Space Sims/Strategy Games Catch-All

Hey friends, for nearly the past year, I've been striving to be a full-time streamer, but that will be put on hold as I start a new gig on 7/1. It's remote, so I'll still have time to stream, I'll just be pulling back on the hours and the variety a bit (you can read in detail about the changes here). In order to save myself time and mental energy as well, I'll no longer be posting here each week about what's coming up as well. You can see this on our calendar as well as keep an eye out on social media for updates and changes to things. Thanks so much for supporting me this past year, and I hope to see y'all on a stream or in a comment somewhere.

Best of luck with your new job, Veloxi !

Yep! Do well and hopefully get some relaxing in.

Thanks guys!

Best wishes with the new gig. I hope it works out for you.

Best of luck!

Thank you guys!

Mixolyde wrote:

I don't know if it counts, but Cloudpunk is still on sale for a few more hours. You play the driver of a flying taxi delivery service in a floating cyberpunk city. As you make deliveries you interact with the cities denizens, learn its secrets and reveal interesting stuff.
It looks beautiful, too.

Here's the second part of that playthrough. It's still on sale for 25% off ($15) until 9 July.

I'm not really into walking (driving) sims, but this does look nice. Of course I'm not sure why I would play if I watch both halves of this playthrough...

So friends, I’ve now gotten into the planetary invasions portion of Star Fleet II and it’s made me love the game all the more. I’m over 80 hours in and it’s all I want to play, but I have to limit myself to just playing on stream so my reactions are genuine.

Planetary invasions are amazing by the way. It’s pretty much a separate game that links back to the original game somehow. It’s so detailed they spawned it off into its own game a few years later called Star Legions.

But holy sh*t this game. It’s astounding. Other games wish it could be this game. I’ve never felt a game give more a feeling of being in command of a starship than this one. It’s the best Trek game ever made that isn’t Trek, and I can’t wait for it to come to Steam soon. We’re helping the original dev find bugs and come up with QoL improvements to make it play better, so hopefully it’ll hit Steam this year.

So I just wanted to rave about this amazing thing. Thanks for listening.

That was a favorite game of mine for years (along with various versions of Empire). I had high hopes for the next game in the series, but... Oh well. It will be good to get back to it, though.

Man, if you played the original, you're gonna love all the bugfixes and improvements that have been added. For example, in the original game, you had to manually resupply your escorts, now a supply ship will resupply your whole battlefleet at a go.

Back in the day, that was just part of the gameplay. We had... different expectations lol.

Robear wrote:

Back in the day, that was just part of the gameplay. We had... different expectations lol.

I've talked about this in relation to the game before, but there's a difference I feel between complex and complicated. Complex is a game wherein, if you invest enough time and effort, you'll be rewarded by an enhanced experience and knowledge of the game. Star Fleet II is complex.

Complicated is wherein a game is poorly-enough designed that you never feel competent at it. This is more of the Battlecruiser 3000 ilk, in my opinion.

Streamlining things like fleet supply removes none of the complexity from this amazing game, only some of the tedium, letting you move onto the truly fun stuff. It also makes more sense in-universe as well. What Krellan commander has the patience to manually resupply each one of their escorts? Feh, those folks on the resupply ship should handle that. Now they do.

Things like this actually keep the game from becoming complicated, I feel. This will work better for a modern audience. It gives me hope and joy that one of our playtesters is in his 20s and loves this game.

I think this is projecting backwards, a bit. I agree that it's complicated in some ways, but that's the result of slow screen refreshes, lack of a real windowing system, and slow computation as well. You'll notice that he's broken the screen up into informational areas, and each one is interactive; this is a form of textual windowing that was widely taught in the 80's, and it's a rational display of information. But the processing speed and limited RAM meant that any idea of separate screens, except when additional information needed to be input, was out of the question. Further, the interface had to accommodate people without mice, so everything was text input (as I recall).

So the idea of "technical" or complex games back then was to try to represent a sort of military commander's screen on the low-res, low color screens of the time. (I won't swear to it, but I bet you could play this game on a mono-color display; I know the first game could be.) And that means that you had to memorize keys in order to get the best out of the game.

But it was not complicated for complecation's sake, as you imply. The interface was complicated in parts for perfectly reasonable design decisions, knowing that the audience would be, by far, college students and technical professionals who were already working with computers and dealing with technology-forced complications that we simply forget existed. (I actually had to develop and turn in for checking a truth table for a set of 25 or so firewall rules that I manually designed for an early Cisco firewall... And that was not the most obtuse thing I ever did with computers lol. Yes, for a year or two, people wanted formal logic skills in their firewall installers...)

I agree it will make the game more accessible, and that's crucial. But it's not shedding an unfortunate design choice, it's rewiring with modern tooling what was absolutely necessary and efficient at the time.

(I will also point out that things like the refueling were not an issue, because they went on while other things were processing, and those things took real time to finish, so the player had plenty of time to fill. Keeping them busy was not the worst strategy for engagement... But it's not something that's obvious if you forget or never had to deal with how *slow* those systems actually were.)

Anyway, just my perspective and memory of these things.

Nononon I don't think it was complicated to resupply your escorts, I think it was needlessly tedious, which could border on complicated if a commander didn't remember to do it, and suddenly you're losing escorts because they're out of supplies and energy. A new feature like this I feel makes sense in making the game more efficient and more realistic. I mean I doubt the commander of a carrier battle group personally oversees the supplies of the entire group. There are people below them for that. This is the same thing.

Also the interface really isn't complicated. It LOOKS so at first, but once you use it for a little bit you'll find it's beautifully efficient.

This is what happens when a game is designed by an actual rocket scientist.

So actually we kind of agree... I think I misread your point.

Maybe. We do need more playtesters if you'd like to help us bring it to Steam. If so PM me.

Well surprise, surprise surprise, look what just dropped on Steam out of nowhere.

https://store.steampowered.com/app/1...

Man, I know I played that. I may still even have the disc somewhere. But I don't remember anything about it.

Big update for Star Traders: Frontiers, as a bunch of feature development ended at the same time as lots of bug fixes. You can now plan out a new ship build, with a tool, down to each component, to see what it will be like. Also, there's now the ability to entirely run crew combat with the keyboard.

Veloxi wrote:

Well surprise, surprise surprise, look what just dropped on Steam out of nowhere.

https://store.steampowered.com/app/1...

2003? Is it any good?

Stele wrote:

2003? Is it any good?

It's INSANELY meh. It was originally meant to be a 3D battle module for Space Empires V, but they for some reason scrapped that and made a whole separate game out of it. Came out the same year as Freelancer. Which one do you remember?

Veloxi wrote:
Stele wrote:

2003? Is it any good?

It's INSANELY meh. It was originally meant to be a 3D battle module for Space Empires V, but they for some reason scrapped that and made a whole separate game out of it. Came out the same year as Freelancer. Which one do you remember? ;)

Master of Orion 3?

Or maybe KotOR, if I limit this to games I remember fondly.

I...don't understand the question...?

That's what he remembers, Veloxi, choice C lol.

Robear wrote:

That's what he remembers, Veloxi, choice C lol.

Right-O.

I never played the two Veloxi named, but as far as 2003 was concerned I will never forget MoO3.

Yeah, that crashed and burned with a *spectactular* flame...

Due to a combination of refund coupons and discounts, I got paid money to buy Master of Orion 3.

For some reason I still spent dozens and dozens of hours playing it.

Gremlin wrote:

For some reason I still spent dozens and dozens of hours playing it.

I did too. I really wanted to love that game. And it always punched me in the junk.