Geek Confessions & Blasphemies

ringsnort wrote:

Ugh. Now "Chuck" is insulting. It offends both my geek cred and my national security wonkery.

As I feel it has not a lot of serious stuff to say on either subject it doesn't bother me in the slightest. I also find it surprisingly sweet.

Maq wrote:
ringsnort wrote:

Ugh. Now "Chuck" is insulting. It offends both my geek cred and my national security wonkery.

As I feel it has not a lot of serious stuff to say on either subject it doesn't bother me in the slightest. I also find it surprisingly sweet.

Also, Yvonne Strahovski.. mrrrowr.

Tanglebones wrote:
Maq wrote:
ringsnort wrote:

Ugh. Now "Chuck" is insulting. It offends both my geek cred and my national security wonkery.

As I feel it has not a lot of serious stuff to say on either subject it doesn't bother me in the slightest. I also find it surprisingly sweet.

Also, Yvonne Strahovski.. mrrrowr.

Distracted by eye candy yet again... sigh.

Bonus_Eruptus wrote:
athros wrote:

I liked the TV Show Chuck.

This is neither a confession nor blasphemy.

ringsnort wrote:
Tanglebones wrote:
Maq wrote:
ringsnort wrote:

Ugh. Now "Chuck" is insulting. It offends both my geek cred and my national security wonkery.

As I feel it has not a lot of serious stuff to say on either subject it doesn't bother me in the slightest. I also find it surprisingly sweet.

Also, Yvonne Strahovski.. mrrrowr.

Distracted by eye candy yet again... sigh.

See what I mean, Bonus_Eruptus

Demyx wrote:

I dislike that in order to be a geek you apparently have to know/like every single geek thing in existence.

I don't have the time or inclination to watch that much TV.

This ties in with my confession/blasphemy:
I do not subscribe to cable, Netflix, Amazon Prime, or Hulu Plus. The only series I watch are Warehouse 13 via the free version of Hulu, and The Walking Dead via Amazon's Season Pass.

Stengah wrote:
Demyx wrote:

I dislike that in order to be a geek you apparently have to know/like every single geek thing in existence.

I don't have the time or inclination to watch that much TV.

This ties in with my confession/blasphemy:
I do not subscribe to cable, Netflix, Amazon Prime, or Hulu Plus. The only series I watch are Warehouse 13 via the free version of Hulu, and The Walking Dead via Amazon's Season Pass.

Some might call this... smart? Wise? Meh. TV takes too much time away from gaming anyway.

1. I fail to understand the clamor for Nathan Fillion to be in everything.
He wasn't even the best part of FireFly (that would be Adam Baldwin, character-wise — not going to argue about the ladies).

2. I got bored watching FireFly via NetFlix and can't really blame FOX for cancelling it.
Don't think I made it further than half way.

shoptroll wrote:

Also, Rose can go die in a fire. Utterly insufferable character.

Not nearly as bad as Donna. Holy hell was that a terrible season, made even worse because the writers really seemed to like her (I guess because the actress was popular in the UK before Dr. Who?). Doctor Donna was probably the most annoying thing in the series, but at least it meant that Donna was going away. Compared to that, Rose is only mildly annoying because her storyline was so important to the series (the whole Bad Wolf thing). I liked Martha, and was kind of disappointed that she left after a season, but Amy and Rory are great. That's part of why I like the 11th Doctor best.

Which brings me to my confessions:

Despite loving the new series, I think the old Doctor Who is stupid and boring. Granted, I only watched 2 or 3 episodes, but they were painful to watch. Bad acting, bad writing, bad stories, and terrible effects. Not that effects are everything, but you your ideas need to match your budget and execution. If I'm laughing at the dumb handpuppet, it just rips me out of the show.

I almost never read fiction that isn't sci-fi or fantasy. I'll watch movies or shows in all sorts of genres, but in a novel, unless there is some element of the fantastic, it won't hold my interest. e.g. The Dresden Files are awesome, but if he was just a regular PI, I probably wouldn't read it.

Oh yeah. Jane, Kaylee, and the ever awesome Mrs Lawrence Fishburne made the show for me.

Daft Punk I find merely meh. Apart from a couple of their songs that stand out, the rest all blur together as one giant sameness, kinda like Nickleback.

trueheart78 wrote:

1. I fail to understand the clamor for Nathan Fillion to be in everything.
He wasn't even the best part of FireFly (that would be Adam Baldwin, character-wise — not going to argue about the ladies).

