Wii U Catch-All

Ulairi wrote:

Does anyone else really like the Nintendo executive team?

I continue to be impressed by their frankness. It's nice to know that they're aware of what the problems are and that they're working to correct them.

Ulairi wrote:

Does anyone else really like the Nintendo executive team? When they had the loss in FY 2012 management took pay cuts and forgo bonuses and they are taking the blame and not bullsh*tting about why the Wii U isn't selling. It's really hard not to root for these guys.

They are the best. Watching Nintendo Direct makes me like those guys, too. All "We made this exciting game! Please look forward to it!"

Demyx wrote:

They are the best. Watching Nintendo Direct makes me like those guys, too. All "We made this exciting game! Please look forward to it!"

You know what I like most about the Nintendo Directs? That they tend to show a lot of gameplay footage and talk about how the game will play and not how it'll look or the revolutionary new graphics technology that's gone into it or whatever. Even the trailer for Smash Bros., which was heavy on the CG animation by Nintendo standards, still showed the game in action.

ClockworkHouse wrote:
Demyx wrote:

They are the best. Watching Nintendo Direct makes me like those guys, too. All "We made this exciting game! Please look forward to it!"

You know what I like most about the Nintendo Directs? That they tend to show a lot of gameplay footage and talk about how the game will play and not how it'll look or the revolutionary new graphics technology that's gone into it or whatever. Even the trailer for Smash Bros., which was heavy on the CG animation by Nintendo standards, still showed the game in action.

I bet a lot of the reason they can do that is because they usually don't show games until they're pretty far along in production.

Yup. I may not always like every choice they make, but I like the attitude of the company's leadership and their genuine interest in making and playing fun games.

Some interesting thoughts from Iwata in the post-E3 Analyst Q&A

I would say that “Nintendo Land” has not fulfilled the same role as “Wii Sports” did when we bundled it with Wii.

Of course, we won’t remain silent and do nothing. We are going to release a variety of Wii U software, and with each title, we would like to show how convenient and delightful it is to have the Wii U GamePad controller, and how it changes the gaming experience.

In addition, we have also learned that the name “asymmetric gameplay” does not fully explain the GamePad’s value to consumers. As for the software going to be released from now on, we would like to describe the experience that the GamePad provides with a different expression in order to adequately convey its necessity to consumers and increase the number of consumers that think, “Indeed it is good to have a GamePad.” In this sense, starting with “Pikmin 3,” we aim to include functions that make good use of the GamePad that consumers can appreciate.

However, we are not planning to offer, for example, Mario or Pokémon games in a free-to-play format. With games like Mario and Pokémon, we already have a sufficient degree of trust with our consumers who are willing to pay a certain sum of money to purchase our products as packaged software. On the other hand, what are we to do when we want to offer a completely new product whose value consumers are yet to understand? Consumers are not sure if it is worth outlaying a certain sum of money for such a product.
On the other hand, free-to-play games, if unbalanced, could result in some consumers paying extremely large amounts of money, and we can certainly not expect to build a good relationship with our consumers in this fashion. In order to have a favorable long-term relationship, we would like to offer free-to-play games that are balanced and reasonable.
First, I think it is becoming increasingly more difficult to have consumers understand and appreciate the value that a particular game offers than ever before. For example, it is now common to find on smart devices a large volume of products categorized as games selling for one dollar. With countless games offered for free, consumers are far more careful than ever to decide whether it is worthwhile to spend dozens of dollars to buy one game. Under these circumstances, we feel that it is important to offer games that are even more polished than before in terms of quality to have consumers buy our products, understand the value that they offer and recommend them to others by word-of-mouth. It now requires incredibly high-quality products to satisfy consumers to the level where they feel compelled to recommend them to others; the barriers are indeed higher than before. Moreover, it is not an easy task to regain the trust of the fans of a franchise once you lose it. Therefore, it is critical for us to improve and re-polish any game that we feel is still lacking in quality. Failing to do so, we feel, would be detrimental to what makes our strong franchises the valuable assets that they are.
Ulairi wrote:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/100810130

"We are to blame," he said. "We relaxed our [marketing] efforts, so the consumers today still cannot understand what's so good and unique about the Wii U. Because we're always trying to be unique, it takes some energies on our side to [make] people understand the real attractions about whatever we are doing."

