Geek Confessions & Blasphemies

IT crowd is not that funny.

I like the characters, I like to watch it, I often quote from the series (especially the turning it off and on again of course), but it made me laugh maybe 2 to 3 times throughout all episodes.

I'm not built for comedy thriving on embarrassment.

The Office just makes me cringe. There's no equivalent expression in English, but we call it 'plaatsvervangende schaamte' or 'place-replacing embarrassment'. I feel ashamed for the characters, never amused.

Again I see why people adore it, but it's not for me.

I'm tired of zombies and the apocalypse as subject matter (although I still will watch/play things like that if they're good enough).

I wish geekery had more optimistic futurism.

dejanzie wrote:

I'm not built for comedy thriving on embarrassment.

The Office just makes me cringe. There's no equivalent expression in English, but we call it 'plaatsvervangende schaamte' or 'place-replacing embarrassment'. I feel ashamed for the characters, never amused.

Again I see why people adore it, but it's not for me.

This seems more a general confession. Maybe it's the same thing, but I know I've come to hate "Schadenfreude humor" as I like to call it. Funny considering my tag, but when you take a movie like, say, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, which seems to exist for no greater purpose but to laugh at the misfortune of the protagonist, then I just can't get into it.

It's one of the reasons I can't stand that there are so many sequels to Meet the Parents. It's all about everything that could possibly go wrong to this one guy going wrong, and that's supposed to be funny. Sure, the film may have its moments, but it just makes me hate the protagonist for taking everyone else's sh*t, or making the stupid decisions that lead to a continuing spiral of misery, while hating all the other characters for being passive about it or helping to inflict it.

Demyx wrote:

I wish geekery had more optimistic futurism.

For as much as people love Star Trek you'd think there'd be a lot more idealistic "imagine a world without racism and prejudice".

Though I found out a lot of the writers were frustrated with Roddenberry for not being able to have conflict between the main characters until the man died during Next Generation. It's a bit fascinating to think about, that some people favor later seasons of Next Generation, after Roddenberry's idealistic vision of "everyone gets along in the Federation" was slightly reduced to make for dramatic conflict between characters. Does it say something about the quality (or lack thereof) of the writers? Or a problem in what people find entertaining?

ccesarano wrote:

Though I found out a lot of the writers were frustrated with Roddenberry for not being able to have conflict between the main characters until the man died during Next Generation. It's a bit fascinating to think about, that some people favor later seasons of Next Generation, after Roddenberry's idealistic vision of "everyone gets along in the Federation" was slightly reduced to make for dramatic conflict between characters. Does it say something about the quality (or lack thereof) of the writers? Or a problem in what people find entertaining?

I think the later seasons of Next Gen made for more interesting TV, but I didn't like how Starfleet changed into the same crooked politicians and military we've got now, just in space. I think it was a problem with both the writers and the audience.

I like NASCAR both for the technology discussions and the fisticuffs.

I don't particularly like Wolverine. I like Cyclops.

Every time I see these discussions, I see a marked difference between two groups. One says, "I did not enjoy Firefly." The other says, "Firefly was a terrible show." I understand there's not a huge difference between the two, but I immediately recoil when I see the latter.

For a much more detailed example, see the entire Mass Effect 3 Spoiler thread.

As for my confession, I loved the original ending to Mass Effect 3 and wish they hadn't changed a thing.

I endorse the following comments:

stryk187 wrote:

I think Twitter is ignorant, wholly undignified, and possibly the beginning of the end for civilized society.

SixteenBlue wrote:

I really don't like the common nerdy internet mashup art.

karmajay wrote:

I really enjoyed Matrix 2 and Matrix 3.

Joss Whedon is very hit or miss with me. Firefly and Avengers good, Cabin in the Woods ok, Buffy/Angel and Dr Horrible can go jump up my butt.

I forced myself to watch the entirety of the new Battlestar Galactica and can't see what the fuss is all about.

I have a very un-geeklike attitude towards "we did it because we can!" projects. The type of project where you're maybe recreating the Hanging Gardens of Babylon in Minecraft, or building a Turing machine out of celery, packing tape and shelving brackets. My response should be "how cool and impressive!" but it's usually "man, you should get out more."

trichy wrote:

I loved the original ending to Mass Effect 3 and refuse to acknowledge they released an extended ending.

