Far Cry 3

I don't think they're ever free. And money sinks are good, you'll be rolling in the stuff if you loot dead guys, especially if you have the more money perk.

C4 on a truck
Driven to base. Alert! Shots!
Fire Chrysanthemums!

FedoraMcQuaid wrote:

Yeah I really like spotting all the pirates, shutting down the alarm box (for when my plan inevitably goes wrong), and forming a plan to systematically take them all out.
I also really really like when I do all those things but then a tiger comes out of nowhere and kills half of them for me.

On at least one occasion, I've watched as a tiger cleared out the entire base for me. Every single guy. Judging by the Zero Punctuation review, this isn't an uncommon occurrence.

That happened to me, in one of my early base clearings... in fact, it's what taught me that you get 1500XP for taking one out without them ever knowing for sure that you're there.

I was prowling around and scouting the angles, and a tiger showed up, and ate everyone.

What an infuriating save system! Just spent 30 minutes hunting and upgrading my equipment. Got killed by a komodo dragon I didn't see while skinning another and lost all that progress. Had to turn off the game.

So should I pick this up or just play Dishonored(on the pile, untouched), and wait for a sale?

SallyNasty wrote:

So should I pick this up or just play Dishonored(on the pile, untouched), and wait for a sale?

Dishonored makes a better, cohesive game. FC3 makes a better playbox, so it depends on what you want over the next few weeks!

MisterStatic wrote:
SallyNasty wrote:

So should I pick this up or just play Dishonored(on the pile, untouched), and wait for a sale?

Dishonored makes a better, cohesive game. FC3 makes a better playbox, so it depends on what you want over the next few weeks!

All IMHO, but it really depends upon the type of way you play these types of games:

Do you want to shoot (Far Cry 3) or stab in the back (Dishonored)

Sneak (Dishonored) or Run 'n Gun (Dishonored)

Collectibles (Far Cry 3) or Story Missions (Dishonored)

Both are great, so you'll have fun either way!

SallyNasty wrote:

So should I pick this up or just play Dishonored(on the pile, untouched), and wait for a sale?

Yes

Stick with your pile. This will come down on sale and then you've got the benefit of playing what you already bought and saving money.

The turtles will wait. They're awfully slow. (slow cooked amirite?)

BlackSabre wrote:

The turtles will wait. They're awfully slow. (slow cooked amirite?) :D

Strangely enough, you're not far off:

So I finished the game last night, and I'm still thinking about the plot. Not because it was good, God no. Because it was...weird. It was like they thought about taking it to some really interesting places then gave up about half way through. I'm trying to figure out if they were working something deep and it got lost or if they just made the story so irony free that it came back around and looked introspective.

I'll spoiler the rest:

Spoiler:

Character Design
It's been said before in this thread, but the character design of your friends is pretty strange. For one thing, they're all douches. I mean without question. They start fights in bars, do sambucca shots and have ridiculously easy lives. None of them are necessarily bad people, but they're not the kind of characters you create to be sympathetic. They're the kind of characters that Freddy Kreuger picks off one by one at summer camp. Also, they're all white. Which doesn't mean anything in itself, but in this day and age it plays strange. If this was a straightforward story approved by corporate marketing, then you have at least one black guy, and either your girlfriend or your brother's girlfriend is latina/other ethnicity. It's a pretty simple formula.

Like the Atlantic article says, the island is a Third World polyglot.
The inhabitants are largely Pacific Islanders with a Kiwi accent, Maori knock-offs. Voss has a Spanish accent. Voss' sister has more of an African or Caribbean accent. The pirates sound more Middle Eastern than anything, and are an ethnic hodge podge. Near the end, your friend Dennis mentions that he used to be a Liberian general, or something close to it. That doesn't mean he had a fancy office and had to do a lot of paperwork. It means he was one of several dozen brutal warlords who in brief summation, kidnapped children to brainwash as child soldiers, ate the hearts of virgins before going into battle (usually a little girl, since little boys could be trained as soldiers), were high as f*ck when they went into battle, and practiced the usual mass rape, genocide and general pillaging characteristic of complete societal breakdown. Some of this is just accidental. Voss is a product of his voice actor. But then again, why parachute in a Liberian unless you're trying to say something?

You get a tribal tattoo.
Once again, from the Atlantic article. That has to be a joke, right? The most reviled tattoo in America, the tribal tattoo that doesn't actual mean anything, that's the source of your power. On a white guy. If they had included a few barbed wire loops for extra hit points, that would have given it away, surely.

