Recommend me some classical music

Wrong octave like you would expect it to be lower, or higher?

clover wrote:
Wrong octave like you would expect it to be lower, or higher?

Higher! I believe it's one octave higher, but it's hard for me to recall since it's a violin melody.

Here's a virtual piano to play it on.

Gaaaaahhhhh damn it, tuffalo! That does sound familar to me, but I can't place it either.

Now I'm just going to listen to this on loop for the rest of the day and drive myself mad.

I was originally thinking Brahms. I checked some Hungarian Dances on YouTube, but I couldn't find it. This is really driving me crazy.

Schubert's Ständchen, D957

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6Njg...

edit: I am familiar with it as a vocal piece, one of the songs from the Schwanengesang cycle, but it's obviously well known as an instrumental piece as well.

Hurray! That's it. That makes me happy. Thank you!

Edit: Yeah, I see that the instrumental versions are arrangements. I think they tend to throw instrumental arrangements of the song in movie soundtracks.

Podunk to the rescue!

Yay, glad I could help!

I only mention that it's originally a song because it's very beautiful, and well worth listening to the original version sung by a good singer.

Podunk wrote:
Yay, glad I could help!

I only mention that it's originally a song because it's very beautiful, and well worth listening to the original version sung by a good singer.

F'rexample:

Amen, brother.

Ooh, are we posting our favorite Schubert lieder now?

"Mein Vater, mein Vater!"

So, I figured out why the Anna Karenina soundtrack made me think of the Schubert Serenade. It's that minor sixth. Also, there's a glissando that sort of goes on with some of the string arrangements of the Serenade. The following clip is set to start at the right spot.

Ooh, are we posting our favorite Schubert lieder now?

No, but that's cool.

(BTW, mine is probably Nacht und Traume, though I also just adore Die Schone Mullerin)

You can mock Der Erlkönig when you can play the piano part.

Minarchist wrote:
:(

You can mock Der Erlkönig when you can play the piano part. :P

No mockery intended! Erlkönig is awesome, it's just not my favorite is all.

A likely story...

Winterreise or bust!

In advance of its May 2013 concert series, Carnegie Hall has created a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) that will teach students how to listen to orchestras. The course, S4MU — short for Spring 4 Music University – is premised on the idea that “listening is an art itself,” and that you won’t overcome a tin ear by studying music theory alone. Starting on April 1, the four-week course will be taught by Baltimore Symphony Orchestra conductor Marin Alsop; ArtsJournal editor Douglas McLennan (seen above); composer Jennifer Higdon; vocalist Storm Large; and conductor Leonard Slatkin. Like all other MOOCs, the course is free. You can reserve your spot in the class right here.

Spring 4 Music University has been added to our complete list of MOOCs, where you will find 45 courses starting in April.

Cool!

Podunk wrote:
Schubert's Ständchen, D957

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6Njg...

edit: I am familiar with it as a vocal piece, one of the songs from the Schwanengesang cycle, but it's obviously well known as an instrumental piece as well.

Tanglebones wrote:
Podunk wrote:
Yay, glad I could help!

I only mention that it's originally a song because it's very beautiful, and well worth listening to the original version sung by a good singer.

F'rexample:

most definitely. still the best, though retired.

Podunk wrote:
Ooh, are we posting our favorite Schubert lieder now?

No, but that's cool.

(BTW, mine is probably Nacht und Traume, though I also just adore Die Schone Mullerin)

I love your choices. Nacht und Traume is sublime, matchless, when done well. Die Schone Mullerin is probably my favorite of the Schubert cycles. The Fischer-Dieskau/Eschenbach performance of Schumann's Liederkreis (Eichendorff) is right up there too.

I just saw this thread and I'm saddened it took so long to see someone mention Rachmaninoff. He is/was one of my favorite composers to play because you're just all over the keyboard and definitely in that romantic era.

Holst is one of my favorites; I'm an instrumental brass player who got my degree in Tuba so I have a special place in my heart for his Planets suite.

I also love Debussey. He's a great impressionistic composer with an ethereal quality that I find so soothing.

Saint-Seans was also mentioned in this thread. The entire piece can be a bit lacking outside of the Samson and Delilah Baccanale but the intro is one of me absolute favorite pieces of oboe music.

In general, you cannot go wrong with any opera listened as a bookend. Vivaldi, Mozart, Wagner and Monteverdi all have wonderful and well known pieces. I also have a guilty enjoyment of The Beggar's Opera by John Gay. A little more modern you can go with Puccini, Strauss, Bartok, or a little wink toward modern musicals with Gershwin's Porgy and Bess.

Edwin wrote:

In advance of its May 2013 concert series, Carnegie Hall has created a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) that will teach students how to listen to orchestras. The course, S4MU — short for Spring 4 Music University – is premised on the idea that “listening is an art itself,” and that you won’t overcome a tin ear by studying music theory alone. Starting on April 1, the four-week course will be taught by Baltimore Symphony Orchestra conductor Marin Alsop; ArtsJournal editor Douglas McLennan (seen above); composer Jennifer Higdon; vocalist Storm Large; and conductor Leonard Slatkin. Like all other MOOCs, the course is free. You can reserve your spot in the class right here.

Spring 4 Music University has been added to our complete list of MOOCs, where you will find 45 courses starting in April.

We actually just (this past month) put out a disc of Jennifer Higdon's music:

I had a lovely evening with my brother and sister in law going to see Yevgeny Sudbin play. It was an excellent performance. He played Chopin's Ballade #3 and played a version where he had tweaked it quite a bit. Also played Debussy's L'isle Joyeuse which was really rad to see live. Went through a few encores and ended with his crazy version of Chopin's Minute Waltz.

Crazy awesome.

Sounds interesting but the presentation is probably the douchiest I've ever seen.

If a modified version of The Four Seasons sounds appealing--or even if it doesn't--this is pretty amazing. Max Richter rules.

I'm not wild about 'rocked up' classical, especially with a drum kit. *ugh* And the whole violinist showman thing is as passe as Vanessa Mae.

But that's pretty cool, it seems quite respectful of the original work.

MrDeVil909 wrote:
I'm not wild about 'rocked up' classical, especially with a drum kit. *ugh* And the whole violinist showman thing is as passe as Vanessa Mae.

But that's pretty cool, it seems quite respectful of the original work.

Oh c'mon! I grew up with this stuff...

:LOL:

Heh, so did I. It does make the music more accessible, but I've developed a purist streak since doing my degree. I don't even like baroque music with romantic orchestras any more.

MrDeVil909 wrote:
Heh, so did I. It does make the music more accessible, but I've developed a purist streak since doing my degree. I don't even like baroque music with romantic orchestras any more.

I generally feel the same way, although I'm warming up to different interpretations. I'm really digging Glenn Gould right now. Watched a couple documentary things on Netflix which were very awesome. I thought the four seasons thing was interesting, but it's not something I would care to have a recording of or hear again at this point. It was fun to hear the primary themes from each of the movements in a minimalist, repetitive style. There were some pretty fun moments.

I went to a fun piano master class with Arnaldo Cohen this last Saturday. I didn't make the recital on Sunday. The new season was announced, so I'll probably get a season pass for the 6 Sundays coming this fall and next spring. Daniil Trifonov is going to be coming to Portland! I'm excited for that.