Does anyone else really like the Nintendo executive team? When they had the loss in FY 2012 management took pay cuts and forgo bonuses and they are taking the blame and not bullsh*tting about why the Wii U isn't selling. It's really hard not to root for these guys.

I think the Corporate World could learn a thing or two. Regardless for the reasons for their current state, the Nintendo executives are saying "we're in charge, therefore it's our fault." Most CEOs are all about deflecting blame to everyone but themselves, while still collecting their large paycheques for supposedly steering the ship. Nintendo is one of the most historically successful companies in history but they have a couple of bad years (out of more than 100 in business, all turning a profit up to that point) and say "we screwed up, we'll take a pay cut and make it right." This is how business leaders should operate.

I really hope that they are able to come up with a profitable yet reasonable model for FTP games. Some needs to set an example to the mobile space, and Nintendo may just be the company to do it. Very few games manage to find that line between "money grabbing" and "game breaking" when to comes to FTP; with their focus on gameplay over all, finding that line would seem to be the only way Nintendo can succeed as both a business and a gamer-friendly company.

Sigh. Looks like we might never get to see another F-Zero game. It doesn't help racing games that Nintendo is analog trigger free across all current platforms.

Miyamoto[/url]]"I certainly understand that people want a new F-Zero game," Miyamoto said. "I think where I struggle is that I don’t really have a good idea for what’s new that we could bring to F-Zero that would really turn it into a great game again. Certainly I can see how people looking at Mario Kart 8 could see, through the anti-gravity, a connection to F-Zero. But I don’t know, at this point, what direction we could go in with a new F-Zero."

They could certainly go in the direction of making F-Zero more accessible.

I wonder what Nintendo would do if a company like Codemasters made a prototype and said "What do you think?". I know they're good at regular racing games, but I have to wonder if they could bring something new to the series with an outside perspective.

I'd say Criterion as well, but they seem to be in Need for Speed Hell.

ccesarano wrote:

I'd say Criterion as well, but they seem to be in Need for Speed Hell.

Criterion stated they are looking to move away from racing games for now.

I can't find the article I linked right now (it got lost in the Nintendo-on-phones discussion), but I read a really great interview with Miyamoto that touches on this. Essentially, he said that when they sit down to make a new game, they look at what they can do in terms of gameplay mechanics that other people aren't doing and that they haven't already done. They don't want to make a new iteration on a franchise just because it's expected on a new platform or because the production values could be higher on a new platform.

Now, I know some people are going to argue whether or not they actually do that, but I think it's a philosophy they at least try to live by, and it might explain why F-Zero is in indefinite limbo. If the only thing they can think of to do with an F-Zero game is "new F-Zero! in HD!", then they're not going to make one. I wouldn't be surprised to see them re-release an older F-Zero game in some fashion, but if they're out of fresh ideas, I'm not surprised that it's lying fallow for now.

It also explains why the Mario 3D Land is back to having four player co-op. It's a real stretch that each game does something different, but I guess if they're even struggling with F-Zero.

Though in all honesty, have they done F-Zero with online play yet? Or would that not really count?

ccesarano wrote:

Though in all honesty, have they done F-Zero with online play yet? Or would that not really count?

Not yet. Last F-Zero games were during the GBA/GC era. I think the main difficulty would be supporting up 30 racers. Mario Kart Wii capped out at 12 I think.

shoptroll wrote:
ccesarano wrote:

Though in all honesty, have they done F-Zero with online play yet? Or would that not really count?

Not yet. Last F-Zero games were during the GBA/GC era. I think the main difficulty would be supporting up 30 racers. Mario Kart Wii capped out at 12 I think.

