Gaming Confessions & Blasphemy

I'm about 6 or so hours into FFVI so far and am having trouble getting into it.

Eleima wrote:
tboon wrote:
Eleima wrote:

I have spent over a thousand hours on Elder Scrolls games.
And I regret nothing. (Even though I probably should)

Why? They are great. I have at least that many as well across the series, starting with Arena.

Probably because I should have been doing something more productive with my time (or maybe I'm just channeling my mother ). I'm seriously afraid to try and count exactly how many hours I've spent on TES, I'm probably closer to 1,500, but I like it here in Denialland.

I don't want this to come across the wrong way, so please take it in the spirit it is given, which is one of comradeship. But this sort of thinking has kept videogames in a ghetto for far too long.

If gaming is your hobby, be proud of it. Stand tall. It is at least as "productive" as golf, working on cars, or any of a thousand other hobbies people partake in (and usually a helluva lot cheaper too ). Not picking on you, mind you, just the mindset that gaming as a hobby is somehow "wasted time". It's not. If you are into it and enjoy it, there is nothing at all wrong with spending your free time engaged in it. Like anything else, people need balance; spending too much time on any one thing is not healthy. But, other than that, it's just a hobby that needs no more nor less justification than any other hobby.

Revel in you videogamieness.

Bulletstorm was the best comedy game of 2011

nel e nel wrote:

Bulletstorm was the best comedy game of 2011

Plus it was ridiculously fun. Such a shame to see the sequel get shot down.

My confessions:

I have never played a Zelda game

I have never got into a Mario game

and the big one!

I some times like to cheat.

Never in multiplayer but I sometimes like to cheat my way through single player games either after I have finished the game or when I have gotten bored of the game. To my shame I sometimes cheat when the game gets too hard.

Cheating may ruin a game but who doesn't like feeling like a god once and a while.

B Dog wrote:

I enjoy playing a wide range of game genres, including strategy, RPG, simulation, action, and adventure, but a disproportionately large percentage of most memorable gaming moments come from sports games.

I can still remember dancing silently around my living room, pumping my fist in the air and trying not to wake my wife and newborn son at 2:30 in the morning after my Blackburn side won the FA Cup in Championship Manager. There are countless other examples, including winning the World Series in an OOTP online league, scoring a Game 7 overtime winner in the NHL series, and so on. Maybe it has to do with the inherent drama in sports games or that we bring a lot of backstory to the games ourselves since we know the teams and players or that unlike most other games (where I know I will eventually beat that final boss and win the game), there are plenty of moments in good sports games where achieving the final objective is very much in doubt.

One of my favorite video game moments is still from NFL2K1, when I made Lamar Smith leap over a tackling defensive back and into the end zone. It doesn't sound all that impressive, but it wasn't something I was even aware that you could do in that game. (And even after X00 hours of playing the game, I never did it again). Sports games work very well because they're based on games that have been developed over at least a century to get the optimal amount of excitement from repetitive actions.

I love E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial on Atari. It was one of my first favorite games, as it had far more depth than most everything else on Atari (e.g. Combat, Pacman, etc.). I went back to it a couple of years ago and still enjoyed it. It's a great puzzle. You've got to collect all the phone pieces and make it to the landing site in time all the while avoiding the police and not running out of energy. It was probably the game I played most until Super Mario Brothers 1 came out. To his day I don't see why everyone hates it.

Incidentally, gamers who refer to Final Fantasy IV and VI as II and III should be put to sleep. Seriously, you should know better; you have the internet.

I got emotional at the end of Deadly Premonition and believe it to be one of the best games of this generation despite all logic (poor maps, rubbish grapics, horrible combat) saying it should be one of the worst

The closest I have ever got to playing a JRPG is the demo of FF7.

On one game of Football Manager, I put in 10 days of game time into it. Which links to my most rememberable gaming moment, when as Ajax in the Champions League final I was 1-0 down with only 3 mins to go, I threw on an 18 year old stiker, who scored 2 goals in 2 mins and we won the game 2-1. It was his only appearence for the club, he was only on the bench because all my other stikers were injuried.

Eleima wrote:

I used to be a pirate.

I think we've all been there, especially in our younger days. I'm more than making up for it now, instead of playing games I didn't buy, I'm buying games I'll never play.

strangederby wrote:

Despite my feminist principles I've found myself enjoying Saints Row.

I think Saints Row is secretly one of the more feminist games out there. That video is pretty tongue in cheek, but it also makes some valid points.

Pikey26 wrote:

I really enjoyed the shooting in Mirror's Edge.

Amen brother! Never understood the hate there.

I'm pretty sure I've seen arguments for Deadly Premonition being a JRPG.

Blind_Evil wrote:

I'm pretty sure I've seen arguments for Deadly Premonition being a JRPG.

I mean the traditional random battles, party based JRPGs. I was just taking a short cut. Also it isn't a JRPG, those arguments are wrong

The first console I ever owned was an Xbox 360. I bought it because I really wanted to play Dead Rising. I hated Dead Rising.