Fixed to be relevant to me.

I don't think the problem was the ending, it was everything leading up to it. I like the ending. I like what they did with it. The problem is that the writers needed to focus on the end being more fitting for the story while they wrote the story.

stryk187 wrote:

I think Twitter is ignorant, wholly undignified, and possibly the beginning of the end for civilized society.

It can be all of those things.

Or if you just pay careful attention to who you follow it can be a very useful tool, and at times can be fun. Like many other things whether Twitter works for you depends on who you surround yourself with and how you choose to use it.

For my own confession

I really don't like Nintendo
Nothing about what they do or how they do it has held any value to me since the SNES. There's Super Mario World and Super Metroid and then a giant many year stretch of Meh right up until now.

Here's an odd (and ancient) confession that I only just now remembered.

I couldn't have cared less about the Buffy the Vampire Slayer TV series until I played the BtVS game for the original XBOX. After that I watched and loved the whole series, including the Angel spin-off. Bonus oddness: The game was okay, but it wasn't exactly all that great. Totally inexplicable.

Like others, I think Big Bang Theory is awful. Chuck Lorre's name being on a show pretty much guarantees I won't find it funny.

I used to love Seth MacFarlane shows but now think they're awful. I don't know why it happened but one day, I just realised that constantly pointing at things and telling people they should laugh is not actually writing comedy, it's just being lazy. Combine that with the fact that I can't stand product placement and his shows are all but ads with jokes interspersed now and I gave up. I sold all my Family Guy and American Dad seasons that I had on DVD and haven't watched any of his stuff since. I don't miss it.

I actually didn't mind Babylon 5 season 5 that much. It's the weakest by far but I still thought it was OK and the thing that happens to the place at the end actually choked me up a bit. That said, I think Michael O'Hare is a hideous actor (at least playing Sinclair) and he makes season 1 almost unwatchable for me.

I love the Star Wars prequels but they're not very well written or acted. I've seen the original trilogy probably 25 times and I still think they're amazing films and love the world Lucas created. But in reality, they're not very well written with a lot of corny dialogue that I don't think was purposeful and the acting's pretty bad. A lot of that was because it was first time actors (I think Harrison Ford was originally a set builder or something) and the films had almost no budget but I think if stuff like this was released today and didn't have the flash of first-gen computer graphics, they would get critically panned and not meet with mainstream success. That's kind of sad as well really.

Apple stuff isn't all that. Bet no one here knew I thought this! I actually think their hardware is well made (but needlessly expensive) and though their OS isn't my cup of tea (and also not nearly as more reliable as people say), I totally understand anyone who prefers it. However, Apple fanboys (by which I don't mean Apple users but actual fanboys, the ones who constantly need to remind the world that they use Apple products) are more obnoxious than any console or sci-fi fanboy I've seen. If you choose to use Apple, good on you. If you constantly need to remind the world that you're better than people who don't, you suck. A surprising number of people who I otherwise respect the opinions and writing of do this frequently. I once recommended a PC upgrade to a customer of mine who has used PCs for years and didn't want to learn a new system. Her daughter (in her 30s and dressed in what many would call hipster clothes) was in the room and proceeded to lecture me about how she should be using a Mac and how I was basically trying to rip her off and create work for myself by selling her a PC instead. I looked at my client (who I've known for years) and she gave me the nod to retort. That was fun. There are junky PCs but that people choose to buy the $399 eMachine a lot isn't the fault of PCs, it's the fault of people being cheap and stupid. For anyone who wants to know what hardcore Apple life is really like, follow @applenag. He's a guy who has been Apple 4 Life since 1984 but when he runs into problems, he doesn't sugar coat them.

