Verizon's "Six Strikes" rule revealed.

Verizon's new anti-piracy scheme unveiled.
Given their overall lack of success in the legal world, Media companies have found a way to just cut that part out altogether.

http://torrentfreak.com/verizons-six...

This isn't just Verizon's plan, all the big 6 ISPs in the US will be doing something similar.

I don't see how this could go wrong. I mean, they never make mistakes with this sort of thing.

That's crazy talk. How do the ISP's know if your torrenting - I thought there was some sort of masking by uTorrent to avoid detection - or am I just being naive and silly?

From the other side: They hire companies to troll around for torrents, and collect IP addresses of people participating in the torrents they decide are bad. THen later you get a call. They don't have to examine what you're actually doing at all.

Also, a good way to DOS someone you don't like: send their IP address to trackers for the latest and greatest out of Hollywood.

Maybe you can correct my understanding of the legalities of torrenting. I was told a long while ago, don't know when or where, that it isn't illegal to download, but it is illegal to upload - so as long as your "leeching" your OK? Basically its the "sharing" of files that illegal, not the obtaining. But I assume that's not the case...?

I don't really do this sort of thing any more anyway - there was a period of time where I did allot of "obtaining":P but now, especially with Steam sales and TiVo boxes and TV cards for PC's and how cheap all those things are nowadays, you don't need to torrent.

I'm not sure if this is in the U.S, but I have a subscription to a chain of Cinemas called Cineworld, it costs me £15 a month, and I can watch as many films in any of their Cinemas nationwide as many times as I want. I just scan the card at the ticket booth, and get a ticket.

I think because of things like this, maybe the pirating thing may calm down a bit, and hopefully developers of our beloved hobby will be well compensated for their works and still be in jobs when their game gets released - but that's another thread all together.

Both are illegal, it's just easier to identify (and prosecute) seeders.

Why bother going after one person who downloaded one file one time, when you can prosecute someone for 1000 counts of sharing that file with 1000 people, over a long period of time, with plenty of evidence? They get more bang for their legal buck going after the seeders.

PurEvil wrote:

Both are illegal, it's just easier to identify (and prosecute) seeders.

Why bother going after one person who downloaded one file one time, when you can prosecute someone for 1000 counts of sharing that file with 1000 people, over a long period of time, with plenty of evidence? They get more bang for their legal buck going after the seeders.

Fair enough, thanks for clearing that up for me

dissposablehero wrote:

That's crazy talk. How do the ISP's know if your torrenting - I thought there was some sort of masking by uTorrent to avoid detection - or am I just being naive and silly?

Not silly by any means but your ISP knows where you're going. As someone said companies troll around and when connecting to a torrent your machine by nature of the protocol says, "Hey I'm IP 123.123.123.123! Where are the torrents at!?"

If you want more anonimity, go for usenet that at least uses SSL but any protocol can be broken.

These rules are designed to keep 'casual pirates' from downloading. Anyone that wants to download will find other sneakier methods. Also, the ISP doesn't do the policing they're just confirming you were at xyz url, this is process is to slick the wheels of justice/scare the crap out of you. The copyright owners still decide if what you've done infringes (again mainly in torrents) their stuff and the ISPS have agreed to roll over and hand over your goodies. Especially since after strike 6 the content companies can go after you still and their is most likely more evidence that you have been infringing since you've been served notice 6 times.

The sad thing this is all old news this stuff was announced a year and a half ago. For some decent articles, here is the ars search.

Eezy_Bordone wrote:

The sad thing this is all old news this stuff was announced a year and a half ago. For some decent articles, here is the ars search.

True that. This is the first I've seen of anything detailing the specific policy of an ISP though. Everything I have previously seen was sort of vague wording.
Sneaky though, while everyone is waving their arms about due to SOPA, this whole thing sits quietly waiting in the background. Goes to show if a company doesn't want anyone to make a fuss about something, they can just find a way to bypass legislation altogether.

But I digress. This topic skirts dangerouslty close to P&C. This stuff can get... touchy. But I'm actually hoping to understand more about the practical effects of this whole furball rather than jumping down the big ol' ethical rabbit hole of copyright law and infringement...

Eezy_Bordone wrote:
dissposablehero wrote:

That's crazy talk. How do the ISP's know if your torrenting - I thought there was some sort of masking by uTorrent to avoid detection - or am I just being naive and silly?

Not silly by any means but your ISP knows where you're going. As someone said companies troll around and when connect to a torrent your machine by nature of the protocol says, "Hey I'm IP 123.123.123.123! Where are the torrents at!?"

If you want more anonimity, go for usenet that at least uses SSL but any protocol can be broken.

These rules are designed to keep 'casual pirates' from downloading. Anyone that wants to download will find other sneakier methods.

I've no doubt, it will still happen, like you say, just in another way.

I am glad that things like Netflix and Lovefilm have taken off to the extent that they're available on any device really now and for me personally it's something like £30 a month for my Lovefilm subs/my cinema card and my XBL subs (on average - obviously XBL is a yearly payment) So really for less than the price of a new AAA game for the xbox per month I have access to all the entertainment I want.

Eezy_Bordone wrote:

If you want more anonimity, go for usenet that at least uses SSL but any protocol can be broken.

Shh! First rule of usenet...

Maybe I missed it but I didn't see any time frames mentioned in that blurb. What I mean by that is - say you receive your first warning but it takes you a week to make sure your network is secured, your kids aren't doing anything nefarious and whatnot... do you get a second or third warning if they pick you up again in that first week? What happens if you're innocent but your PC is hacked and is being used as a bot to download store and distribute stuff? This actually happened to one of our PCs in university (saw the dude trying to uninstall antimalware etc.) and we found a few gigs of movies and images on it - and this was back in 2004 so that was a lot of content.

Seems to me that the burden of proof is incredibly high for you to prove you weren't the one doing it or that your IP was being spoofed etc.

That's the whole problem with this setup -- that you can be punished for behavior that may be perfectly legal, and that Verizon is not in the position to determine the legality of your actions. Only courts can really do that.

And you have to pay $30 or $35 to appeal, and you get your money back if you win -- which means that the appeals process has a built-in motive to judge you guilty, because that's how they make money. If they say you're innocent, they don't get paid.

Edwin wrote:

It has begun.

That email was sent in October, so it's been going on for a good while, scary stuff really.

Do these "strikes" stay with you forever? So say I get the first strikes and don't get another strike for 6, 12, 24 months, will that be my second strike? Or will a "strike" go away after a grace period of said 6, 12, or 24 months?

Utterly ridiculous BTW. Especially the bit about paying a fee for contesting the "strikes".

fangblackbone wrote:

Do these "strikes" stay with you forever? So say I get the first strikes and don't get another strike for 6, 12, 24 months, will that be my second strike? Or will a "strike" go away after a grace period of said 6, 12, or 24 months?

They aren't saying.

A good comment by MrWilson on Techdirt:

I just got arrested yesterday because Ford reported to the cops that I drove my car to a neighborhood known for drug dealing. The cops didn't care that Ford had no proof that I was the one driving the car or that I actually did purchase and/or use drugs. They're not even bothering with a jury trial either. The fourth time I drove there, they made my car drive really slow, so now I'm always late for work. The next time they just suspended my license completely.