I never had a SNES...

I loved everything about Dead Rising and feel like the game wouldn't have been nearly as interesting without the time limit.

As for FF6 being boring, I can understand that. I can't place why but there's something about the combat in 4 and 7 that is just more fun. Its status as best is usually attributed to characters and story, which I imagine will be harder to get into these days.

First Person Shooters are old news and I want them retired.
1983. Atari 2600. Battlezone.

I don't doubt that someone could dig up even older first person perspective games where the object is to shoot things.

There's a reason we're not still playing Pac-Man clones. Why does everything have to be a first person shooter in 2012?

MrAndrewJ wrote:

Why does everything have to be a first person shooter in 2012?

Because the hot buzzword this generation was immersion? And devs think that a 1st person perspective is an easy way to do that?

Personally, I think they are a little tired. It won't stop me from playing Halo 4 though.

MrAndrewJ wrote:

Why does everything have to be a first person shooter in 2012?

Excerpts from this excellent Stephen Totillo piece (if you really want the answer, read the whole article):

Shooting in video games is ultimately the connecting of Point A to Point B, the elimination of one set of shapes, representing the enemy, from a TV screen to keep another arrangement of shapes, representing you, illuminated and ready for the next encounter. A good shooter game is a laboratory for tactical decisions and a test chamber for your reflexes and wits. It's armed checkers or chess with no resting for turn taking.
Shooters, I was saying, are some of the best games for letting us make decisions.

And it's so true. Each CoD match is a measure of my reflexes, decision making, and poise. All at a breakneck pace that's just thrilling. It's a roller coaster with rider input. It shouldn't be a surprise that this experience is popular, and whatever's popular gets aped. Eventually the market will likely saturate, bloated husks falling below the water level, cream rising once again to the top. There are too many shooters, but they're better and deeper games than detractors realize.

Minor gaming blasphemy:

5) The Pile is a horrible concept and being constrained by it is more horrible.

OK, you paid your money and you want to play your game. Great. I totally get that. But to feel bound to finish games and not get and/or play something else because of some duty to some list seems crazy to me. Play what you want when you want to for as long as it's fun, whether that's four hours, forty hours or four hundred. And then move on. If a game is fun, play it. If it stops being fun, stop. Easy. Be free. Freedom is cool.

And it's so true. Each CoD match is a measure of my reflexes, decision making, and poise. All at a breakneck pace that's just thrilling. It's a roller coaster with rider input. It shouldn't be a surprise that this experience is popular, and whatever's popular gets aped. Eventually the market will likely saturate, bloated husks falling below the water level, cream rising once again to the top. There are too many shooters, but they're better and deeper games than detractors realize.

I think any genre of inherently competitive game can be like. Shooters, racers, strategy games, fighters--they all have the qualities you describe. I think the only thing that sets them apart is that it is far easier to market those qualities to a larger audience. The marketing (and setting) are the window-dressing that get people in the door; the mechanics are what keep people around (presumably).

tboon wrote:

Minor gaming blasphemy:

5) The Pile is a horrible concept and being constrained by it is more horrible.

OK, you paid your money and you want to play your game. Great. I totally get that. But to feel bound to finish games and not get and/or play something else because of some duty to some list seems crazy to me. Play what you want when you want to for as long as it's fun, whether that's four hours, forty hours or four hundred. And then move on. If a game is fun, play it. If it stops being fun, stop. Easy. Be free. Freedom is cool.

Totes agree.

tboon wrote:

I don't want this to come across the wrong way, so please take it in the spirit it is given, which is one of comradeship. But this sort of thinking has kept videogames in a ghetto for far too long.
If gaming is your hobby, be proud of it. Stand tall. It is at least as "productive" as golf, working on cars, or any of a thousand other hobbies people partake in (and usually a helluva lot cheaper too ). Not picking on you, mind you, just the mindset that gaming as a hobby is somehow "wasted time". It's not. If you are into it and enjoy it, there is nothing at all wrong with spending your free time engaged in it. Like anything else, people need balance; spending too much time on any one thing is not healthy. But, other than that, it's just a hobby that needs no more nor less justification than any other hobby.
Revel in you videogamieness. :)

Oh, I could not agree more, trust me! But old habits die hard, and it's difficult to get rid of something that's been ingrained within you for over 25 years. My remark stems from that, and probably from living in a decidedly non gamer environment (the only gamer I know in my immediate circle is a friend's teenage son). I accept that video gaming is part of who I am, and nothing's going to change that now!

I've got another confession:
I played Baldur's Gate 2 before I played Baldur's Gate 1......

I intentionally don't finish games I really like because I like the idea of being in "still playing" limbo. Sometimes I'll watch the ending on youtube, as with BioShock or Skyrim, but it's because I loved those experiences so much I didn't want to reach the official "end". A few years back I got the Fallout 3 Complete collection, and while I loved the main story, once I completed the main quest I didn't have any urge to play the dlc, because at that point it felt tacked on, even though the dlc extended the level cap by 10.

