System Shock 2 coming to GOG.com

Hmmm, how is the linearity compared to something like Bioshock, which I would consider quite linear?

I'd say use a walkthrough for a few puzzles and if you get stuck. It's the kind of game where they intend you to find your way around though, explore and investigate.

I'd say the biggest obstacle in DE isn't there in SS2, which is the poor combat. It's very direct and obvious. While there are many ways to build your character, going for plain bullet shooting weapons is pretty foolproof. You still have the scarcity of resources issue though, and if you're not good at aiming and hitting, you'll end up needing to use the wrench (and you can spec melee).

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

Hmmm, how is the linearity compared to something like Bioshock, which I would consider quite linear?

SS2 was co-developed with Irrational, so it's a bit more linear than System Shock 1, but it's not like Bioshock: you do have the ability to explore, get into trouble, or get lost on the failing, dangerous, and dark ship.

Thanks for the input everyone! I like what you are saying about the combat, Scratched. You are correct about DE now that I think about it. The combat took a bit of work. It was cool, but it was work. It sounds like the combat is closer to maybe Half Life then?

tuffalobuffalo wrote:

It wasn't really the graphics or interface of Deus Ex; it was mostly the gameplay.

Same boat. I tried to play the original Deus Ex about a year before HR came out, and I didn't get much further than 2 or 3 hours in before I quit. I could see and appreciate the depth of the many systems, but that wasn't enough to make it fun. The gameplay just didn't seem to hold up well at all without nostalgia. Thief was a similar story.

I'll probably still check this out as a huge fan of Bioshock, but I'm trying to keep my expectations low going in based on my prior experiences with similar games.

Scratched wrote:

I'd say the biggest obstacle in DE isn't there in SS2, which is the poor combat.

I haven't played SS or SS2 but I completely agree that the combat in DE was really off-putting. I think I went a few hours into the game before I realized that you had to whack people in the legs (and not the head) in order to get them to pass out. Plus you can't aim for sh*t at the start.

Once I got used to it, I managed to get most of the way through the game before getting distracted by something shiny.

SS2 is still an RPG in that stats and training matter, but I think the presentation is better. With DE you have this great big set of growing crosshairs, which fits the mechanics of "you need to take some time to aim", but seems odd in a shooter. SS2 has it shoot where you aim, but gives you a load of recoil (and lesser damage?) with low skill. I guess it's similar to the difference between Mass Effect 1 and 2.

There's a countdown on their site right now - for 11am GMT tomorrow. Which of course I would already have known if I hadn't been a filthy skimmer.

(crosses fingers for Steel Panthers - thinks that the term 'System found' makes this unlikely)

Dyni wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

It wasn't really the graphics or interface of Deus Ex; it was mostly the gameplay.

Same boat. I tried to play the original Deus Ex about a year before HR came out, and I didn't get much further than 2 or 3 hours in before I quit. I could see and appreciate the depth of the many systems, but that wasn't enough to make it fun. The gameplay just didn't seem to hold up well at all without nostalgia. Thief was a similar story.

I'll probably still check this out as a huge fan of Bioshock, but I'm trying to keep my expectations low going in based on my prior experiences with similar games.

Same here. I didn't get into PC gaming until later, so I've tried to play some classics. Deus Ex I couldn't get into. Strategy games seem to hold up better. I've been interesting in dungeon keeper 2, since I like Evil Genius, but worry that won't hold up, either.

Dyni wrote:
tuffalobuffalo wrote:

It wasn't really the graphics or interface of Deus Ex; it was mostly the gameplay.

Same boat. I tried to play the original Deus Ex about a year before HR came out, and I didn't get much further than 2 or 3 hours in before I quit. I could see and appreciate the depth of the many systems, but that wasn't enough to make it fun. The gameplay just didn't seem to hold up well at all without nostalgia. Thief was a similar story.

I'll probably still check this out as a huge fan of Bioshock, but I'm trying to keep my expectations low going in based on my prior experiences with similar games.

I think you'll have a better time with SS2 because you're engaged with the enemy almost at the outset, the goals are a bit clearer, and it's a tad more linear. Just a tad.

Yeah... I never was able to finish this game. Because of the monkeys.

Oh, the monkeys...

chaosmos wrote:

Yeah... I never was able to finish this game. Because of the monkeys.

Oh, the monkeys...

They always do me in too. SO SCARY.

IMAGE(http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mc9bnjrZIw1qam5vs.gif)

The combat in System Shock 2 holds up really well. It is a more combative RPG than Deus Ex though, Deus Ex almost feels more like the original Fallout in an FPS suit, you can get through a lot of it without firing a shot if you're clever. You'll be killing a lot of things in System Shock 2 though, so the combat system really does need to hold up. And it does!

It's also nice not having the moral ambiguity of killing your fellow man to worry about it System Shock 2, you can blast away guilt free.

Woops! Stuffed up the released date in the OG post... Should be the 14th, not that it really matters...

