The vinyl spin-all

fleabagmatt wrote:

As far as I can tell, this stuff isn't available on vinyl (or even as a whole album), but if I ever do find it I will most definitely pick it up. I'm absolutely loving this song.

That's a damn good song.

Oh sh*t! A vinyl thread! When I get home I'll take some pics and start schooling all. of. you.

That Latasha Lee is great!

H to the ickle wrote:

I cracked open my receiver yesterday because some of the knobs were scratchy and some of the switches were loud. I wish I had taken a picture of what 40 years of dust looks like before I blew it out with compressed air and cleaned/lubricated all of the pots. Now the knobs a smooth and silent and somehow it seems like the thing sounds better in a way I can't put my finger on but that's probably all in my head.

Is it a tube amp?

tuffalobuffalo wrote:
fleabagmatt wrote:

When I first hooked it up and played some music I actually reached down and felt the speaker cone on the sub to see if it was working. I figure that my audio setup isn't the greatest anyhow, but now I'm wondering if the lack of low end has to do with the turntable.

It probably is the turntable. I've gone through a bunch of them with my current system. I've used the Sony equivalent to what you have and the lack of bass definition is was the first thing I noticed when I hooked it up recently. The easiest way for you to get an idea would probably be to play a vinyl and then play a digital version of it. The nice thing about inexpensive stuff is that you always get use to it, so you can always use it and be happy. Then, whenever you do get the itch to invest in something better you can be amazed by the awesomeness.

You are also going to want to check out the cartridge as well. Different cartridges have different sounds, so it's best to do some research and find out what will best suit your tastes.

fleabagmatt wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:
H to the ickle wrote:

JDoes anyone else have any soul recommendations?

Interested in recommendations, too.

See my Sharon Jones post above.

Sharon Jones is great; in fact all of the Daptone stuff is really great (https://daptonerecords.com/)

Since we're on more 'modern' artists, I'd also recommend The Breakestra, El Michael's Affair, Poets of Rhythm and Lee Fields. Some of this stuff veers closer to funk, but hey, James Brown was the Godfather of Soul, not funk.

nel e nel wrote:

When I get home I'll take some pics and start schooling all. of. you.

IMAGE(http://weknowgifs.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/data-yes-gif.gif)

nel e nel wrote:

Is it a tube amp?

Nope, not a tube amp.

Just picked up "Speaking in Tongues" by the Talking Heads. So much fun (but I guess I knew that already).

IMAGE(http://s.pixogs.com/image/R-3692586-1340586607-3006.jpeg)

I'm not 100% sold on classical vinyl being better than digital, but I ordered this the other day. A young and idealistic Slatkin, a fantastic St. Louis Symphony, and a piece I know well

Sound quality aside, what I absolutely love about vinyl is that it's so tactile. You can see all the changes just by looking at the grooves on the record, drop a needle wherever you want and find that spot just by looking at the record, etc. I haven't seen an interface yet that came close to providing that kind of feedback for a digital track. There's also a ton of classic music that just isn't available in digital form, if that's your bag. On the flip-side, records are quite expensive, large, heavy, and annoying to maintain. Like any enthusiast pursuit, you don't get into it unless interacting with and caring for vinyl records really appeals to you. It's just not worth it simply for the sound quality alone.

complexmath wrote:

Sound quality aside, what I absolutely love about vinyl is that it's so tactile.

There's a kind of purposeful ritual to the whole vinyl listening experience that's missing from today's digital domain. Vinyl music selection is both tactile and deliberate, involving and engaging the listener even before stylus meets groove in a uniquely intimate way.

I can't think of another recorded music format that better prepares the individual for the very event of *listening* than vinyl.

The sound quality of vinyl is a 'warmth' that you don't get with digital. Sure, digital is optimized to be able to hear all the frequencies and whatnot, but alot of modern recordings/mixes are compressed to the point where they sound dynamically flat. Not to mention digital artifacts and other stuff that can sound really bad.

Anyways, PICTURES!

