Proposals and Ballot Initiatives (Catch All)

CA has some juicy amendments that are relatively getting no coverage at all.

Prop 34 - change death penalty to life without parole
Prop 36 - change three strikes law to only get third strike on violent or serious felonies
Prop 35 - stricter sentencing for human trafficking

The ones getting a ton of coverage:

Prop 32 - campaign finance reform that only affects unions and not corporations
Prop 37 - mandatory labeling for genetically modified foods

Some Coverage

Prop 39 - taxing out of state businesses on business done in CA; a lot of CA based companies that did most of its business in CA moved to arizona and nevada to avoid CA's higher taxes;
Prop 30 - $200 million of state taxes goes to local governments for k-12 school improvements

CannibalCrowley wrote:
KingGorilla wrote:

As more and more states and municipalities demonstrate that they are unable or unfit to educate their citizens, it lends power to a more sweeping national education program. We need such a program in order to become competitive internationally on education again.

No we don't. National anything tends to over spend and under deliver for what it costs. Besides, what we need to compete internationally in education is parents who care and you can't legislate that.

Well or we take the Neil Degrasse Tyson opinion, and find a way to make education a part of the war machine. That gets us from no space program to planting a flag on the moon in under 10 years. NASA was not exactly working with the largest budget to do that either.

You also do not address the issue with that view of government and that small concept of federalism. You have no solution for when states begin to utterly fail their citizens. A shrug of the shoulders, which this "argument" is solves nothing.

KingGorilla wrote:

Well or we take the Neil Degrasse Tyson opinion, and find a way to make education a part of the war machine. That gets us from no space program to planting a flag on the moon in under 10 years. NASA was not exactly working with the largest budget to do that either.

You also do not address the issue with that view of government and that small concept of federalism. You have no solution for when states begin to utterly fail their citizens. A shrug of the shoulders, which this "argument" is solves nothing.

I thought your concern was education? Last I checked that was a local issue and frankly it boils down to parental involvement. Show me a school district where the parents are involved and it's probably a good learning environment. This isn't a problem that can be solved by throwing money at it or instituting a national curriculum.

What we need to do nationally is abandon this "everyone must go to college" mentality. Start pushing some kids toward apprenticeships and trade schools while acknowledging that for many it's a superior fit.

As for when districts fail to provide a decent education, there are plenty of options available: charter schools, neighboring districts (in some states), private schools, homeschooling, or working with others to fix the district.

Maryland still too close to call for Gay Marriage and Gambling. I expect Gay Marriage to pass, but Gambling to lose.

Young Turks have been running adverts saying vote for prop 34. (Or whatever vote gets rid of the death penalty.)

1Dgaf wrote:

Young Turks have been running adverts saying vote for prop 34. (Or whatever vote gets rid of the death penalty.)

Where's? That's a state vote somewhere.

CannibalCrowley wrote:

I thought your concern was education? Last I checked that was a local issue and frankly it boils down to parental involvement. Show me a school district where the parents are involved and it's probably a good learning environment. This isn't a problem that can be solved by throwing money at it or instituting a national curriculum.

Actually, you can solve it by throwing money at the problem. It's called preschool. Good preschool programs can overcome most of the negative impacts of sh*tty parents. And for them, there's actually government programs to teach them how not to be so sh*tty.

The bonus is that there's several longitudinal studies out there showing how preschool programs are actually huge money savers for societies: preschool kids are more likely to have a job, make more money, not be in jail, not get pregnant as a teenager, and a whole host of other good things.

This is the second video they've done.

Ah, California. I know they have automatic appeals for the death penalty, which is probably why it costs them so much. I wonder how much the death penalty "costs" in Texas.

Looks very likely at this point that both CO and WA will legalize pot. Good for them. Watch out for the DEA's jackbooted thugs!

EDIT: and VA passes an eminent domain amendment restricting government seizure of property. Good for them.

Looks like MD loves gay marriage and gambling (and by "loves" I mean narrowly passed 51-49, 52-48).
Unless I read the numbers wrong, in which case they were narrowly defeated.

Maine legalizes gay marriage as well.

Ah, I knew I had a conservative streak in me, while I'm against giving out freebies to illegal immigrants on principle if this is accurate:

Under the law, (MD dream act) students who qualify for the tuition benefit must first attend community college. Those who receive an associate degree or at least 60 credits at the two-year school can then qualify for a tuition discount at a four-year university.

I guess I'm okay with it. I'm a pragmatist and meritocratic.
At first I was really really pissed cause I had to give proof of my state residency when I went to community college to get the in-state discount (although that was in a different state).

  • Initiative Measure No. 1185 - 60% approval for any raising of taxes in the state legislature - Passed
  • Initiative Measure No. 1240 Concerns creation of a public charter school system - Passed
  • Referendum Measure No. 74 Concerns marriage for same-sex couples - PASSED
  • Initiative Measure No. 502 Concerns legalizing recreational marijuana - PASSED
  • Engrossed Senate Joint Resolution No. 8221 Concerns implementing the Commission on State Debt recommendations regarding Washington's debt limit - Passed
  • Senate Joint Resolution No. 8223 Concerns investments by the University of Washington and Washington State University - Rejected
  • Advisory Vote No. 1 (Engrossed Senate Bill 6635) Concerns a B&O tax deduction for certain financial institutions' interest on residential loans - Passed
  • Advisory Vote No. 2 (Substitute House Bill 2590) Concerns expiration of a tax on possession of petroleum products - Passed

http://vote.wa.gov/results/20121106/...