Everyone goes on about the monkeys. No. No, you don't know terror unless you came across the midwives. The graphics may be dated at this point but I will guarantee you the audio/mixing is on par, if not better, than many of today's games. This was the first game that actually had me, immersed as my character, hiding in some random office under the desk hoping and praying that whatever that thing was walking down the hallway and calling out to me would pass me by. Then hearing it pause and wailing "I can smell you...", some more steps and another pause "Babies need meat!".

Great, I'm probably going to have nightmares tonight.

Vega wrote:

Everyone goes on about the monkeys. No. No, you don't know terror unless you came across the midwives. The graphics may be dated at this point but I will guarantee you the audio/mixing is on par, if not better, than many of today's games. This was the first game that actually had me, immersed as my character, hiding in some random office under the desk hoping and praying that whatever that thing was walking down the hallway and calling out to me would pass me by. Then hearing it pause and wailing "I can smell you...", some more steps and another pause "Babies need meat!".

Great, I'm probably going to have nightmares tonight.

Agreed, the midwives were terrifying, especially if you find the series of audio logs related to them.

Honestly, in an otherwise scary game, I mostly found the monkeys kinda goofy.

Yeah, it's the midwives I remember.

I don't think there's an enemy in SS2 that isn't memorable in some way. Droids in the cargo bays, annelids crawling out of a corpse you just tried to loot, turrets opening up when you pass them in a lift, military bots on patrol around the residential area of rec, swarms of wasps from eggs, spiders, monkeys...

It'll be interesting to see the reaction to System Shock 2 and its relationship with Bioshock now that both are easily available. I tend to think of Bioshock as an underwater cover album of System Shock 2. It excels in many of the same ways (writing, enemy design) and lacks in many of the same ways (weak late game, poor balancing), although I think System Shock 2 comes out ahead for me personally because its mechanical systems are more interesting and much less forgiving.

ClockworkHouse wrote:

It'll be interesting to see the reaction to System Shock 2 and its relationship with Bioshock now that both are easily available. I tend to think of Bioshock as an underwater cover album of System Shock 2. It excels in many of the same ways (writing, enemy design) and lacks in many of the same ways (weak late game, poor balancing), although I think System Shock 2 comes out ahead for me personally because its mechanical systems are more interesting and much less forgiving.

Yes, to me one of the big problems with Bioshock was that it was trying to hit all the same notes as System Shock2 rather than being it's own thing entirely, and that's my biggest fear for Infinite. I can understand why they would choose to not have an inventory or a different character skill/weapon development system, but the way SS2 did it just felt better to me, more flavour in some way.

I know, classic game and all that, but I'm wondering how much GOG's arms were twisted to put it up at the $9.99 price point? I'm waffling a bit as that seems a bit high for an old game. I may just wait for a sale. Or I could just be cranky that today is Valentine's Day.

$9.99 sounds like a steal to me.

Nevin73 wrote:

I know, classic game and all that, but I'm wondering how much GOG's arms were twisted to put it up at the $9.99 price point? I'm waffling a bit as that seems a bit high for an old game. I may just wait for a sale. Or I could just be cranky that today is Valentine's Day.

I don't know, take a look around their store and there's a good mix of $6 and $10 prices on a lot of games.

Yeah, I'll probably have a go at it tonight. If I start getting traumatized, I can always go back to playing Ni No Kuni. I read somewhere that it was also coming to Steam. What's the time frame for that happening? I'll probably just get it off of GoG anyways.

Sitting parked in some out-of-the-way corner of SS2, waiting for something or other, I truly understood, for the first time, what 'the heebie jeebies' actually meant.

I was listening to a midwife singing to her 'little ones', and suddenly it hit me that that had been once been a woman, someone who grumbled when she got up in the morning, and liked her coffee a little burnt, and was annoyed with her supervisor, and suddenly she'd had a good chunk of her brain cut out, and the rest rewired to turn her into a mother for worms. That wasn't just a thing on the other side of the wall, it was Phoebe in accounting, or Mary from HR, forced into the most horrific possible servitude. Most of what they had left was maternal instinct, but it had been hijacked. Serious, serious heebie-jeebies.

It's a good thing I didn't know about the cordyceps fungus at the time, or I dunno what I would have done. Realizing that something like that could actually happen, and did happen in some species, would not have helped my sleep that week.

I'm surprised Irrational haven't done anything about it, not a mention on their main website and it would be a good little bit of publicity for BI.

Vega wrote:

Everyone goes on about the monkeys. No. No, you don't know terror unless you came across the midwives. The graphics may be dated at this point but I will guarantee you the audio/mixing is on par, if not better, than many of today's games. This was the first game that actually had me, immersed as my character, hiding in some random office under the desk hoping and praying that whatever that thing was walking down the hallway and calling out to me would pass me by. Then hearing it pause and wailing "I can smell you...", some more steps and another pause "Babies need meat!".

Great, I'm probably going to have nightmares tonight.

Oh god, the midwives. CREEPED ME THE EFFFFFF OUT!

Soundclip: Little Ones Need Lots of Meat
Soundclip: Humming