Steam on a small SSD

Well, that's the trade-off for a machine built as thin as is humanly possible given the currently available components.

They could do it right, and still keep it that thin. The system's in a metal case: they could put it on an edge connector.

Migration is complete! Was fairly painless although a couple panic moments when the Samsung software couldn't clone the RAID array due to issues with defragmenting. So I used the EaseUS Todo program instead and it worked without any trouble, although I'm making a note to run some diagnostics on my hard drives (which are now past 5 years old) when I can afford to have the computer down for an extended period of time.

Only issue right now is that Samsung Magician doesn't recognize the SSD as a Samsung product. I'm not sure if there's a bug in the latest version of their software or if this is either due to Windows 7 SP1 or the Gigabyte/JMicron SATA2 controller driver. Checked for new driver, hasn't been a new one since 2011 (which I'm currently running). The motherboard has an Intel SATA2 controller I'm using for the RAID, I might try and move the SSD to that and see if it fixes the detection issue. But overall not too worried about this.

Otherwise, this went smooth and I'm quite happy with the improved performance on the computer. Thanks for the help Malor!

*Legion* wrote:
Malor wrote:

I've never opened one to look, but it wouldn't shock me if most of that drive is empty space.

Pretty much. They're in a 2.5" body just for compatibility with existing drive bays, really.

On Apple laptops, they solder the storage chips to the board instead of using a drive, and it is indeed just a few thin little chips.

Yup. Here's what a Samsung 840 EVO looks like inside: http://techreport.com/gallery/25122/.... Just a small PCB and a lot of air

Glad you're up and running. Life in SSD Land is good.

or the Gigabyte/JMicron SATA2 controller driver.

If you can, plug it into an Intel SATA port. It will probably run better there. The spinning drives can kind of be anywhere, but SSDs benefit from both SATA3 speeds and the quality of the Intel drivers.

Malor wrote:

The spinning drives can kind of be anywhere, but SSDs benefit from both SATA3 speeds and the quality of the Intel drivers.

It's a SATA2 Intel controller. I was thinking that using both controllers would make the most sense, but maybe that's not quite the right line of thinking.

Many recent boards have a mix of Intel SATA2 and 3 ports; I think the 67 and 77 had two SATA3 each, with four SATA2, and the 87s have all six ports at SATA3 speed. And then there will often be additional ports as well, driven by another brand of chip. If you're further back than that, all you'll have is SATA2, which is fine. But if you have any SATA3 ports, most current SSDs can take advantage of the additional speed.

As far as I know, there's no reason to split between chips... I believe the Intel controller can drive all its ports at full speed, so loading that one up first will usually be a little better.

Malor wrote:

And, wow, what a bad idea, soldering chips with such short lifetimes to the board. When that SSD fails, the Air is useless.

Good for Apple, because they can sell more replacements. Not so hot for users.

Not so good for brand reputation and consumer loyalty, either. How short a lifespan are you claiming? As I understood it, going to flash and using glue instead of screws was more about reducing the potential of mechanical failure than anything else. And if it's less than 5 years old, I bet they'd at least have a process to replace the flash chips.

I bet they'd at least have a process to replace the flash chips.

I can't be absolutely certain from the picture whether the chips are soldered or socketed, but if they're soldered, I think the only repair process possible is 'motherboard replacement'.

Malor wrote:

Many recent boards have a mix of Intel SATA2 and 3 ports; I think the 67 and 77 had two SATA3 each, with four SATA2, and the 87s have all six ports at SATA3 speed. And then there will often be additional ports as well, driven by another brand of chip. If you're further back than that, all you'll have is SATA2, which is fine. But if you have any SATA3 ports, most current SSDs can take advantage of the additional speed.

It's a P55 board, so it's all SATA 2. Otherwise I would've put the SSD on SATA 3

I have a Sata 3 card but not Intel. My SSD runs MUCH faster on the Intel Sata II than the aftermarket Sata III.

With the Sata III card, it wasn't recognized as a Samsung device by the Magician software.

Okay, now my question.

I am planning on reinstalling window 8 on my sons computer (the original install was a Win 7 to Win 8 upgrade and I feel like his new machine is suffering from this).

I want to get him a Samsung EVO 500. Should I just install SSD and treat it like a regular C drive? I mean just install windows normally (with its swap files and such) and not worry? Does the swap file mess with the SSD's lifespan?

His computer is an i5-4670K with 16gb memory and SATA III.