Geek Confessions & Blasphemies

Grubber788 wrote:

Geeks need to learn how to dress There is such a thing as geek chic. A Slayer t-shirt is not a part of that ensemble. Aim for Q

IMAGE(http://ideologyofmadness.spookyouthouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/theq.jpg)

grobstein wrote:

We're all dancing around a lie.
Several multi-national multibillion dollar media conglomerates can make a profit catering to an alleged subculture during their prime time slots. It's no longer a subculture.

Most of it no longer resembles what it's pretending to be. It starts to look every bit as stupid as ten million kids showing naval piercings through flannel shirts, adoring a radio station that plays only ten songs in constant rotation, and calling that swill an 'alternative' to some other swill. I almost wouldn't care except that it's time to remove "geek" and "nerd" from entirely from the conversation.

I've been saying things along this line for a minute now. For the past several years it seems like every new young actress is on a talk show touting how nerdy they were growing up because they liked Star Wars.

"I'm was such a nerd growing up. I mean, I was totally obsessed with a billion dollar global franchise!"

nel e nel wrote:
Grubber788 wrote:

Geeks need to learn how to dress There is such a thing as geek chic. A Slayer t-shirt is not a part of that ensemble. Aim for Q

IMAGE(http://ideologyofmadness.spookyouthouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/theq.jpg)

grobstein wrote:

We're all dancing around a lie.
Several multi-national multibillion dollar media conglomerates can make a profit catering to an alleged subculture during their prime time slots. It's no longer a subculture.

Most of it no longer resembles what it's pretending to be. It starts to look every bit as stupid as ten million kids showing naval piercings through flannel shirts, adoring a radio station that plays only ten songs in constant rotation, and calling that swill an 'alternative' to some other swill. I almost wouldn't care except that it's time to remove "geek" and "nerd" from entirely from the conversation.

I've been saying things along this line for a minute now. For the past several years it seems like every new young actress is on a talk show touting how nerdy they were growing up because they liked Star Wars.

"I'm was such a nerd growing up. I mean, I was totally obsessed with a billion dollar global franchise!"

Noob.

IMAGE(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/68/Prydonian.jpg/200px-Prydonian.jpg)

Grenn wrote:
trueheart78 wrote:

Gangnam-style? Seriously? This is a popular thing?
:old:

It beat Bieber in youtube and for that alone, it gets my respect. Also, its catchy.

Honestly not sure if I've heard a Bieber song, but I guarantee it's catchy as hell.

SixteenBlue wrote:
Grenn wrote:
trueheart78 wrote:

Gangnam-style? Seriously? This is a popular thing?
:old:

It beat Bieber in youtube and for that alone, it gets my respect. Also, its catchy.

Honestly not sure if I've heard a Bieber song, but I guarantee it's catchy as hell.

Retrieved from the bottom of the memepool. The only Bieber song to get my attention.

Firefly was not good and Joss Whedon is an overrated writer.

It occurs to me why I didn't like Firefly that much. It's not a bad show, really. But throughout the entire season, I never doubted the morality of any of the main characters. I feel like that makes for weak drama.

ccesarano wrote:

Justin Bieber is not the worst thing in the world. I really don't understand how the hatred for him is stronger than it was for N*Sync or Backstreet Boys.

I think that with the distance of years you may be forgetting just how strong the backlash against N Sync and the Backstreet Boys actually was. I remember it as being quite comparable to today's Bieber hate.

hbi2k wrote:
ccesarano wrote:

Justin Bieber is not the worst thing in the world. I really don't understand how the hatred for him is stronger than it was for N*Sync or Backstreet Boys.

I think that with the distance of years you may be forgetting just how strong the backlash against N Sync and the Backstreet Boys actually was. I remember it as being quite comparable to today's Bieber hate.

I dunno, I was at the perfect age and had a love for metal to speak loudly and proudly about how much those "bands sucked". The thing is, I was in middle and high school.

I'm seeing full grown adults in their 20's or 30's acting like I was when I was in my teens, and that's just disgraceful to me.

1. I love Babylon 5 if for no other reason than they would have main characters disappear due to, well, life/fate, and would return a season or two later. Just like, well, life/fate.

2. While I did like seeing two ST:TNG characters, I did hate the fact that final episode of ST:Enterprise used an old TNG plot line to further the episode.

3. I am sick of the Apple vs. PC war of words. If you like Apple, buy an Apple computer. If you like PC's, then buy a PC. Otherwise, the sniping has just become a boring exercise in prattle.