Windows Phone is the best mobile OS by a country mile. I've used iOS stuff plenty and my girlfriend recently bought a Galaxy S3 which I played with a bunch, then she exchanged it for a Lumia 920 because the S3's camera is poor and she's a photo nut. We are both absolutely stunned by Windows Phone. Now, the app situation is dire I admit (not a big deal for her) and it's very much a walled garden system like iOS but from a user experience and performance perspective, it's incredible. iOS always kind of looked outdated and inefficient to me and Windows Phone destroys it in that category. Microsoft tends to dig into things for the long haul and I really hope they can make Windows Phone a viable competitor. When I can some day justify getting off my employer's subsidised rate plan and finally dump this BlackBerry for a new phone, I'm going Windows Phone without a doubt unless something major happens with one of the others.

I also agree with a lot of the negative things said about Twitter but I still use it every day. Like others said, it's about carefully managing your feed so that you don't have to read any stupidity you don't want to. It can be a lot of work though and I totally understand anyone who can't be bothered to do it.

Joss Whedon is not a feminist. He is a man with a fetish.

He does not include a 90-lb teenage girl doing kung fu in everything he does because the women of the Western world need a chubby geek-darling writer/director to be their White Knight and empower them. He does it because he gets off on it.

Not hating on the man's work, you understand. I think that's FINE. Creators should make things that appeal to them. He just needs to own it and quit talking like it's part of some grand feminist crusade.

But he sure can write some punchy dialog.

I thought Christopher Eccleston was a better Doctor than David Tennant. Just sayin'.

dejanzie wrote:

I'm not built for comedy thriving on embarrassment.

The Office just makes me cringe. There's no equivalent expression in English, but we call it 'plaatsvervangende schaamte' or 'place-replacing embarrassment'. I feel ashamed for the characters, never amused.

Again I see why people adore it, but it's not for me.

If someone does something in a tv show or movie that publicly embarrass themselves, I turn it off or change the channel until it goes away, but I've never done that for The Office and love the few episodes I've seen.
Perhaps I should reflect on which type of embarrassment I'm talking about. I don't like faux pas maybe?

Nicholaas wrote:

I thought Christopher Eccleston was a better Doctor than David Tennant. Just sayin'.

Not sure completely I agree, but I was rather unhappy to see Eccleston's darker take on The Doctor not last beyond the first season. It took several episodes before I warmed up to DT's doctor.

KingGorilla wrote:

Most classic Disney movies and just about every Matt and Trey movie is a musical. I think the issue is that a lot of musicals on screen suck (I am looking at you Johnny Depp).

I thought Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street with Johnny Depp was great!

Garden Ninja wrote:

I think the old Doctor Who is stupid and boring. Granted, I only watched 2 or 3 episodes, but they were painful to watch. Bad acting, bad writing, bad stories, and terrible effects. Not that effects are everything, but you your ideas need to match your budget and execution. If I'm laughing at the dumb handpuppet, it just rips me out of the show.

This is what I'm saying. It's entirely understandable, loving Dr Who means embracing the crap. This newfound love for it across the Atlantic confuses the crap out of me. It's such a British thing.

dejanzie wrote:

I'm not built for comedy thriving on embarrassment.

The Office just makes me cringe. There's no equivalent expression in English, but we call it 'plaatsvervangende schaamte' or 'place-replacing embarrassment'. I feel ashamed for the characters, never amused.

Well the term is "Cringe Comedy" so you're in the right ballpark. I don't think that's a geek thing at all. I'm not a huge fan myself - it's often funny but I can't bear the embarrassment. Too empathic I guess.

But on the subject of stuff not crossing the Atlantic, I saw an article the other day clamiing the US remake of The Office was better than the UK version because in the UK everything is bleak and nobody gets what they want but the US one is sweetly sentimental and things go right for people.

Until that moment I'd never wanted to drag an article to an underground carpark by its ears and bludgeon it to death with a tire iron before.

I think a lot of geeks celebrate the "culture" to a fault. Being well-rounded, and having interests in things that other people can relate to is a good thing. Being obsessed about a certain facet of geek culture is off-putting.

I like Big Bang Theory. I think geeks get too up-in-arms about the show. It's not mocking geek culture--it's mocking socially-awkward people. Geeks could learn some lessons--albeit heavy-handed ones--from the show.

Firefly was kind of boring Not a very deep show. A ship full of Han Solos. Black and white antagonists. Heehaw.