Also, if you watch the recent season of Castle, you can see Nathan starting to get that 40 year old man chub going around the midsection and jowls. It's been roughly ten years. The man is just not in the same shape he used to be in. Nathan Fillion ten years ago as Hawkeye? I can buy it. Nathan Fillion today? Not so much.

Gravey wrote:

to of course the stories, the football episode being IMO the series' best illustration of what it's like being a geek among men.

Damn, I didn't even think about that. I was thinking of Spaced instead and some of their better use of geek humor, but The IT Crowd did the same story that I referenced from Big Bang earlier where Leonard was trying to learn about football, but did it better. And then made it larger than life because the best parts of IT Crowd is when sh*t hits the fan.

bighoppa wrote:

I was never bullied by older/bigger kids. It's a part of the assumed geek shared consciousness I can only stand back shake my head at.

I was bullied all the way to 7th grade. Then I moved to a new town and only had to deal with a couple of assholes, but because of personal experience and my brother, six years older than me, programming an "us vs. them" mentality into my brain, I had difficulty comprehending that people were people, all people were different, and just because one town is a certain way doesn't mean the other is the same.

As a result, some of my high school regrets aren't stuff like "Man, I should have asked that girl out" or something, but "Wow, I shouldn't have been such an asshole to people assuming they were all bullies." Oddly enough, people were still friendly to me nonetheless, and I cannot understand why.

ringsnort wrote:

Mrs Lawrence Fishburne made the show for me.

Wait, seriously? I didn't know she was married to him.

And no love for Wash? ....

I don't upgrade my gadgets when a new one is out.

PaladinTom wrote:

2. I just don't get Doctor Who

I like the intro theme and that's it.

trueheart78 wrote:

1. I fail to understand the clamor for Nathan Fillion to be in everything.

Oh man he should be in this thread amiright!

Because Whedon took my beloved Wash away, I have instead chosen to pick out Alan Tudyk's good roles when I can. For example, he's evidently King Candy in Wreck-It-Ralph.

And what a great job he did.

ccesarano wrote:
Gravey wrote:

to of course the stories, the football episode being IMO the series' best illustration of what it's like being a geek among men.

Damn, I didn't even think about that. I was thinking of Spaced instead and some of their better use of geek humor, but The IT Crowd did the same story that I referenced from Big Bang earlier where Leonard was trying to learn about football, but did it better. And then made it larger than life because the best parts of IT Crowd is when sh*t hits the fan. :D

I totally forgot about Spaced! /self-flagellates

The only difference with The IT Crowd is that geekiness and recognizing it in a true but exaggerated way is the point of that show. In Spaced, geekiness is just part of the texture of the more-or-less believable life of a (actually cool) twenty-something (yelling at the kid over Jar Jar notwithstanding) (or is it? I'll admit to nothing). So The IT Crowd is a great way to laugh at our more extreme sides, and Spaced is good for recognizing that hey we can like the things we like and be who we are, because that's what we grew up with, and that doesn't have to make us social pariahs. Even Roy could be Tim, if he'd just relax and be a little less self-centred.

But yes, they both use geek culture as a thing that we all know and has merit in itself—not as an alien entity to laugh at, which is what BBT seems to use it as.

I have never owned a Mac computer. I have used Macs, school and work, and have yet to see what any objective superiority Macs have for comparably priced PCs.

Gravey wrote:
ccesarano wrote:
Gravey wrote:

to of course the stories, the football episode being IMO the series' best illustration of what it's like being a geek among men.

Damn, I didn't even think about that. I was thinking of Spaced instead and some of their better use of geek humor, but The IT Crowd did the same story that I referenced from Big Bang earlier where Leonard was trying to learn about football, but did it better. And then made it larger than life because the best parts of IT Crowd is when sh*t hits the fan. :D

I totally forgot about Spaced! /self-flagellates

The only difference with The IT Crowd is that geekiness and recognizing it in a true but exaggerated way is the point of that show. In Spaced, geekiness is just part of the texture of the more-or-less believable life of a (actually cool) twenty-something (yelling at the kid over Jar Jar notwithstanding) (or is it? I'll admit to nothing). So The IT Crowd is a great way to laugh at our more extreme sides, and Spaced is good for recognizing that hey we can like the things we like and be who we are, because that's what we grew up with, and that doesn't have to make us social pariahs. Even Roy could be Tim, if he'd just relax and be a little less self-centred.

But yes, they both use geek culture as a thing that we all know and has merit in itself—not as an alien entity to laugh at, which is what BBT seems to use it as.

Did you see that ludicrous display last night?

I would love to have that discussion but I think it's better suited for the Feminism in Pop Culture thread down in P&C.

