F*** You, Cancer! Catch all

fangblackbone wrote:

Seriously. You guys are troopers. I am at a lost for words this morning but I planned to say something more heartfelt than "hang in there". But that is the only thing I seem capable of typing :(

Honestly, that is all that is needed for me.

My dad needs me to be strong for him. My family needs me to be strong for them.

99 % of the time, I am good with that. The other 1% of the time? Comments like yours give me strength to keep going.

Treatment update on my dad (spoilered for length)

Spoiler:

So, my dad had his appointment (by telephone) with his oncologist on Monday, here is the information they got.
The scan they did last week has confirmed the cancer has spread to his lungs. They can't tell the exact size, but there are numerous spots. They aren't entirely certain yet how much these locations are impacting his health, but he has been coughing more over the past month or so. The blood tests they did gave no additional information. The enzyme that is used to detect cancer is still over 200. (200 is the maximum the test can detect). Because the cancer is not in the original location, it is considered generalized.

The first chemotherapy session will start wednesday the 23rd and every 2 weeks afterwards. After he is done each session, he will have a bag attached that will continue to give him chemotherapy drugs for another 2 days, that he will then go to the CLSC to have removed. The day befoie each session he has to get his weight measured and his blood taken to measure various things.

He has gotten drugs to counteract any of the side effects from the chemotherapy, including (but not limited to) nausea, pain, dizziness, headaches, cramps, sweating and diarrhea.

Because of the chemotherapy, his immune system will be very weak, so if he has 2 days of a fever over 38, he has to go to the hospital. If his fever hits 39, he has to go to the ER immediately.

There are additional possible side effects such as mouth ulcers, nosebleeds, and dry eyes, and there is an increased risk of strokes and heart attacks.

There is no precise diet that is needed, but the morning of his treatments he has to eat a good breakfast and drink lots of water.

Good luck with it! Chemo can often do a good job of extending life. He's probably also going to have some pretty strong exhaustion at times, so try to keep him active. (At least, that's what people say on the prostate cancer groups.)

I'm glad he has this chance and I hope it gets you more valuable time with him.

Robear wrote:

Good luck with it! Chemo can often do a good job of extending life. He's probably also going to have some pretty strong exhaustion at times, so try to keep him active. (At least, that's what people say on the prostate cancer groups.)

I'm glad he has this chance and I hope it gets you more valuable time with him.

We go for regular walks, and I am spending way, way more time with him than I normally would have. That's great, but in hindsight, I wish it wouldn't have taken this to have it happen.

He got his hair buzzed today, back to the length he had it when he started basic training in the Canadian Forces about 65ish years ago.

He still wears it really well.

Change rarely comes without some precipitating event or need. Everyone just carries on with life until something happens, then they realize what needs to be different. And then the reactions occur, different for everyone.

From my experience, walks with family members, even short routine dog walking and such, are far more meaningful now than they were before (and I liked them before). Just the exposure to the world, to nature, silent together, or talking about the day, it's really calming and satisfying. I hope you find the same joy in everyday things with your Dad.