Gaming Confessions & Blasphemy

Thin_J wrote:
ibdoomed wrote:

Achievements: The argument I've seen against my hatred of them is "just ignore them". That's generally not possible as they jump out and slap you in the face thus breaking any sort of ambiance/engrossment created by the game.

You know, at least on the 360, you can just turn notifications off and never see them.

Really? Hmm, had I known that from the beginning of the 360's launch, I might own more games than just spelunky. I know I've looked through all the options, somehow must have missed it.

Demosthenes wrote:

I can tell you, the only time I've gone achievement whore in games is where I really enjoy the games and want to get that did everything kind of feeling out of it... or it becomes a test of skill that I think may actually be feasible for me. Not necessarily easy, mind you (the train kills in Infamous being a good example of not easy in skill or willpower to keep going)... but interesting to me. That was why I enjoyed the achievements for World of Warcraft with raiding (stopped in Lich King, so dunno about anything post that)... Killing that robot by breaking his heart and then dealing with his whole new skillset and the enrage timer on him was hilariously fun. Some like killing the old god under Uld'uar without any help from the various gods was also fun in that it turned an already challenging fight into a whole new level of craziness.

That's where the line between achievement and objective is blurred. I wouldn't have such a problem with it if the notifications were more in-game contextual and less obnoxious.

Crockpot wrote:

Borderlands is not very fun and is not a very good multiplayer game!

I don't think gearbox really have a history of great games. They're good at producing stuff, and I think that's their main strength, but their games don't really have a good hook in singleplayer.

Hollowheel wrote:

The Uncharted games are boring. Dull gameplay. B-movie writing.

Dark Souls is the best game of the millennium.

Bastion is just okay.

Hard, punishing games "respect my time" more than hand-holding games I can complete in five hours while drunk and texting my friends.

There is so much truth here.

Uncharted is improperly billed as an action game instead of the interactive movie it really is and a terrible movie to boot.

Dark Souls is the best game of the millennium.

Bastion bored the hell out of me.

I found Planescape: Torment intolerably boring and wordy
Baldur's Gate is overrated as far as role playing games go and doesn't match up to the beauty of older Gold Box games from TSR

detroit20 wrote:

Online walkthroughs and guides are a blight on modern gaming. They effectively replace the joys of unexpected discovery with the dread that comes of fore-knowledge.

This I completely agree with.

detroit20 wrote:

Gameplay systems have become increasingly complicated, just as in-pack user manuals have disappeared and in-game tutorials have become perfunctory at best. The result is that many games such as Demons/Dark Souls (both of which I love, by the way) are all but unplayable without recourse to YouTube, a walkthrough or a friendly forum at one time or another.

But you lost me here. Personally I think one of the best parts of dark souls is exploration and discovery and you seem to contradict yourself and mention manuals, so I'm wondering if you mean controls or something?

Niseg wrote:

I HATE racing games. - if it's a race involving anything even snowboards.

IMAGE(http://www.michaelmbates.com/obamapointingsmall.jpg)

YOU. Are off my Christmas card list.

( :p )

This thread is a recipe for community toxicity...

I have Uncharted 1-3 on my shelf. I have all manner of Assassin's Creeds on said shelf. Haven't played any of them.
/shame

Vrikk wrote:

I think online multiplayer is boring, and will be the death of gaming.
I don't want to play more deathmatch games, listen to 13 year olds call me racist slurs, and lag out due to someone's slow internet.
All FPSs are boring if they cater towards multiplayer.
Associated to the above. Half-Life 2 was the last good FPS.

Thank you.

I've never played more than 3 hours of Final Fanasy Tactics. I don't get it.

The last time I played it was in high school. I really should try it out again and see if it makes more sense to me. I loved the gameplay of it, and understood that some crazy stuff was happening, but a chunk of the story definitely went over my head. Any chance this is on PSN? Might be a good time sync after I finish AC3 while waiting for the Skyrim DLC for the PS3.

EDIT: Clarifying my statement on FFT, which I really think is great and easily my favorite FF game by far.

NSMike wrote:

This thread is a recipe for community toxicity...

Yeah.

Quintin_Stone wrote:
NSMike wrote:

This thread is a recipe for community toxicity...

Yeah.

Only if handled badly I think, or at least no more than any other thread. Saying someone has a "wrong opinion" isn't heading down a good road though.

Aaron D. wrote:
Niseg wrote:

I HATE racing games. - if it's a race involving anything even snowboards.

IMAGE(http://www.michaelmbates.com/obamapointingsmall.jpg)

YOU. Are off my Christmas card list.

( :p )

Gotta take me off too. I hate the genre as a whole with the exceptions of one of the Mario Kart games for the DS and Crash Team Racing for the original PlayStation. I just don't get them at all.

Demosthenes wrote:
I've never played more than 3 hours of Final Fanasy Tactics. I don't get it.

The last time I played it was in high school. I really should try it out again and see if it is any better. Any chance this is on PSN? Might be a good time sync after I finish AC3 while waiting for the Skyrim DLC for the PS3.

