMMMmmmm.

Yeah, wait...what? Viva Piñata is on the PC? Does it have controller support? Where can I purchase it? Again. Because damn was that an outstanding game.

$10.50 at Amazon right now. If I had paid that, maybe I would have put up with the UI a bit longer.

There's another link where it's $5.95 on Amazon. I'm thinking about buying this because gardens full of brightly colored pinatas!

Malor wrote:

The Petrified Forest was nothin' compared to the horse race puzzle. Dear God, that was insane.

If you're gonna remember Grim's most impenetrable, crap puzzle, the horse race picture is definitely the one.

Tuesday is kitty hat day.