There was an arcade game co-produced with Sega in the mid-2000's.

cube wrote:
shoptroll wrote:
ccesarano wrote:

Though in all honesty, have they done F-Zero with online play yet? Or would that not really count?

Not yet. Last F-Zero games were during the GBA/GC era. I think the main difficulty would be supporting up 30 racers. Mario Kart Wii capped out at 12 I think.

There was an arcade game co-produced with Sega in the mid-2000's.

That was release in conjunction with the Gamecube game if I'm remembering correctly.

shoptroll wrote:
cube wrote:
shoptroll wrote:
ccesarano wrote:

Though in all honesty, have they done F-Zero with online play yet? Or would that not really count?

Not yet. Last F-Zero games were during the GBA/GC era. I think the main difficulty would be supporting up 30 racers. Mario Kart Wii capped out at 12 I think.

There was an arcade game co-produced with Sega in the mid-2000's.

That was release in conjunction with the Gamecube game if I'm remembering correctly.

And the Gamecube version had the Arcade version specific tracks on disk that were unlockable via a couple legitimate means.

Anyone else download Super Luigi U?

My wife is quite taken with playing the Nabbit, who nets 1UPs for each item they collect during the level (without dying), and is impervious to damage from regular enemies.

We're downloading it on Sunday or Monday, too busy this weekend to really bother diving into it. Looking forward to seeing the new levels.

McIrishJihad wrote:

Anyone else download Super Luigi U?

My wife is quite taken with playing the Nabbit, who nets 1UPs for each item they collect during the level (without dying), and is impervious to damage from regular enemies.

Does it require the original game if you download it?

PRG013 wrote:
McIrishJihad wrote:

Anyone else download Super Luigi U?

My wife is quite taken with playing the Nabbit, who nets 1UPs for each item they collect during the level (without dying), and is impervious to damage from regular enemies.

Does it require the original game if you download it?

yes.

I downloaded it this morning. I haven't had time to play it but I'm really interested in jumping in.

It's basically a $20 DLC pack for Super Mario Bros WiiU. But what you get is they drop Mario, Luigi is default P1, add the Nabbit, and then replace all the levels with challenge levels that have a 100 second counter instead of 300 (or 500?) seconds.

With us still in the middle of box-land from our move, the WiiU has been the most accessible console we have hooked up, so we've been tearing through to round out coin collection and opening every world on the map.

McIrishJihad wrote:

It's basically a $20 DLC pack for Super Mario Bros WiiU. But what you get is they drop Mario, Luigi is default P1, add the Nabbit, and then replace all the levels with challenge levels that have a 100 second counter instead of 300 (or 500?) seconds.

When you put it that way, its sounds like a worse rip off than most crappy dlc out there already. Is there actually any new content?

Replacing all the levels with new challenge levels sounds like a ripoff?

Yeah, not sure how 84 new levels is a ripoff.

Anyway, I shortsightedly sold my copy of NSMBU so I have to wait for the $30 standalone version in August.

Blind_Evil wrote:

Yeah, not sure how 84 new levels is a ripoff.

It's certainly a better deal than the NSMB2 DLC packs. I think those are closer to $3-5 for a pack of 3-6 levels?

Or if you want to go retro, it's a better deal than Super Mario Bros. 2 (Japanese version) which is pretty analogous to this DLC.

Blind_Evil wrote:

Yeah, not sure how 84 new levels is a ripoff.

Anyway, I shortsightedly sold my copy of NSMBU so I have to wait for the $30 standalone version in August.

One could argue they're remixed levels, nit 'new' ones.

So wait...they are ENTIRELY new levels, or are they same levels with shorter timers?

The world map itself is unchanged from New Super Mario Bros. U and level designs have had a drastic makeover, making them much harder. As mentioned above, playable characters and their abilities have changed. The timer for each level is also set to start from 100 seconds and the 100-seconds time bonus are added to the timer after going to the boss door in the towers and castles.

To me, "level designs have had a drastic makeover, making them much harder" sounds like new levels. I finished the main game and the levels I've seen demoed do not look familiar outside of the general visual aesthetic.