Edwin wrote:

[list]
[*]Initiative Measure No. 1185 - 60% approval for any raising of taxes in the state legislature - Passed

Ooof. Those always scare me a lot. I hope it doesn't go too poorly. :l

The anti-gay marriage amendment is getting way too close to passing. There's still a third of Hennepin (Minneapolis), a quarter of Ramsey (St. Paul) and almost all of St. Louis (Duluth and a lot of empty space) left so I'm assuming it will end up not passing. Either way I hate the people in this state. Almost half of them are very stupid.

Remember that in Minnesota, the yes votes for the gay marriage ban has to be at 50.0% or higher. Even if there are more yes votes than no votes, if the yeas are 49.999999999999%, the measure fails.

Minarchist wrote:

Looks very likely at this point that both CO and WA will legalize pot. Good for them. Watch out for the DEA's jackbooted thugs!

EDIT: and VA passes an eminent domain amendment restricting government seizure of property. Good for them.

Just remember, it's technically legal for the federal government to declare all potheads "terror suspects" that can be held indefinitely without trial. So don't get too excited about newfound freedoms at the state level.

jdzappa wrote:
Minarchist wrote:

Looks very likely at this point that both CO and WA will legalize pot. Good for them. Watch out for the DEA's jackbooted thugs!

EDIT: and VA passes an eminent domain amendment restricting government seizure of property. Good for them.

Just remember, it's technically legal for the federal government to declare all potheads "terror suspects" that can be held indefinitely without trial. So don't get too excited about newfound freedoms at the state level.

Is that any different from medical marijuana users?

Looks like all 6 proposals failed in Michigan.
So the current emergency financial manager law was repealed. There was not a new union made for home care workers. The constitution was not amended to put the force of rights behind our unions (I would really like to repeal the police union amendment as it has been a cluster F), A simple majority in our legislator will be able to make tax policy, No green energy amendment that really bugs me, but no silly bridge law and that twit Moroun (Pronounced Maroon; you can't make that up) spent 33 million dollars to fail.

1Dgaf wrote:

Young Turks have been running adverts saying vote for prop 34. (Or whatever vote gets rid of the death penalty.)

I looked it up and I don't think it passed which is rather unfortunate. The death penalty is a state suctioned 1st degree murder . I think that the campaigners want is to save money they can just cancel the appeal process and execute people 2 days after the verdict. It's probably cheaper to execute an innocent person than to go through the appeal process.

OG_slinger wrote:

Actually, you can solve it by throwing money at the problem. It's called preschool. Good preschool programs can overcome most of the negative impacts of sh*tty parents. And for them, there's actually government programs to teach them how not to be so sh*tty.

The bonus is that there's several longitudinal studies out there showing how preschool programs are actually huge money savers for societies: preschool kids are more likely to have a job, make more money, not be in jail, not get pregnant as a teenager, and a whole host of other good things.

Does preschool equal higher success rates because it's a magic wand or because parents who enroll their kids in preschool tend to care more about education than those who won't even read to their kids. In my experience, even tuition-free preschool runs into the parent issue since the kids generally aren't quite up to getting off to school on their own yet.

As for teaching parents how not to be sh*tty, it's a matter of effort not knowledge. The sad fact is that there are plenty of parents whose part in the education process is little more than telling their kids to go to school.

CannibalCrowley wrote:

Does preschool equal higher success rates because it's a magic wand or because parents who enroll their kids in preschool tend to care more about education than those who won't even read to their kids. In my experience, even tuition-free preschool runs into the parent issue since the kids generally aren't quite up to getting off to school on their own yet.

More magic wand. The two most famous longitudinal studies--the Carolina Abecedarian Project and the Perry Preschool Program--involved children from low income families who were separated into two groups. One group was the control and they got nothing. They were simply raised by their parents as they saw fit. The second group was enrolled in preschool, something their parents could not afford on their own.

The Planet Money podcast I linked to is only about 20 minutes long and well worth the listen.

So we still have the death penalty in CA and genetically modified food doesn't need to be labeled. There was a lot of ads for the latter so I am surprised it didn't pass.

But human trafficking will carry stricter penalties, and the 3 strikes law has become less draconian. (lots of margin on that one though with what constitutes "violent" or "serious")

Oh and the unions weren't nerfed in the guise of campaign finance reform.

Living in Colorado feels good man.

mrwynd wrote:

Living in Colorado feels good man.

We shall revisit this in January.

Hypatian wrote:
Edwin wrote:

[list]
[*]Initiative Measure No. 1185 - 60% approval for any raising of taxes in the state legislature - Passed

Ooof. Those always scare me a lot. I hope it doesn't go too poorly. :l

I've always felt like if you have a measure that requires X% of support, you should have to get X% of voters to pass it.

KingGorilla wrote:
mrwynd wrote:

Living in Colorado feels good man.

We shall revisit this in January.

Too bad it's still illegal under federal law. I wouldn't expect to see too much change just yet.

mr_n00b wrote:
KingGorilla wrote:
mrwynd wrote:

Living in Colorado feels good man.

We shall revisit this in January.

Too bad it's still illegal under federal law. I wouldn't expect to see too much change just yet.

I do. Pot being federally illegal did not stop a huge market in marijuana dispensaries popping up or doctors prescribing it for such rare ailments as "back kinda hurts sometimes." How many Feds looking to bust a dude with a doobie do you see camping outside New Belgium?

Didn't the DEA raid a handful of California dispensaries just a couple months ago?