Don't want to go to school? It's OK, God said so...

I agree wholeheartedly with your final statement. I just don't think it should be solely leveled at homeschoolers.

I'll just point out here that I specifically said "people" and not home schoolers. I just want to be clear that was my intent despite singling you out in the sentence before.

I also want to state that I did read and do appreciate the homophobic concerns you mentioned. And I could not be happier that home schooling allowed you to skip some of that experience. (though I die a little inside concerning the reality of that in this day and age)

My schooling was in a bubble. And there was nothing that hit that point home more than when I flunked out of the first year of college after breezing through high school.

RoughneckGeek wrote:

I'll give up the ditch-digger comment then. Instead I'm merely socially inept, don't know how to interact with people and ill prepared for the global workplace. ;)

I can vouch for that!

If there's one thing Quintin knows, it's social ineptitude. *nod nod*

Totes.

Closest thing to a relevant thread not buried.

Chicago Teacher's Strike Ends

What drew my attention:

In Illinois, all high school juniors and seniors are required to take the ACT test, whether they plan to attend college or not. Public school teachers in Chicago who took the test when they were in high school averaged a score of 19 out of a possible 36 — which is worse than the average median score for all students nationwide.

Now many of us here are not fans of "teach to the test" but in the same breath we want the education to help kids on those tests that are so important to getting into colleges.

Is this a symptom that public schools are not courting the academic achievers? Is it a symptom that anyone can get his or her teaching certificate?

KingGorilla wrote:

Closest thing to a relevant thread not buried.

Chicago Teacher's Strike Ends

What drew my attention:

In Illinois, all high school juniors and seniors are required to take the ACT test, whether they plan to attend college or not. Public school teachers in Chicago who took the test when they were in high school averaged a score of 19 out of a possible 36 — which is worse than the average median score for all students nationwide.

Now many of us here are not fans of "teach to the test" but in the same breath we want the education to help kids on those tests that are so important to getting into colleges.

Is this a symptom that public schools are not courting the academic achievers? Is it a symptom that anyone can get his or her teaching certificate?

Is there any evidence that we need rocket scientists to teach or that there's any link between a teacher's ACT score and their ability to teach effectively?

KingGorilla wrote:

Closest thing to a relevant thread not buried.

Chicago Teacher's Strike Ends

What drew my attention:

In Illinois, all high school juniors and seniors are required to take the ACT test, whether they plan to attend college or not. Public school teachers in Chicago who took the test when they were in high school averaged a score of 19 out of a possible 36 — which is worse than the average median score for all students nationwide.

Now many of us here are not fans of "teach to the test" but in the same breath we want the education to help kids on those tests that are so important to getting into colleges.

Is this a symptom that public schools are not courting the academic achievers? Is it a symptom that anyone can get his or her teaching certificate?

Not for the article itself and its radical proposal, but I think the data in it is relevant:

A lot of Chicago parents with the resources to do so have followed Emanuel's lead: 17% of schoolchildren in Chicago attend private schools, and so don't have to trouble themselves with whether or not their local public school has air conditioning, or a library (160 do not), or classes with 45 students. Those kids that don't attend private schools tend overwhelmingly to be from families with less political power and resources than Emanuel's: 87% of them are from low-income families, and 86% are black or hispanic.

Nationwide, where 10% of the nation's students—and 16% of the white ones from families making more than $75,000 per year—attend private schools, the stratification is similar. White and asian students enroll in private schools at twice the rate of black and hispanic ones, according to Harvard University's Civil Rights Project. Nearly two thirds of private-school students are from wealthy families. In the nation's 40 largest school districts, one in three white students attends private school (the number is one in ten for black students).

KingGorilla wrote:

Closest thing to a relevant thread not buried.

Chicago Teacher's Strike Ends

What drew my attention:

In Illinois, all high school juniors and seniors are required to take the ACT test, whether they plan to attend college or not. Public school teachers in Chicago who took the test when they were in high school averaged a score of 19 out of a possible 36 — which is worse than the average median score for all students nationwide.

Now many of us here are not fans of "teach to the test" but in the same breath we want the education to help kids on those tests that are so important to getting into colleges.

Is this a symptom that public schools are not courting the academic achievers? Is it a symptom that anyone can get his or her teaching certificate?

Well, if public schools paid like they wanted the best and the brightest, they'd probably get the best and the brightest.

KingGorilla wrote:

Closest thing to a relevant thread not buried.

Chicago Teacher's Strike Ends

What drew my attention:

In Illinois, all high school juniors and seniors are required to take the ACT test, whether they plan to attend college or not. Public school teachers in Chicago who took the test when they were in high school averaged a score of 19 out of a possible 36 — which is worse than the average median score for all students nationwide.

Now many of us here are not fans of "teach to the test" but in the same breath we want the education to help kids on those tests that are so important to getting into colleges.

Is this a symptom that public schools are not courting the academic achievers? Is it a symptom that anyone can get his or her teaching certificate?

I'll step in here for a moment. A little background. I was a national merit scholar, top 10% of my class, national champ I. Academic Games... Blah blah blah. I graduated from a certain university with a double major in poly sci and history in 3 years and a masters in education.

On paper, this made me the type of teacher that everyone has dreams about....and within 2 years, I failed out of teaching and never ever ever ever wanted to go back.

Teaching is a skill that has little to do with the ACT/SAT. Hell they have little to do with anything, but I digress.

You don't need the smartest to be a great teacher, you need the teachers with the greatest ability to take a topic and distill it down to the level and skill set of the students. And that skill set will vary wildly based on the age, intelligence, living circumstance, and other issues.

One of the biggest issues I noticed was that on my first day, I had the same number of kids and total responsibilities as a tenured teacher of 20 years. But it was worse for me because, not only did I have to make my plans from scrap, but I had to deal with the classes that they didn't want to. Experienced teachers got to pick the level of classes they wanted in the subjects they wanted, whereas, I had to take the leftovers. This really shouldn't happen, new teachers should be put in a situation where they can succeed. Granted, I taught in Florida, but from the teachers I spoke with elsewhere, this is not an uncommon situation.

You want a better system? Go into the system and work with the people who are there to try to fix it. Teachers aren't stupid. The reason that they took the job in the first place is that they wanted to help the kids, not for the money...heck, the county I worked in was paying trash collectors 15% more than teachers were being paid and I still took the teaching job...