4. Although I do enjoy Steven Spielberg's work, I was very, very, very happy that he bowed out from being the director of the Harry Potter movie franchise. He wanted to make it an animated series and have it take place in New England with American actors. UGH.

5. Worf never did profess his love for me although I would have been up for a night of Klingon/human passion at his command.

Phoenix Rev wrote:

4. Although I do enjoy Steven Spielberg's work, I was very, very, very happy that he bowed out from being the director of the Harry Potter movie franchise. He wanted to make it an animated series and have it take place in New England with American actors. UGH.

I didn't realize that Spielberg was an early possibility, but I do remember reading the first couple of books and thinking at the time how great it was that this series wasn't tainted by commercialism. No action figures, no video games. Just good reading.

I feel this thread "angrier" than its gaming counterpart.

I feel ok enjoying the Big Bang theory, but I'll be the first to admit most jokes are hurtful and sometimes downright racist.

I've never cared enough about Dr. Who to find a place to start watching a 30 year old show.

A friend of mine had to drag me through 3 seasons of Buffy before I got hooked. I thank him every time I see him.

Dollhouse was painful to look at. God knows I tried to like it.

I'm loving the Walking Dead and I have no ill intent against my neighbors. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

I thought Battle Star Gallactica was a terrible, incoherent, plot ridden mess. I couldn't get enough of it. I just couldn't take how little the writers cared of sub plots and just ignored them. Sometimes the following episode.

ccesarano wrote:
Phoenix Rev wrote:

2. While I did like seeing two ST:TNG characters, I did hate the fact that final episode of ST:Enterprise used an old TNG plot line to further the episode.

I feel like the greater confession here is that you watched Star Trek: Enterprise all the way up to the final episode.

Hobbes2099 wrote:

A friend of mine had to drag me through 3 seasons of Buffy before I got hooked. I thank him every time I see him.

Dollhouse was painful to look at. God knows I tried to like it.

Season FOUR is where you got hooked? That's the season that turned me off to the show. I enjoyed the first three seasons, but then the fourth was a 100% focus on Buffy and "Oh, being a freshman in College is just so hard for a young woman!", at least at the start, and I just couldn't do it.

Season 4 did have Willow with the cute short hair. Also waaaay less mousy. But season 3 had hands down the greatest villain to ever grace the Whedonverse, The Mayor. He was omnipresent, yet never pretentious. I loved every minute he was on screen because he never failed to entertain. Just him talking blithely about fiber whilst eating a giant cockroach was funny as hell. The later seasons' villains just couldn't compare.

Phoenix Rev wrote:

2. While I did like seeing two ST:TNG characters, I did hate the fact that final episode of ST:Enterprise used an old TNG plot line to further the episode.

I feel like the greater confession here is that you watched Star Trek: Enterprise all the way up to the final episode.

Hobbes2099 wrote:

A friend of mine had to drag me through 3 seasons of Buffy before I got hooked. I thank him every time I see him.

Dollhouse was painful to look at. God knows I tried to like it.

Season FOUR is where you got hooked? That's the season that turned me off to the show. I enjoyed the first three seasons, but then the fourth was a 100% focus on Buffy and "Oh, being a freshman in College is just so hard for a young woman!", at least at the start, and I just couldn't do it.

Season four love interest looks like a good Leon S. Kennedy, though.

But that builds into Dollhouse, where Joss Whedon loves to pretend he's a feminist (at least, pretend to be a commendable one), yet when he makes a woman the front and center main protagonist they're always boring and even annoying. However, while Buffy was constantly interacting with more interesting characters like Giles and Xander and Willow, Echo was mostly on her own and thus the first several episodes of both seasons were "What is Echo's latest adventure?" And that was the most bland, boring part of it. This is probably why I felt the end of season one was so blah. Alpha theoretically provided an interesting villain, but his motivation was nothing more than to elevate Echo.

His "bad ass" female protagonists are bland and boring, and it takes a while before Dollhouse starts paying attention to all the more interesting people.

EDIT:

Guess I have a new one to add.

Alien 3 may not be the best in the series, but it remains my favorite. I think the setting of the film makes the characters and the drama between them interesting more than the first or second Alien films. The first Alien is the best, but all the characters are just regular folk. They all fulfill an archetype necessary for the story. Aliens has the most unbelievable marines ever that mostly bite it in the only real big action sequence of the film where you barely get a good look at the creature. In fact, the title creature is barely in the movie at all. It's all about how military people suck (?) or something.

Alien 3 throws a xenomorph into a prison that is also technically a rehabilitation center where a bunch of double-Y chromosome criminals have found God and are trying to repent for their sins. Oh, and now there's a woman there, too, and she happens to have to deal with the fact that an Alien, the creature she's been fighting this whole time, is inside of her.