I'm in the process of backing up/moving my photos to a new external HD, and here is one from a few years back that is a great little gem:

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/9gAKm2B.jpg?1)

Speaking of folks getting into soul, if y'all are talking about Bill Withers, you also need to get some Donny Hathaway in your life. "Everything is Everything" is the big one in his discography. He also has a great live album, and a great little gem with Roberta Flack.

More pictures! Here are a few random samplings:

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/I0cUjN8.jpg?1)

Why yes, that is a live William Shatner album.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/AP31yos.jpg?1)

These are some great compilations of remixed Bollywood soundtrack songs. There is a wealth of great music from the 70s Bollywood movies, and they got a bunch of DJs/producers/remixers to go to town on some of the better ones.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/Kf5kURE.jpg?1)

I got this album primarily for the title track; most of you will probably remember it from the Reservoir Dogs soundtrack, as was the case with me when I first got it. I was pleasantly surprised that there were about 4 other equally funky soul tracks on this one as well.

complexmath wrote:

Sound quality aside, what I absolutely love about vinyl is that it's so tactile. You can see all the changes just by looking at the grooves on the record, drop a needle wherever you want and find that spot just by looking at the record, etc. I haven't seen an interface yet that came close to providing that kind of feedback for a digital track. There's also a ton of classic music that just isn't available in digital form, if that's your bag. On the flip-side, records are quite expensive, large, heavy, and annoying to maintain. Like any enthusiast pursuit, you don't get into it unless interacting with and caring for vinyl records really appeals to you. It's just not worth it simply for the sound quality alone.

The experience is what brought me back to vinyl. Just listening to an entire side, in order, without random, without being able to hit a button at a whim to bring up a new track. Putting on a record, sit and listen. It feels almost rebellious.

jonnypolite wrote:

Just listening to an entire side, in order, without random

This is something that I've been thinking about lately as well. I assume that songs are put in a particular order on an album for a reason and that flow of the music has greatly gotten lost with that skip button so easily at hand. I'm enjoying rediscovering that flow.

Back in the 90s I had a couple cheap DJ turntables, so most of my record stash consists of 12" singles. There were a few full LPs that I missed listening to and when my local book/comic/game store started selling records as well, I fell into flipping through the bins just for the fun of it. Now I have a turntable again and spend a couple lunchtimes a week digging through the record bin at the thrift store.

Speaking of 12 records, I popped this on while getting ready for work this morning.

For me the turntable is all about active listening. I can't just throw something on with half a thought and go do something else like I can with Pandora or my Squeezebox. A record usually involves my chair, a beverage, maybe a score, and of course there's the flip that comes sooner than I think it should.

fleabagmatt wrote:
jonnypolite wrote:

Just listening to an entire side, in order, without random

This is something that I've been thinking about lately as well. I assume that songs are put in a particular order on an album for a reason and that flow of the music has greatly gotten lost with that skip button so easily at hand. I'm enjoying rediscovering that flow.

They absolutely are, although it isn't like that with every album. Back in the day, most music was consumed in a single format (we're talking 78s and 45s here back in the early days of records/turntables), unless it was a concerto/classical music. A lot of albums were collections of an artist's hit singles (the US versions of the early Beatles albums are a great example). But then folks started crafting album 'experiences' and you started getting these great releases. Imagine trying to listen to Sgt. Pepper's or Dark Side of the Moon or Tommy or Kilroy Was Here on random.

Early rap/hip hop was the same way, a lot of artists were putting out records on their own and selling them out of the trunk of their cars at local shows, so their early albums were more compilations than anything else. It wasn't until they started getting record contracts that they started putting thought into complete albums, and the programming of the song order was always important.

Osiran wrote:

For me the turntable is all about active listening. I can't just throw something on with half a thought and go do something else like I can with Pandora or my Squeezebox. A record usually involves my chair, a beverage, maybe a score, and of course there's the flip that comes sooner than I think it should.

That's why I initially got into DJing--it gave me something to do while I was listening to my records that allowed me to focus on the music. Then, thinking about how to put songs together made me think more deeply about the structure of the music I was listening to. The only downside is that now I can't not hear the nuances of other people's mixes, which has made it difficult to just enjoy someone's performance. But then when someone does really well it's all the more exciting, so I guess it balances out.