Not only is the PS1 classic out there, the PSP version is free for PS+ subscribers at the moment.

Edit: HELL YEAH crash team racing!

Scratched wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:
NSMike wrote:

This thread is a recipe for community toxicity...

Yeah.

Only if handled badly I think, or at least no more than any other thread. Saying someone has a "wrong opinion" isn't heading down a good road though.

For my part, it's just in good fun (thus the smileys).

Hope no one is taking them as a serious slight.

I think we're all mature enough to respect each other's quirky opinions, and I find various counterarguments interesting reads.

psoplayer wrote:

Edit: HELL YEAH crash team racing!

AMEN to that! The only Mario Kart'ish game that was actually as good as Mario Kart. No, Diddy Kong Racing did not measure up. We should get a CTR appreciation thread or something up in here.

Scratched wrote:
Quintin_Stone wrote:
NSMike wrote:

This thread is a recipe for community toxicity...

Yeah.

Only if handled badly I think, or at least no more than any other thread. Saying someone has a "wrong opinion" isn't heading down a good road though.

That is clearly a wrong opinion.

[size=6]Hugs[/size]

Dyni wrote:
psoplayer wrote:

Edit: HELL YEAH crash team racing!

AMEN to that! The only Mario Kart'ish game that was actually as good as Mario Kart. No, Diddy Kong Racing did not measure up. We should get a CTR appreciation thread or something up in here.

I loved that game. Having really lived a Nintendo-free life, that was the first kart racer I ever played. Still think it's one of the best ones.

ibdoomed wrote:
detroit20 wrote:

Gameplay systems have become increasingly complicated, just as in-pack user manuals have disappeared and in-game tutorials have become perfunctory at best. The result is that many games such as Demons/Dark Souls (both of which I love, by the way) are all but unplayable without recourse to YouTube, a walkthrough or a friendly forum at one time or another.

But you lost me here. Personally I think one of the best parts of dark souls is exploration and discovery and you seem to contradict yourself and mention manuals, so I'm wondering if you mean controls or something?

@ibdoomed - That's a fair criticism of my post, so I'll try to clarify.

Exploration is a joy indeed a joy in 'Souls' games. However, there are elements of Demons/Dark Souls that I would argue are nigh on impossible for most players to find without outside assistance as there is no manual and the tutorials for neither game mention them.

I'm thinking particularly of the false walls that can only be found by striking them. However, I'd also argue that the fact that Platinum-ing (neologism?) those games requires you to discover pretty much every single in game item also qualifies as an impossible task without help.

In the pre-internet days, the only way a developer could cater for the gaming's completionists was to ensure that the game manual either told them where everything was or at least strongly hinted at strategies that would enable those players to find them. Now in these manual-less days you absolutely have to got to t'interweb.

Which brings me to another blasphemy:

I shamelessly use Walkthroughs and Guides... And I know that everyone who games does too!

+1 for your comments on the Uncharted series. I was willing to overlook this fault on Uncharted 2 because the story was such a rollicking good adventure. However, the poorness of the story and dialogue in 3 really threw the lack of action into sharp relief.

lots of people wrote:

I use guides

I've also got to a point where if the direction I'm supposed to be going in a game is eluding me, I'll hit the FAQs. I've even got a custom search keyword setup for it.

Far too often it's a "You wanted me to do what?" or "how the hell was I supposed to know that?" situation, which I suppose has to be balanced by NPCs screaming orders in my ear every 10 seconds at the slightest hint I'm not going to press a button at the earliest opportunity.

I can't think of one truly adult, artistic, philosophically-stimulating video game.

There are certainly hints of that in a lot of games of today, but nothing comes to mind that I could recommend to my non-gaming friends as being culturally important.

Ariskany Evan wrote:

I can't think of one truly adult, artistic, philosophically-stimulating video game.

There are certainly hints of that in a lot of games of today, but nothing comes to mind that I could recommend to my non-gaming friends as being culturally important.

Journey was that for me. I can't think of another.

Dyni wrote:
psoplayer wrote:

Edit: HELL YEAH crash team racing!

AMEN to that! The only Mario Kart'ish game that was actually as good as Mario Kart. No, Diddy Kong Racing did not measure up. We should get a CTR appreciation thread or something up in here.

Caveat: I haven't played it since 2001. It's been so long that my only memories of it are some jungle beats and being undefeated among my friends for nearly a year running. I'm worried that it wouldn't hold up very well if I were to return to it today. Then again, it is just sitting there on PSN.

Related: This guy points out that Naughty Dog has consistently produced a trilogy, followed it with a racing game, and then moved on to the next console. Uncharted Racing: Drake's Nitro coming 2013. Hopefully as a pack-in bonus with The Last of Us.

Ariskany Evan wrote:

I can't think of one truly adult, artistic, philosophically-stimulating video game.

There are certainly hints of that in a lot of games of today, but nothing comes to mind that I could recommend to my non-gaming friends as being culturally important.