The fact that the film had such a Hell of development is amazing, and I find it as a testament to David Fincher's talent that he managed to pull it off.

I don't care if everyone was promised a movie where there would be Aliens attacking Earth or whatever other stupid disappointment you have. Alien 3 is interesting, has an interesting setting, has good and fascinating drama between the characters, and it actually has the alien in it. The alien is a driving force to the chaos and plot, as opposed to Aliens where...well, they're kind of there. Sometimes. Doing stuff.

hbi2k wrote:
ccesarano wrote:

Justin Bieber is not the worst thing in the world. I really don't understand how the hatred for him is stronger than it was for N*Sync or Backstreet Boys.

I think that with the distance of years you may be forgetting just how strong the backlash against N Sync and the Backstreet Boys actually was. I remember it as being quite comparable to today's Bieber hate.

Given that Marky Mark and Donnie Walberg are chasing Oscars, Emmys, and Golden Globes, I figure that some day Bieber or those One Direction kids will be as well.

KingGorilla wrote:
hbi2k wrote:
ccesarano wrote:

Justin Bieber is not the worst thing in the world. I really don't understand how the hatred for him is stronger than it was for N*Sync or Backstreet Boys.

I think that with the distance of years you may be forgetting just how strong the backlash against N Sync and the Backstreet Boys actually was. I remember it as being quite comparable to today's Bieber hate.

Given that Marky Mark and Donnie Walberg are chasing Oscars, Emmys, and Golden Globes, I figure that some day Bieber or those One Direction kids will be as well.

Justin Timberlake's developed into a guy with a seemingly great sense of humor and had his part in an oscar-domianting movie, too.

Nicholaas wrote:

I thought Christopher Eccleston was a better Doctor than David Tennant. Just sayin'.

Totally agree. Eccleston was great. Too bad he only did one season.

cheesycrouton wrote:
Nicholaas wrote:

I thought Christopher Eccleston was a better Doctor than David Tennant. Just sayin'.

Totally agree. Eccleston was great. Too bad he only did one season.

Agreed, though I still think that the 2nd/7th/11th Doctor type, the shabby hobo/clown, is more my style.

Bard is the lamest character class in D&D / Pathfinder.
I can't figure out why people like it so much. Isn't the Monty Python parody of it testament enough?
My ideal swords and sorcery fantasy world is gritty and dangerous. A lot like 13th warrior. It's meritorious. I don't see fighting and adventurous types lending any credit or value to someone who sings while everyone else is getting their brains spilled by bludgeoning weapons.

What do real world infantry think of the reporters along with them?
Do they resent being sent on "cosmetic assignments" while babysitting? This is how I imagine what actually happens. No government or military leader is going to let things turn out poorly on record.

I don't like Harry Potter for much the same reason. Witches with wands was never what I aspired to in my imagination. It's just a little too kiddy, and I can't understand how it affected an adult audience; though I'll add I couldn't get throug more than about fifteen minutes of the original movie. I know, read a book, right?

Grenn wrote:

Season 4 did have Willow with the cute short hair. Also waaaay less mousy. But season 3 had hands down the greatest villain to ever grace the Whedonverse, The Mayor. He was omnipresent, yet never pretentious. I loved every minute he was on screen because he never failed to entertain. Just him talking blithely about fiber whilst eating a giant cockroach was funny as hell. The later seasons' villains just couldn't compare.

The key to realize, of course, is that Buffy is far and away the worst, blandest, least interesting character in the Buffy-verse. All the Scoobies are more interesting, all the big bads are more interesting, most of the background fill wandering the streets are more interesting. I think Buffy-minus-Buffy would be fantastic.

EDIT: Oh, and I might go with Adam as the most interesting big bad, though Glory was my favourite.

The Mayor's my favorite. He was so gosh-darned nice about being evil.

Chumpy_McChump wrote:
Grenn wrote:

Season 4 did have Willow with the cute short hair. Also waaaay less mousy. But season 3 had hands down the greatest villain to ever grace the Whedonverse, The Mayor. He was omnipresent, yet never pretentious. I loved every minute he was on screen because he never failed to entertain. Just him talking blithely about fiber whilst eating a giant cockroach was funny as hell. The later seasons' villains just couldn't compare.

The key to realize, of course, is that Buffy is far and away the worst, blandest, least interesting character in the Buffy-verse. All the Scoobies are more interesting, all the big bads are more interesting, most of the background fill wandering the streets are more interesting. I think Buffy-minus-Buffy would be fantastic.

