Truth

Duoae wrote:
Robear wrote:

Yes. Renton was for much of the time in Skagboys, and several of the others had attempted higher education. Even in Trainspotting, they still socialize like (and with, if I recall) college students.

In England they are called Secondary school students..... BIG difference!

;)

Higher Education in the UK is college/undergraduate level education.

Secondary school students are in "secondary education" which is equivalent to US high school level. In England the schools are usually called Secondary Schools and in most of Scotland they are usually called high schools.

DanB wrote:
Duoae wrote:
Robear wrote:

Yes. Renton was for much of the time in Skagboys, and several of the others had attempted higher education. Even in Trainspotting, they still socialize like (and with, if I recall) college students.

In England they are called Secondary school students..... BIG difference!

;)

Higher Education in the UK is college/undergraduate level education.

Secondary school students are in "secondary education" which is equivalent to US high school level. In England the schools are usually called Secondary Schools and in most of Scotland they are usually called high schools.

It was a joke. The smiley was an indication...

I am English.

Spoiler:

Sure, it was an "underage" joke to do with the guy in trainspotting hooking up with that high school girl...

Oh what sad times are these when the English don't get their own humor.

[size=2]and when passing ruffians can say, "Ni!" at will to old ladies[/size]

Robear wrote:

FiveIron, this article may be of interest as an overview of the topic. You sound a bit like a realist, but that whole bit about truth being objective and universal, as opposed to "relative" (to what?), seems to be conflating truth with ethical principles or the like.

The idea that truth is something that "will work in every situation and for everyone" isn't really about truth. Truth doesn't *do* anything; in fact, in some theories, truth is *redundant*; if something exists, it is true, and nothing more need be asserted to make it so. It's either a claim about the existence of an objective reality (something that underlies most theories of truth) or a claim about ethical principles in some way. This is reinforced by your connection of truth (the assessment of statements about the world) with the idea of "bettering one's self", which is a real non sequitor. The "good results for good intentions" idea being connected to truth is even more logical jumps away...

Do you see a difference between ethics and truth? What is it? How is ethics (a code of behavior based on moral beliefs) connected to whether we can make accurate assertions about the world? For example, Jewish ethics claim that one should not eat pork, or touch a menstruating woman, although the latter could be cleansed in the Temple, when it existed. Are these behaviors based on accurate assertions about the world? Should they be? Should every moral principle be based on an assessment of the truth of it's assumptions? Consider "Thou shalt have no gods before me." This is a moral principle, but is it based on an accurate claim about the world? Should it be?

You may find a recent book by Harry G Frankfurt interesting. It's called "On Truth". He's professor emeritus of Philosophy at Princeton. I just picked it up; it looks like it would fit the discussion.

just bought the book on Nook. looks good so far.