The video from your capture
It's playing on a TV when you go down into Hoyt's basement to torture your little brother. Maybe it was supposed to be a hallucination. Maybe it's supposed to remind you of what the plot was after you've been scuba-diving for relics for six hours. When I first saw it, I thought it meant that one of your friends had betrayed you in the first place. Which doesn't make sense either, because if you did the drug flashbacks in Dr. Reinhardt's cave, you know it's the expat American DJ in Thailand who set you up.

Your friends are useless in proportion with how difficult it was to rescue them.

It's almost Nietzchian. As you have to go to greater lengths to rescue your friends, they become less and less useful. Reposting from a few pages back: Grant was some sort of special forces solider who could kill a man with his bare hands and throw knives like Arnold Schwarzenegger in Commando. He rescues you. Daisy escaped by herself and can fix a boat. Your girlfriend, whose name I'm forgetting, is good at moral support and making small wood crosses. Olly is mostly good at getting stoned with Dr. Reinhardt. Right at the end, Riley can apparently fly a helicopter thanks to his pilot's training (which is a little bit like being able to ride a wild horse because you have your motorcycle license), but I feel like that's past the point where the narrative comes off the rails.

Both endings are about video games
I chose not to slit my girlfriend's throat because I'm apparently incapable of doing bad things in video games. Maybe it fit the narrative better, I don't know. But when you cut her restraints, Citra starts telling you that you could stay on the island forever, being a king and a warrior. Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but it sounded a lot like the Conrad speech near the end of Spec Ops, where Conrad is telling you (the real life you, not the video game you) that you could have stopped any time, but you wanted to be a hero. I might write it off, but for the other ending, where Citra stabs you in the heart as you're f*cking her and tells you that you've won. I have no idea what either of these things means in context with the rest of the story, but they feel like they're trying to say something.

Danjo's complaint
There's some pretty strong foreshadowing about removing your character's powers and ending the game if you decide to save your girlfriend. They don't do it, but I read his spoiler after I finished the game, and I had the same thought during the ending sequence. So at least two of us were thinking it. I have to wonder if it was one of those high minded design decisions that gets cut when Beta testers start screaming about it.

There's just so much weird stuff there that feels like it means something, but none of it fits together. I feel like a numerologist, or a UFO hunter.

I look at it in a much simpler way: the main story is really stupid, written by corporate drones to try to push boxes. The programmers tried to sneak in a good game around their idiot overlords, and largely succeeded.

Thanks for those thoughts, kazooka. I agree with all of that.

Spoiler:

I am a little more sympathetic overall, but probably without reason. I think I'm just trying too hard to make things fit into a smarter package than they actually do. The Alice in Wonderland stuff is one thing, but then is undone by the assertion that this is all real and you're actually becoming a truer version of yourself here on the island. The game can't decide if you're on one long drugged out trip through the unconscious or waking up from your decadent American lifestyle to find your calling rescuing the oppressed and defeating evil. Because the island culture makes no sense and so many of the climactic battles are during psychedelic delusions, the whole thing just feels like a white guy's bad dream. On the other hand, maybe this is actually a masterfully subtle jab at modern gaming culture dominated by young white males with disposable income who fantasize about free drugs, guns and breasts.

On reaching the last island:

Spoiler:

I figured out you don't need much height at all to use the wingsuit. Also if you go into parachute, then drop, then wingsuit again, you can keep in the air for longer.

So I'm at the mission "Doppleganger" you know which one it is, it's the insta-fail stealth no-kill one.

RAGE!

Anyone have an easy way to finish it? Can't get past "the room".

The room with the heavy guys in it? Throw lots of rocks and move behind the curtains of moss around the outside of the room. Then throw more rocks and sneak behind the heavy. They all seem to have bad peripheral vision so take advantage of that.

Tach wrote:

So I'm at the mission "Doppleganger" you know which one it is, it's the insta-fail stealth no-kill one.

RAGE!

Anyone have an easy way to finish it? Can't get past "the room".

There's a passage to the left as you enter, then turns right and towards the end. Just crouch and walk through there. I didn't have a need to throw rocks at all during that part.

I can't believe I grabbed all 3 farcry games for less than a fiver this morning owing to a pricing c0ckup at gamespot/impulse. Consider this a gloating post.

I dunno about the rest of y'all, but I feel a little bit sorry for whoever did the music for this. There are so many situations where it's helpful to be able to locate something you haven't spotted/tagged (wildlife, pirates talking) using sound, that I had to turn it off.

Just finished up with Buck.

Spoiler:

You have to admit. They really made him an unlikable character. Like you really just wanted to kill him the whole way through. Their villains are really well made so far.

