What the hell is wrong with Steubenville, OH?

Phoenix Rev wrote:

Color me NOT surprised.

Apparently, CNN reporter Poppy Harlow is shocked - SHOCKED! - that people are taking issue with her coverage of the Steubenville rapists:

Meanwhile two insiders at CNN exclusively told TheWrap that the controversy had hit reporter Poppy Harlow, covering the events in Steubenville, particularly hard.

“Poppy is taking this extremely personally as a woman,” said one executive. “She’s outraged that someone would think she’d do such a thing” as slant her coverage toward rapists. “It’s gotten so out of control.”

The outrage stemmed from Harlow standing outside the courtroom after the verdicts were read on Sunday, visibly moved by watching the young men collapse at the news of conviction. “I’ve never experienced anything like it,” she said on the air. “It’s incredibly emotional, even for an outsider like me. These two young men, with promising futures, star football players, A students, literally watched as their lives fell apart.”

She's outraged that someone would think she'd do such a thing?

Even though she did do such a thing.

Even though she did it again in her comments about doing it the first time.

Yonder wrote:
iaintgotnopants wrote:
Phoenix Rev wrote:

She's outraged that someone would think she'd do such a thing?

Even though she did do such a thing.

It just goes to show you that you need to be careful about what you videotape yourself doing and air on cable news.

Yeah, these news anchors today need to learn that documenting their every move can really backfire on you.

Oh, snap. I did a double-take before I caught what you did there, and... ouch.

If convicted, the hacker that exposed the crime faces 10 years in prison where as the rapists who actually committed the crime face 1-2 years. [Mother Jones]

Edwin wrote:

If convicted, the hacker that exposed the crime faces 10 years in prison where as the rapists who actually committed the crime face 1-2 years. [Mother Jones]

...what? *brain ragequits*

Stop the planet. I want off.

DSGamer wrote:

Stop the planet. I want off.

Hold the door for me.

Computer rape is much more important than when you rape... what do you call them? Females.

His use of twitter and instagram are quit different, if you read the article, where members of Anonymous hacked the football team's web page. If he was indeed involved in the hacking and vandalism, that is a crime.

The fact that the judicial system was rather lenient on a bunch of gang rapists is horrid. But federal crimes tend to carry very high penalties, even the nonviolent ones.

Yonder wrote:

Computer rape is much more important than when you rape... what do you call them? Females.

But doesn't the computer have ways to shut that whole business down?

KingGorilla wrote:

His use of twitter and instagram are quit different, if you read the article, where members of Anonymous hacked the football team's web page. If he was indeed involved in the hacking and vandalism, that is a crime.

The fact that the judicial system was rather lenient on a bunch of gang rapists is horrid. But federal crimes tend to carry very high penalties, even the nonviolent ones.

I get the differences in case levels for local/state versus federal... that doesn't make it make any more sense when you see the comparison between the two though.

That'd be like giving the Joker 5 years and Batman, for being a vigilante, life.

SpacePPoliceman wrote:
Yonder wrote:

Computer rape is much more important than when you rape... what do you call them? Females.

But doesn't the computer have ways to shut that whole business down?

Alt+F4?

SpacePPoliceman wrote:
Yonder wrote:

Computer rape is much more important than when you rape... what do you call them? Females.

But doesn't the computer have ways to shut that whole business down?

Only in legitimate cases of computer rape.

"Them hacker nerds ruined our football!"

Sadly, while I'm saying it in mockery, it's probably not far from the truth.

They should pin a medal on that guy.

Demosthenes wrote:
KingGorilla wrote:

His use of twitter and instagram are quit different, if you read the article, where members of Anonymous hacked the football team's web page. If he was indeed involved in the hacking and vandalism, that is a crime.

The fact that the judicial system was rather lenient on a bunch of gang rapists is horrid. But federal crimes tend to carry very high penalties, even the nonviolent ones.

I get the differences in case levels for local/state versus federal... that doesn't make it make any more sense when you see the comparison between the two though.

That'd be like giving the Joker 5 years and Batman, for being a vigilante, life.

I think the issue that should be focused on is the leniency that this county in Ohio showed to gang rapists. One got a year, the other got 2 years. That is a mockery and that is caving to pressure and preference. And this is a clear indication of why so many states went away from giving sentencing discretion in the first place.

Demosthenes wrote:
Edwin wrote:

If convicted, the hacker that exposed the crime faces 10 years in prison where as the rapists who actually committed the crime face 1-2 years. [Mother Jones]

...what? *brain ragequits*

I liked the part in the comments where it somehow became Obama's fault.

Bloo Driver wrote:
Demosthenes wrote:
Edwin wrote:

If convicted, the hacker that exposed the crime faces 10 years in prison where as the rapists who actually committed the crime face 1-2 years. [Mother Jones]

...what? *brain ragequits*

I liked the part in the comments where it somehow became Obama's fault.

I saw that and laughed so hard.

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/XmMYsKQ.gif)

KingGorilla wrote:

I think the issue that should be focused on is the leniency that this county in Ohio showed to gang rapists. One got a year, the other got 2 years. That is a mockery and that is caving to pressure and preference. And this is a clear indication of why so many states went away from giving sentencing discretion in the first place.