I remember seeing that Death Proof vinyl existed but I didn't know it was colored like that. I want.

Yeah, I think that people like vinyl for some of the same reasons they like board games. They're fun and a different way to engage.

Edit: I can't listen to albums out of order no matter what format, and I don't do playlists. Just doesn't work for me.

I just got an email from Minority Records saying that they rereleased Floex: Zorya and this time on Sky Blue Vinyl! It looks gorgeous. I bought the 2nd release which was on clear yellow with yellow label. The first release was clear vinyl, and the third release was black. This is the 4th release. It's a fantastic record from the composer of the Machinarium soundtrack. I highly recommend buying it. It ends up being $35 USD with shipping, and I ordered the new copy.

Here's what the new release looks like:

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/IGttsOb.jpg)

It's actual much prettier than the 2nd release. The whole album can be listened to on Soundcloud.

This is my favorite piece on the album.

That's very cool.

Nice. Yeah, I have a few of the speckled ones, too. They're fun.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

I remember seeing that Death Proof vinyl existed but I didn't know it was colored like that. I want. :)

Yeah, I got all the Tarantino soundtracks on vinyl except for Basterds and Django. I think the exact name for the Death Proof vinyl color is 'blood spattered pavement'.

EDIT: OH. sh*t.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/EUQ2Pba.jpg?1)

http://www.myplaydirect.com/django-u...

The rather massive record store day list went up a few days ago. I didn't see any must haves for me until Sigur Ros - Agaetis Byrjun came up. That never got a US release on vinyl I guess. They have copies up on eBay for $200. Well, they won't be worth that much in a few weeks. I'm sure there will be tons of copies, so it's not like you have to get it on record store day.

There are a lot of fun 7"s. Also, Built to Spill - Live is finally getting a vinyl rerelease. I had to buy a copy on eBay a few years back and it ran me $50 because it was out of print. It's a great record and includes 2 tracks that aren't on the CD. Best cover of Cortez the Killer ever is on it.

Ah crap, I see that there is a 10 anniversary edition release of The White Stripes - Elephant. That's probably gonna be freaking hard to get. The Third Man Records stuff is great but ends up being an eBay resale clusterf***. You pretty much just have to be a part of the club, but I really don't want to subscribe because I don't like everything that they release.

Edit: Oh yeah, there is some sort of Call of Duty picture disc. I'm sure that's a must buy for you all.

IMAGE(http://www.recordstoreday.com/Photo/418455344261:245)

So the in-laws are in town for Easter as wifey is too pregnant to travel, so I decided to teach my niece the true meaning of Easter:

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/zHZubqG.jpg?1)

Nice.

Crap, I am weak. I was listening to a Dead Weather vinyl and signed up for the Third Man Records vault. I can always cancel it, right?

I busted out one of my favorites today. Team Ghost was formed by a former member of M83 if I recall correctly.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/hFECpIh.jpg)

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/BwaHZoE.jpg)

This vinyl turned out pretty gorgeous. I'm guessing that all of the pressings of this particular EP are fairly unique.

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

I busted out one of my favorites today. Team Ghost was formed by a former member of M83 if I recall correctly.

This vinyl turned out pretty gorgeous. I'm guessing that all of the pressings of this particular EP are fairly unique.

Yeah Fromageau and a whole bunch of other French dudes

It's a good record. Been listenin' to it for a few days now and I'm impressed

Finally got around to getting a new cartridge and needle for the turntable TuffaloBuffalo so graciously gave me. It sounds great.

Shout out to Clinton Street Record & Stereo, they have a great selection and the guy who runs the place is super knowledgeable and cool.

I was listening to Fleetwood Mac, Rumors last night while I made dinner. It was another thrift store pickup. I've never listened to the entire album before, though I think I've heard most all the songs individually. I got to wondering if there are albums full of hits like this any more. It seems like you generally will get a couple of really popular songs from an album, and then on to the next thing. Not that I'm very well versed on pop music, but I couldn't think of any modern examples of modern albums that are full of hit songs. Is that a thing of the past?

Wife thinks it's partly to do with the iTunes business model, people tend to buy songs now, not whole albums.