I don't get Dr. Who. I've tried. Can't be bothered to stick with it. Too British for my tastes maybe?

If you are a computer programmer or are in IT and start talking about your Libertarian principles, I will not pay attention. Sorry. I just don't want to hear about the Ron Paul revolution anymore.

Geeks need to learn how to dress There is such a thing as geek chic. A Slayer t-shirt is not a part of that ensemble. Aim for Q from Skyfall. Otherwise, what are you trying to accomplish? Also, don't wear a fedora. EVER.

I despise manga and am glad that there are alternatives to it out there in the graphic novel space.

Maq wrote:

This is what I'm saying. It's entirely understandable, loving Dr Who means embracing the crap. This newfound love for it across the Atlantic confuses the crap out of me. It's such a British thing.

As of late I've noticed a lot of folks falling in love with Britishness more. I have a sense their idea of "Britishness" is pretty inaccurate (most of the time it's accents and more Victorian era style), but as you also have folks like Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg starting to get more well known over here it could just be that people are more aware. In fact, Top Gear being such a huge show in the States seems to help that notion (and also help explain the episode where fans voted Ford as best car manufacturer and the hosts simply said "You're wrong". If they had that many Americans voting in, I honestly wouldn't be surprised if they actually voted a company like Ford).

I dunno. I've watched the first few episodes of the new Doctor Who, and while I wasn't repulsed by it I just couldn't get caught up in it. Not because of the campiness or weirdness, I just...I dunno. I liked it, didn't love it.

But on the subject of stuff not crossing the Atlantic, I saw an article the other day clamiing the US remake of The Office was better than the UK version because in the UK everything is bleak and nobody gets what they want but the US one is sweetly sentimental and things go right for people.

Until that moment I'd never wanted to drag an article to an underground carpark by its ears and bludgeon it to death with a tire iron before.

I wasn't much a fan of either version of The Office so take that as you will, but I imagine the whole point of the British one wasn't to have a bunch of fun and quirky characters that happen to be in an office setting but to drive a point home that office work is miserable and existentially meaningless?

I can totally see that as a thing Brits are more willing to accept than Americans.

If you are a computer programmer or are in IT and start talking about your Libertarian principles, I will not pay attention. Sorry. I just don't want to hear about the Ron Paul revolution anymore.

I don't think that has anything to do with being a programmer or in IT, considering my friends that are the most certain about the Libertarian revolution. However, I do blame them for making me feel dirty whenever I vote that way. Just because I happen to agree with Libertarians more often than the Republicans or Democrats doesn't mean I think everything they say is a good idea. In fact, I'm pretty sure Ron Paul is becoming senile.

Geeks need to learn how to dress There is such a thing as geek chic. A Slayer t-shirt is not a part of that ensemble. Aim for Q from Skyfall. Otherwise, what are you trying to accomplish? Also, don't wear a fedora. EVER.

But...but....where will Minarchist get his pizzazz? D:

A good movie has a good script. People who claim a movie is worth seeing only for explosions or special effects are wrong, and are encouraging Hollywood to make dumb movies. (Prometheus, Transformers, Expendables, etc.) Yes yes yes, I know some people like "dumb" movies. I hate them.

lostlobster wrote:

A good movie has a good script. People who claim a movie is worth seeing only for explosions or special effects are wrong, and are encouraging Hollywood to make dumb movies. (Prometheus, Transformers, Expendables, etc.) Yes yes yes, I know some people like "dumb" movies. I hate them.

A tenuous to non-existent story is only part of the problem. I'd argue that the majority of bad film is most often the result of bad post production editing than from any other single aspect of the film making process.

My confession? I think modern 3D has to be one of the most poorly and pointlessly implemented technologies in the history of film making. I still hold out hope that 3D may find better use in games and other entertainment formats.

Gangnam-style? Seriously? This is a popular thing?

trueheart78 wrote:

Gangnam-style? Seriously? This is a popular thing?
:old:

It beat Bieber in youtube and for that alone, it gets my respect. Also, its catchy.