I agree. And possibly add re-examining the penalties for various computer crimes.
As horrid as the numbers seem side by side if he broke the law those are the consequences. And I imagine the words 'hacker' and 'anonymous' have a lot more to do with the FBIs motivation than football.

Unfortunately, I also think sentencing discretion (preferably better monitored) is important even if it sometimes works out badly just like I am all for a strong standard of proof even though it sometimes ends badly.

Interesting that Ms. Leber at Think Progress can't even get the name of the town right.

MacBrave wrote:

Interesting that Ms. Leber at Think Progress can't even get the name of the town right.

If the town isn't actually Elwood, I think that's perhaps more-accurately the fault of Tim Evans at the Indianapolis Star, whose piece, "An Elwood girl became pregnant in a sexual assault at 13, her case illustrates a growing problem in Indiana", the ThinkProgress article is referencing (it's the one linked to in the excerpt below).

The article at ThinkProgress[/url]]Now, a 14-year-old in Elwood, Indiana who is eight months pregnant faces ongoing harassment simply because her neighborhood sees her as a very young pregnant girl. But a reporter at the Indianapolis Star writes that her town does not know the full story of the 17-year-old boy who physically overpowered her after she told him “no.” On Tuesday, he faces sentencing for three counts of child molestation.

Dimmerswitch wrote:
MacBrave wrote:

Interesting that Ms. Leber at Think Progress can't even get the name of the town right.

If the town isn't actually Elwood, I think that's perhaps more-accurately the fault of Tim Evans at the Indianapolis Star, whose piece, "An Elwood girl became pregnant in a sexual assault at 13, her case illustrates a growing problem in Indiana", the ThinkProgress article is referencing (it's the one linked to in the excerpt below).

The article at ThinkProgress[/url]]Now, a 14-year-old in Elwood, Indiana who is eight months pregnant faces ongoing harassment simply because her neighborhood sees her as a very young pregnant girl. But a reporter at the Indianapolis Star writes that her town does not know the full story of the 17-year-old boy who physically overpowered her after she told him “no.” On Tuesday, he faces sentencing for three counts of child molestation.

It is Elwood, Indiana. Think Progress has corrected the article. When I read the article it said 'Eldwood'.

MacBrave wrote:

It is Elwood, Indiana. Think Progress has corrected the article. When I read the article it said 'Eldwood'.

Then I think I'm a little confused. Because a typo got past their copy editor and into the initially-published piece the author "can't even get the name of the town right"? It's not like the town name is at all an important part of the piece.

Oh -maybe you live in Eldwood? I could definitely see being upset about your town name being unfairly besmirched, if so. And ThinkProgress should apologize, and probably note when edits are made to a published piece - regardless of how trivial a correction might seem to the editor at the time, it's clearly reasonable for a town to not want their name dragged through the mud like that.

Dimmerswitch wrote:
MacBrave wrote:

It is Elwood, Indiana. Think Progress has corrected the article. When I read the article it said 'Eldwood'.

Then I think I'm a little confused. Because a typo got past their copy editor and into the initially-published piece the author "can't even get the name of the town right"? It's not like the town name is at all an important part of the piece.

Oh -maybe you live in Eldwood? I could definitely see being upset about your town name being unfairly besmirched, if so. And ThinkProgress should apologize, and probably note when edits are made to a published piece - regardless of how trivial a correction might seem to the editor at the time, it's clearly reasonable for a town to not want their name dragged through the mud like that.

I know of no town in Indiana named "Eldwood".

I think it's reasonable for the populace of an entire town to not want their name dragged through the mud due to the statements/actions of a few residents of that town.

MacBrave wrote:

I think it's reasonable for the populace of an entire town to not want their name dragged through the mud due to the statements/actions of a few residents of that town.

So your actual objection is something more along the lines of "what's happened to the young girl is deplorable, but the ThinkProgress synopsis unfairly paints the entire town of Elwood as being responsible for the actions of a few residents"?

That's a fair objection to make, if that's what you're saying - though it'd be really great to actually make it instead of elliptical statements that require this 20-questions style back and forth.

Dimmerswitch wrote:

That's a fair objection to make, if that's what you're saying - though it'd be really great to actually make it instead of elliptical statements that require this 20-questions style back and forth. :)

Don't pretend that a good game of forum password is not fun.

You know that saying about remaining silent?
I wonder how the story would be written if a significant number of people in town were decrying the action.

realityhack wrote:

You know that saying about remaining silent?
I wonder how the story would be written if a significant number of people in town were decrying the action.

This. Very much this, especially if instead of just decrying the hatestorm the girl has received, they banded together as, you know, a community and supported this girl so she can raise her child properly and still complete her own education.

realityhack wrote:

You know that saying about remaining silent?
I wonder how the story would be written if a significant number of people in town were decrying the action.

I'm not sure that's totally fair - we don't know (even from the Indianapolis Star piece) that there aren't folks in town decrying the harassment of a sexually-assaulted young girl.

If MacBrave's actual objection is that the ThinkProgress synopsis paints with too broad a brush, that seems pretty reasonable to me.