If you haven't yet 'played' Dear Esther, give it a try. I finished it in 2-3 hours and was left with feelings i've never felt after completing a video game. Talk about a breath of fresh air; especially since the game I finished prior to Dear Esther was Amnesia.

Dyni wrote:
Ariskany Evan wrote:

I can't think of one truly adult, artistic, philosophically-stimulating video game.

There are certainly hints of that in a lot of games of today, but nothing comes to mind that I could recommend to my non-gaming friends as being culturally important.

Journey was that for me. I can't think of another.

I will second Journey and recommend you check out El Shaddai: Ascension of the Metatron. Tacked on to a middling combat game is truly phenomenal art style and a very poignant story based on some ancient ex-Biblical texts that deal with loss, friendship, family, and standing up for what you believe in. It was one of the best games I played last year. Not adult in an ultra-violent sense, but I don't think kids would like the game because the themes wouldn't really resonate with them. It also deals a lot with the tension between two philosophies espoused in "The Grand Inquisitor" chapter of Dostoevsky's grand work The Brothers Karamazov.

...I kinda want to go replay it now.

Dyni wrote:
Ariskany Evan wrote:

I can't think of one truly adult, artistic, philosophically-stimulating video game.

There are certainly hints of that in a lot of games of today, but nothing comes to mind that I could recommend to my non-gaming friends as being culturally important.

Journey was that for me. I can't think of another.

I thought about Journey, as I adored it... but to me it was amazing in that it was a videogame. The arc of the journey was formulaic and the message, though well executed, was seeped in platitudes. It certainly does way more than most videogames, and I love it for that, but it's not enough (for me...).

brouhaha wrote:

If you haven't yet 'played' Dear Esther, give it a try. I finished it in 2-3 hours and was left with feelings i've never felt after completing a video game. Talk about a breath of fresh air; especially since the game I finished prior to Dear Esther was Amnesia. :shock:

Yes! Of course. I knew I was forgetting things.

Ariskany Evan wrote:

I can't think of one truly adult, artistic, philosophically-stimulating video game.

There are certainly hints of that in a lot of games of today, but nothing comes to mind that I could recommend to my non-gaming friends as being culturally important.

I agree that games are just kind of nibbling around the edges of that, but I'm not sure it'll ever happen. That said, I think at least partially it's an absurd thing to attempt, and will happen by accident. It doesn't help when you've got so many eyes examining things from every angle, can you have gun shooting to kill a man without someone claiming that at some level it's just another generic murder simulator, or nudity/genitals without saying they're there for juvenile titillation.

It's more than just the games which need to be looked at.

From that, why is it any time there's some form of friendship between two characters in a game, one of whom may be a player, there's always the conclusion that involves bumping uglies. Why can't it just explore a good friendship development and maybe but not always imply that it progresses off-screen, even after the main story which the game is telling is over and done with.

Quintin_Stone wrote:
NSMike wrote:

This thread is a recipe for community toxicity...

Yeah.

Because expressing an opinion is a terrible thing.

I think people here are mature enough to handle it. Even though I don't agree with a lot of people here I am enjoying reading other people's opinions on some of these things and getting different view points.

People who play multiplayer games with no pants and with no underwear are weird.

Pfff, much better now that's off my chest.

NSMike wrote:

This thread is a recipe for community toxicity...

I disagree. I actually feel closer to many people now that I see I'm not the only one that hates halo, call of duty, achievements, etc...

Ariskany Evan wrote:
Dyni wrote:
Ariskany Evan wrote:

I can't think of one truly adult, artistic, philosophically-stimulating video game.

There are certainly hints of that in a lot of games of today, but nothing comes to mind that I could recommend to my non-gaming friends as being culturally important.

Journey was that for me. I can't think of another.

I thought about Journey, as I adored it... but to me it was amazing in that it was a videogame. The arc of the journey was formulaic and the message, though well executed, was seeped in platitudes. It certainly does way more than most videogames, and I love it for that, but it's not enough (for me...).

I know what you mean. I just played through Journey for the first time ever last night. Beautifully executed experience - great visuals, nice sense of discovery to things but no moments of ambiguous frustration, the online component was fun, and the pacing of it all was nigh-on perfect. Thematically, though, it only had weight in the moment of the experience. There are a few moments I experienced, particularly with other players, that really provoked an emotional response in the moment itself, but not of the sort that I could articulate as having value or meaning outside of those moments. It's a very artistic effort, and I really loved it, but in the way of meaning, the overly-universal thematic trappings are maybe too generic to talk about as being deep or mature - they're pretty simple. That's not a bad thing, mind you, and I'm not calling the game a failure. I think it's very successful at what it does. But I don't think there's anything philosophically stimulating about it - what I'd tell friends is, "Set aside an evening and play it, it'll be a unique personal experience you'll be enthralled with for the duration. But just the duration."

Philosophical stimulation is a pretty high mark, mind you. I can't think of a game that's really done it. Maybe a few situations involving moral/ethical questions relative to choices of the player are as close as I've been pushed, but I think that's still different - we're talking about provoking a response vs. making me think about something for hours or days after the fact, you know?