Grenn wrote:
trueheart78 wrote:

Gangnam-style? Seriously? This is a popular thing?
:old:

It beat Bieber in youtube and for that alone, it gets my respect. Also, its catchy.

Anything beating Bieber has my respect. Even that stupid kesha woman lol

mudbunny wrote:

Daft Punk I find merely meh. Apart from a couple of their songs that stand out, the rest all blur together as one giant sameness, kinda like Nickleback.

You should see what their Discovery album looks like in DJ'ing software. It's all one giant sameness, kinda like Nickelback.

They are still not as bad as Fatboy Slim.

grobstein wrote:

I like geeky things, but I hate anything that feels like it's consciously aimed at a "geek" demographic.

This is kind of in line with what I came to say.

I don't watch television.
"OMG, did you see that latest Geek TV NBCBSPN show?"
No. I didn't. I was doing things.

We're all dancing around a lie.
Several multi-national multibillion dollar media conglomerates can make a profit catering to an alleged subculture during their prime time slots. It's no longer a subculture.

Most of it no longer resembles what it's pretending to be. It starts to look every bit as stupid as ten million kids showing naval piercings through flannel shirts, adoring a radio station that plays only ten songs in constant rotation, and calling that swill an 'alternative' to some other swill. I almost wouldn't care except that it's time to remove "geek" and "nerd" from entirely from the conversation.

RolandofGilead wrote:
dejanzie wrote:

I'm not built for comedy thriving on embarrassment.

The Office just makes me cringe. There's no equivalent expression in English, but we call it 'plaatsvervangende schaamte' or 'place-replacing embarrassment'. I feel ashamed for the characters, never amused.

Again I see why people adore it, but it's not for me.

If someone does something in a tv show or movie that publicly embarrass themselves, I turn it off or change the channel until it goes away, but I've never done that for The Office and love the few episodes I've seen.
Perhaps I should reflect on which type of embarrassment I'm talking about. I don't like faux pas maybe?

This is a good one for me too. I can't stand comedy that relies on awkward situations to create humour. A lot do so I think I'm just not wired for it. Or maybe it's because I don't handle real life awkwardness well at all.

Grenn wrote:
trueheart78 wrote:

Gangnam-style? Seriously? This is a popular thing?
:old:

It beat Bieber in youtube and for that alone, it gets my respect. Also, its catchy.

Also this. I normally hate that kind of manufactured pop but something about it just makes me smile.

Regarding the whole return of British mania in the US, for the most part I don't have a problem with it. But this is what gets me:

Americans should not be so obsessed with royalty. According to my British friends living here in America, they're amazed at how star struck Yanks get when it comes to Kate Middleton, royal weddings, etc. And too often Americans embrace the whole fairy tale aspect of things, ignoring the ugly underbelly of the aristocratic system.

Parallax Abstraction wrote:
Grenn wrote:
trueheart78 wrote:

Gangnam-style? Seriously? This is a popular thing?
:old:

It beat Bieber in youtube and for that alone, it gets my respect. Also, its catchy.

Also this. I normally hate that kind of manufactured pop but something about it just makes me smile.

My friend and I watched Gangnam style, then looked at each other and said "Maybe we're just used to the Internet." Then we put on Yatta and were proven wrong. I basically didn't get Gangnam style.

Maybe I still don't as the song is pretty bland, but when I went to Escapist Expo and it was everywhere I started to understand more. I think.

But as for my next confession, though I'm not sure it's Geek...

Justin Bieber is not the worst thing in the world. I really don't understand how the hatred for him is stronger than it was for N*Sync or Backstreet Boys. He's a tool of the record company to sell records to young girls that don't know any better.

So f*cking what? It's happened before and will happen again. Thing is, when I go roller blading at the rink and they play this stupid music, I don't get why people make a big deal. Is it trite? Is it boring? Yes. Is Call Me Maybe really a God awful song? No more than Britney Spears or Christina Aguilera were.

And God dammit, Rebecca Black's "Friday" was no different substance-wise than Black Eyed Peas' "Tonight's Gonna Be A Good Night", and I'd go so far as to say the latter is a dumber and worse song.

I actually kinda like Justin Bieber, especially back when I thought he was a girl.