To be honest, I didn't find the missions that bad. I was expecting worse considering some of the comments here. But they were actually ok.

kazooka wrote:

So I finished the game last night, and I'm still thinking about the plot. Not because it was good, God no. Because it was...weird. It was like they thought about taking it to some really interesting places then gave up about half way through. I'm trying to figure out if they were working something deep and it got lost or if they just made the story so irony free that it came back around and looked introspective.

This Penny Arcade piece explains the story. And sadly, now that I know what the writer was getting at I have no interest in playing Far Cry 3.

Playing Far Cry 3 for the story is kinda like going to McDonalds for a Carrot.

Yeah I know. I've cooled down a tad and may end up playing this at some point for the reasons I was interested in the first place--to explore the environment, etc, but at the moment I'm still in protest mode.

complexmath wrote:
kazooka wrote:

So I finished the game last night, and I'm still thinking about the plot. Not because it was good, God no. Because it was...weird. It was like they thought about taking it to some really interesting places then gave up about half way through. I'm trying to figure out if they were working something deep and it got lost or if they just made the story so irony free that it came back around and looked introspective.

This Penny Arcade piece explains the story. And sadly, now that I know what the writer was getting at I have no interest in playing Far Cry 3.

Oh man, that's some silly stuff. But it shouldn't really affect you one way or the other. None of the stuff in the article came through in the game other than through the cracks around the plot.

I don't want to go point by point through that article, but a couple of things stood out:

“My goal was to create something that people could analyze. Analysis is fun because there are many interpretations. If there’s just one interpretation then it’s not worth analyzing.”

Um, yeah, but that's from the point of view of the audience. If you're the creator, you'd better have a damn clear vision for what it is you're trying to say. It's perfectly reasonable to ask a literary question, but that's not what's happening here. There is one question and one answer. Is colonialism bad? Yes, colonialism is bad. There are some interesting threads laid down, but the reason this game is catching flack is that they're never pulled together.

Yohalem likened game development to an actor on stage. An audience understands that when an actor is on stage, every movement, every word, every gesture means something. Gamers, however, haven’t come to that point yet for video games.

Clearly I did not pay close enough attention to those letters about the grenade-throwing monkey.

Honestly I feel like people are going to read that and get defensive about not getting it.
I also feel like if people didn't even get an idea about how the theme was meant to be portrayed they clearly didn't pay enough attention. Which is understandable seeing as so many people went into the game expecting the story to be trash, so when you expect something like that unless it's thrown in your face otherwise you'll believe it.

Seriously as subtle as most of the other stuff is the Alice in Wonderland quote had to AT LEAST have people thinking...

On the other hand if you don't care to think about and consider things like game stories then you still have some pretty good gameplay. So it succeeds either way, I'd say.

An audience understands that when an actor is on stage, every movement, every word, every gesture means something. Gamers, however, haven’t come to that point yet for video games.

Yes, this. Doubly true with a competent director and film: every second, every shot, every angle means something, and is a product of the creative process. That video games are approaching this level of sheer directoral control is an amazing moment, and one that I hope catapults games into the analytical realm, fusing the enjoyment of the experience with the intellectual exploration that cinema and literature embody.

However, I don't buy that Far Cry 3 is that game.

FedoraMcQuaid wrote:

Honestly I feel like people are going to read that and get defensive about not getting it.
I also feel like if people didn't even get an idea about how the theme was meant to be portrayed they clearly didn't pay enough attention. Which is understandable seeing as so many people went into the game expecting the story to be trash, so when you expect something like that unless it's thrown in your face otherwise you'll believe it.

Fedora and I were talking about this in IRC, and I think that the open world stuff of Far Cry 3 really hurts this kind of portrayal.

The problem isn't that they tried to add subtle storytelling, the problem is that the player isn't ever really focused on the story. They're always focused on what they want to do next. Good open world games are like theme parks without lines. You see where you want to go next, and you go and do that. There's rarely any real tension, because you know that if you screw up, you'll be dropped at the nearest hospital/town/whatever with some lost money, and that's about it. You rarely feel much tension in the story, as well, because you know you'll be dumped back into the world to start the mission/fort/hunting/whatever loop all over again. You don't have much time after the cutscene to digest what you just went through. That's the reason that people are half listening to Far Cry 3. It's because they're half paying attention to the story, and half paying attention to the rest of the game.

And I also think that works as an alternate analysis of the game. I just think that blog post should serve more of a "oh I didnt see that before that's interesting" and less of a "well it's your fault for making it too subtle!".

So, upshot: if you analyze the game the way the writer wants you to, it's even dumber. The stupidity is nearly unbounded.