The idea is, if I haven't finished the game I can restart it every so often with the goal of getting further this time. If I'd actually finished it, replaying the would feel like...a replay. So, I have tons of games that are on the "still playing" back burner, which I could pick up or restart and justifiably feel like I'm going to make progress.

This doesn't hold for games I just want to experience once. Those I can barrel through and toss out. Anybody else have a weird disinclination to not finish games they really love?

Great thread! I have de-cloaked for my 2 bits:

Confessions

I used console cheats to max out my characters' XP at the start of Baldur's Gate 2
And I still found it hard... I did finish it though.

I have put hundreds, possibly thousands, of hours into Civ Rev on my PS3
My most-played game this generation. Yes it's dumbed down compared to proper Civ, but it's like a favourite pair of jeans. So familiar and snug.

I purchased the Game of Thrones video game at full price on day of release
The clerk smiled to himself when I bought it, but still took my money.

In my first game of XCOM, after I got a few favourite guys to Colonel I would reload whenever they died
I still played on Classic difficulty *wincing smile*

Blasphemies

I liked using the Mako in Mass Effect 1
It felt like I was exploring planets, unlike planet-scanning in ME2

I like Civ V better than Civ IV
Hexes, combat and diplomacy made it way more fun and interesting turn-by-turn, even if social policies aren't as flexible as the Civics system.

I don't care that Kratos is a dick
He's still my dick.

I'll get my coat.

Some me-toos from other folks' posts: I don't dig mouse & keyboard for PC gaming either, not a fan of JRPGs, Bioshock's twist did not wow me greatly.

Keithustus wrote:

I love E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial on Atari.

Good one! Me too. I was obsessed with this game and played it over and over and over again as a kid. I have no idea how well I was doing or if I ever finished it, because I dont think I knew what was going on, but I had fun.

Felix Threepaper wrote:

I have put hundreds, possibly thousands, of hours into Civ Rev on my PS3
My most-played game this generation. Yes it's dumbed down compared to proper Civ, but it's like a favourite pair of jeans. So familiar and snug.

I love Civ Rev too and I think I've put more time in to it between the DS and iPad than Civ 4 (which I love). Civ Rev gets a bad rap that really isn't deserved.

Felix Threepaper wrote:

I liked using the Mako in Mass Effect 1
It felt like I was exploring planets, unlike planet-scanning in ME2

I haven't played ME2 yet, but I enjoyed the Mako too. It brought home that feeling like I was really exploring the universe in a way I haven't felt since gathering materials in Starcon 2. I'm sad that it's been removed from ME2.

Felix Threepaper wrote:

I like Civ V better than Civ IV
Hexes, combat and diplomacy made it way more fun and interesting turn-by-turn, even if social policies aren't as flexible as the Civics system.

Civ V amused me a lot, because the ai is just as good as iv, which is pretty simple/bad. A simple ai can do stacks of doom and basic strategy no problem, it cannot do hex based combat in the slightest. Ironically this destroyed both games for me. I can't play iv anymore cause the combat sucks in comparision, and I can't play v cause the ai sucks at the combat. To be fair though civ iv only really took off by the second of third expansion.

ok on topic. I loved the baldur's gate series, I have never beaten the first one.

The problem with the Mako, and the scanning, and the pinging is taking you out of the game, out of the action, out of the story to pad time, put up barriers to you getting to the game, action, story. The Mako was not the problem, the problem was stretching out a single player experience with silly side games. Apparently Bioware thought we all loved playing Galaga so much in Jade Empire that we would be all up in some hinky lunar tank game play. When you have to fight Shai-Hulud on several occasions, that is exacerbated. Plus it just screams that someone in marketing went to creative and said "We need more Halo." It felt as bolted on as an OEM air splitter on a Honda Civic.

2 and 3 then get into more familiar territory by giving us everyone's favorite, rail gun scenes. As flawed as the Mako was, I would take that over rail guns any day.

That all being said. I have a new Blasphemy. New Bioware games are better than Old Bioware games. However, Old Black Isle games are better than New Obsidian games.

Mr GT Chris wrote:

I'm about 6 or so hours into FFVI so far and am having trouble getting into it.

Hm. I'm replaying it on the Vita and I'm 13 hours in and just as obsessed as I was when it was brand new. A lot of the customization options don't open up till later on, if that's a sticking point for you.

Running Man wrote:

Anybody else have a weird disinclination to not finish games they really love?

Not quite in the way you describe, but I used to play through games quickly, then get to what felt like 2/3 or 3/4 through and stop because I didn't want it to be over yet. Now I have less time to play so I prefer to finish a game and move on.

Which reminds me.

I think the game is over when the end credits roll.
At that point it's finished and I'm not going back to get 100% in every mission, or collect 352 hidden flags, or all the "achievements". Even if I had the time, why would I want to? If there's a good enough reason to go for a second playthrough, it's probably going to be shorter than the first, with less collecting and more getting on with the story.

I liked the Virtual Boy and 3D gaming in general.

My gaming PC is equipped with shutter glasses and I frequently play games in 3D.