EDIT: Oh, and I might go with Adam as the most interesting big bad, though Glory was my favourite.

I can get behind that. She was infuriating in season 7 when she gave out ultimatums. And somehow the universe always warped itself so that she's always "right" in the end.

Stengah wrote:

The Mayor's my favorite. He was so gosh-darned nice about being evil.

I mean, what's the point of ruing the world if you're not regular?

Chumpy_McChump wrote:

The key to realize, of course, is that Buffy is far and away the worst, blandest, least interesting character in the Buffy-verse. All the Scoobies are more interesting, all the big bads are more interesting, most of the background fill wandering the streets are more interesting. I think Buffy-minus-Buffy would be fantastic.

This is absolutely the truth. A large part of why the 6th and 7th seasons were not great was the heavy focus on Buffy at the expense of the supporting cast.

It's one of several reasons why I prefer Angel the series as Angel turned out better as a main character. I wouldn't have expected that given that I didn't care for Angel at all when he was on Buffy, but it turns out that Angel is a fine character when he's not just there to be a prop for Buffy. Go figure.

Is preferring Angel the Series to BtVS a geek confession?

Also, the Mayor is the greatest big bad for sure.

Later seasons of Buffy are not a great gauge of the show--seasons 6 and 7 are among the worst stretches of a show I've ever beheld.

Demyx wrote:

Is preferring Angel the Series to BtVS a geek confession?

No, it's an acknowledgement of taste.

Keithustus wrote:

Lord of the Rings, both novels and films, are CRAP. Thank you, J.R.R. for almost singlehandedly creating a whole genre, introducing dozens of tropes like monster names, etc. into popular culture, but why is your writing itself so amateurish and bad? For good writing in fantasy, stick to the folks who perfected Tolkein's feeble attempts at narrative these settings, like Terry Goodkimd, David Eddings, etc.

...

A bearded man in NYC shed a single tear. His lips, thin with grief, spat hatred with a sigh.

oMonarca wrote:

A bearded man in NYC shed a single tear. His lips, thin with grief, spat hatred with a sigh.

Nah, I shaved this morning.

Gott damn it!

Tanglebones wrote:
oMonarca wrote:

A bearded man in NYC shed a single tear. His lips, thin with grief, spat hatred with a sigh.

Nah, I shaved this morning.

However, I am available for all of your NYC bearded tear-shedding needs. Rates negotiable. I do birthday parties. Spit hatred w/ or w/o sigh.

Lord of the Rings, both novels and films, are CRAP. Thank you, J.R.R. for almost singlehandedly creating a whole genre, introducing dozens of tropes like monster names, etc. into popular culture, but why is your writing itself so amateurish and bad? For good writing in fantasy, stick to the folks who perfected Tolkein's feeble attempts at narrative these settings, like Terry Goodkimd, David Eddings, etc.

Star Trek: Enterprise--barring certain episodes--was really good.. Earth on its first interstellar exploration: awesome. A captain who has to make tough calls without hundreds of years of Kantian precedent: awesome. Making the stories of the first season deliberately hamstrung to show the ineptitude of doing it the first time: awesome. Piecing together some well-crafted episodes in episode 4 to tie together questions haunting TOS and TNG, such as the Klingons' appearance: awesome. ...it's just too bad that no one watched the final two seasons.. If you have to watch one episode of Enterprise, see "Twilight", from season 3. It's easily in the top-10 episodes of all Star Trek.

Edit: Now that I'm reading this thread from the beginning, I see there is a lot of discussion, mostly negative, to Big Bang Theory and other science-y shows. I've not seen that one, but from the promos I don't want to. Anyway, [b]by far the best science show I've seen is Regenesis,[/b] which is Canadian, so I don't know how I found it, probably by imdbing Ellen Page after seeing Juno. The show centers around a laboratory created by the collaboration between Canada, the US, and Mexico, whose purpose is to combat bioterrorism. Most episodes have some sort of unexplained symptoms somewhere, to which the scientists must travel to collect samples, identify, and determine some kind of response. My scientific training is not in any of the related sciences, but they do a much better job of actually using the scientific method and having real research challenges than CSI, Cold Case, etc. It of course has some science-fictiony bits but is mostly a believable today, especially when the focus is on inter-governmental friction and homeland security type problems making the science harder. For the generation of viewers obsessed with ER, Scrubs, etc. that have to have the characters have life outside of work, there is a bit of that, too, mostly concentrating on the lead researcher's relationship with his daughter, who stays with him sometimes and sometimes with his ex-wife in the US. You can find it pretty easily on Amazon or, reportedly, Hulu.