Space and Astronomy in general

Yeah, it sounds like it came in too hot... so fast it bounced. Probably that bounce was the legs being crushed, and then it landed again on the skirt, shoving the engines into the fuselage and breaking the hell out of the plumbing.

What about the fire before the landing itself? That wasn't a leak?

The Scott Manley analysis of multiple feeds showed that three of the six legs failed to deploy correctly. Mind you, that's less consequential for the overall success of the project - these aren't the final landing legs. But still. 50% failure rate is... Bad.

First "Exploring Space" lecture is this Tuesday night.

https://airandspace.si.edu/events/ma...

farley your link is just the text, not a link. Maybe this?

EDIT: That was only half. The full thing at Business Insider

ooops! I can't find the original link I used - I actually think it was from IMGUR which was the photo and then a link to the story but I can't dig it up.

I would say your link says everything and your second link was great too.

It is amazing stuff

Ghost of a Supernova is the name of my Soundgarden tribute band.

Any recommendations for starting out in astronomy and learning telescopes? I jumped in the deep end of the pool by buying a couple of used Meade scopes. I had them professionally cleaned and colummated(?). I have to start reading the manuals on how to use them and the software. But should I start with something simpler? Maybe just the spotting scope and a star chart? I bought the Nightwatch book that was highly recommended. Are there any YouTube videos I should watch?

Collimated, I think that's the word you want.

verb
verb: collimate; 3rd person present: collimates; past tense: collimated; past participle: collimated; gerund or present participle: collimating

make (rays of light or particles) accurately parallel.
"the cesium atoms are collimated into a narrow beam"
accurately align (an optical or other system).
"manuals give detailed instructions for collimating the optics"

In cosmological news: First results from Fermilab’s Muon g-2 experiment strengthen evidence of new physics

It's not official, but it suggests an unknown fundamental force or particles. OTOH, this article, which was also just published in Nature yesterday, claims that the Standard Model can adequately describe the deviation.

Physicist fight!

Edit: Whoops, meant to say it's NOT official. Fixed.

Explanation comic:
IMAGE(https://physics.aps.org/assets/d70625f9-7fa5-4124-9ef9-21fd46c0a605/e47_1_medium.png)

I used to read Jorge Cham's comics all the time.

dewalist wrote:

Any recommendations for starting out in astronomy and learning telescopes? I jumped in the deep end of the pool by buying a couple of used Meade scopes. I had them professionally cleaned and colummated(?). I have to start reading the manuals on how to use them and the software. But should I start with something simpler? Maybe just the spotting scope and a star chart? I bought the Nightwatch book that was highly recommended. Are there any YouTube videos I should watch?

I'd start simpler, but this is only based on my experience with getting into astronomy with whatever I had available as a kid.

I'd start by looking at star charts appropriate for your location and time. There are several decent apps as well. Google Sky Map is free, and I currently use the paid version of Stellarium. Familiarize yourself with some key points like Polaris (North Star), Orion's Belt, the Big Dipper. You'll use those to locate other objects and learn your way around.

Your lowest magnification will give you your widest field of view. Starting there will make things easier to find. If you have decent binoculars, you might even start there before moving on to the scope. Jupiter and its moons and Saturn are probably good starting points if you just want to see something.

Knowing your way around the star charts will help you figure out what some fuzzy blob is that you've spotted with the naked eye. It's probably something in the Messier Catalog. Then you can zoom in for a look with the scope.

Obviously, the darker the location, the better. A full moon is easy to spot and look at, but it's worse for looking at everything else. Put a red filter on your flashlight.

Stuff like this is why I keep a pair of red/blue glasses near my desk: yesterday's NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day featuring Ingenuity.

IMAGE(https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/2104/PIA24547_fig1.jpg)

On a related note, I just got a notification from NASA that they will have live coverage of Ingenuity from Mission Control at 0330 EDT on Monday April 12.

The first flight attempt for Ingenuity has been pushed back to no earlier than April 14th.

For my fellow SW developers here, the article states that they had anomaly during their test due to a Watchdog Timer expiring when transitioning to flight mode.

Ten bucks says the source at the location of the Ingenuity error reads:

// TODO

Imagine if NASA had an actual budget instead of the pittance it gets.

Mixolyde wrote:

Imagine if NASA had an actual budget instead of the pittance it gets.

"NASA Will Spend $2,941,394,557 On SpaceX's Massive Lunar Starship Lander!!!"

merphle wrote:
Mixolyde wrote:

Imagine if NASA had an actual budget instead of the pittance it gets.

"NASA Will Spend $2,941,394,557 On SpaceX's Massive Lunar Starship Lander!!!"

... SpaceX was chosen because they were the only ones that could do it that cheaply. With a proper budget they could fund a backup system that would have its own uses, for example.

The only reason SpaceX can do it that cheaply is because they expect to have other customers using the same system.

I think we're going to get a more zoomed in version via a more powerful lens in the next few days, if I read a recent article correctly.

Crew-2 launch was early this morning. I feel guilty for not getting up early to watch but 0549 EDT is just too early for me. Terminal count starts at about 04:28:00 of the video.

Rendezvous with ISS is at an equally unpleasant hour for me, about 0510 EDT (0910 UTC) tomorrow.

Coast phase coverage continues here:

Arrival and docking at ISS this morning.

Montalban posted this in the video thread, but I figured some people here might not follow that thread.

Montalban wrote:

Ingenuity's third flight. Wait for it....

"Permission for a fly-by?"

"Negative, Ingenuity, the pattern is full.."

ZOOOOOM

Mission 4

Watching SpaceX land live at nearly 3am. So f*cking cool.

Edit: splashdown!

Stele wrote:

Watching SpaceX land live at nearly 3am. So f*cking cool.

Edit: splashdown!

I just found it randomly. Watching over breakfast. Feels momentous.

Infrared video of the splashdown (from a distance). In my opinion not as elegant as a booster landing or shuttle landing, but still amazing nonetheless!

Would love to hear more about the transferrability of the 68 million SpaceX frequent flyer miles though.

SN-15 has successfully launched and landed.