Oh. Fair enough. I stay away from political discussion, so never check that forum.

Me: Oh man, I don't want to stall a potential IT Crowd/Spaced conversation, so I'll let someone else handle that.

Demyx wrote:

I would love to have that discussion but I think it's better suited for the Feminism in Pop Culture thread down in P&C.

Thanks, Demyx!

Edit: Bad topic for the thread. Must think on it.

Join me into the crew of people who finds the whole fanboy outrage confusing because the Star Wars prequels seemed to be on the exact same mediocre level (no better or worse) as the original films. A lot of cool visual effects surrounded by a boring narrative provided with stilted dialogue. Never understood the hubbub.

Also, I have little interest in most fantasy and sci-fi outside of video games, with the exception of more cerebral science-fiction like 2001 or Solaris. The LOTR films bored me to tears, as did every episode of Star Trek: TNG I caught. I'm sorry, but when you establish a universe where a completely new unexplained phenomenon alters events and usually saves the day every 20 minutes, I don't see how anyone can feel invested in any of the characters. I mean, the conclusion of the epic LOTR series is literally

Spoiler:

Ah, crap, we are overpowered by forces and we are bound to lose. No, wait, I just totally forgot there is a cave full of undead warriors who will do my bidding out of a sense of loyalty just around this corner. Don't know why that hasn't come up at all in this incredibly long story that is all about us trying to find people to fight for us. THE END.

shoptroll wrote:
ringsnort wrote:

Mrs Lawrence Fishburne made the show for me.

Wait, seriously? I didn't know she was married to him.

And no love for Wash? ....

Heh! Wash is great, too.

My then future wife and Alan Tudyk did this junior players guild Shakespeare thing in the park together ages ago. So when she and I first started watching "Firefly" together, I got to hear about "Wash" a lot. And by "a lot" I mean A LOT.

Skimmed so not sure if anyone else said this but,

I really enjoyed Matrix 2 and Matrix 3. Nothing could beat the "newness" The Matrix but that does not mean the sequels were not entertaining!

EDIT: Duplicate post.

They should rename this thread "Clocking Away"

I love the Ancient Aliens show and other theories on the subject of 'ancient astronauts'.

As a scientist and an Episcopalian I can't reveal this to friends and co-workers or they'd laugh me out of the place, but to me some of the ideas are pretty interesting. Of course, there are a wide range of theories, many of them beyond kooky. That's my secret geek confession.

Running Man wrote:

I love the Ancient Aliens show and other theories on the subject of 'ancient astronauts'.

As a scientist and an Episcopalian I can't reveal this to friends and co-workers or they'd laugh me out of the place, but to me some of the ideas are pretty interesting. Of course, there are a wide range of theories, many of them beyond kooky. That's my secret geek confession.

Sometimes I get caught up in watching this stuff as well. But other times they're really disappointing. There was one on Discovery I believe, or Nat-Geo, that was a supposed documentation of some major Naval radar test that sent a whole bunch of oceanic mammals to go and get all beached up, and in one location kids discovered evidence of a mermaid/merman/merperson, and there was all kinds of stuff and bones and other crap. It was entertaining, sans the computer graphic "Here is how they behaved as they evolved!", up until they showed the "cell phone footage" from about 2000 that was able to zoom in like a classic camera, lost no detail or quality while zooming, and then the merperson was clearly CG.

It's fun to let the mind run wild and say "Hey, some of this sh*t could be awesome", but it's just dumb to throw something so obviously fake that the mystery goes away. I know most of that stuff is fake. It's nice to be able to pretend it could be real.

Gravey wrote:

1. The zombie trend is not just exhausted, it's an incredibly problematic fantasy to begin with. And most of the time, especially in video games, it's used as solely a wish-fulfillment fantasy. Fetishizing an apocalyptic scenario where you're free to hack apart your neighbours, as envisioned by First Worlders who will never in a thousand lifetimes understand what those scenarios are really like—Rwanda always springs immediately to my mind—is at best saddening.

Agreed. I will be happy when a zombie game comes out that merges survival scenarios, post apocalyptic and takes the zombie horde seriously.

I had fun playing Hellgate London and got excited when I heard it would be coming back to North America.

I prefer to read The Hobbit over Lord of the Rings, although both are good.

I am sculpting a pokemon out of clay... omanyte to be exact.

I think manga is an excellent example of the comic book medium, and it saddens me that many Western comic artists either avoid it altogether, or take the wrong kind of lessons from it. It's not the Disney eyes nor the sometimes graphic violence that makes great manga great.