Organic Food May Not Be Healthier For You, Says Study

ruhk wrote:
That's why it's far more important to just buy local and support smaller businesses/farmers than whether or not one buys organic. It's more about the health of the community than it is personal health.

Also, getting a full blown organic farm certification can take a looong time and lots of money. I'm not afraid of eating local even if it's not organic. Most of the time it's still just as all-natural as certified organic stuff, they just have some technicality (like being within xxx miles of a non organic field) that prevents them from being certified.

Humans are supposed to grow their own food - barring that, we should at least make effort to know the people who grow it.

Seth wrote:
ruhk wrote:
That's why it's far more important to just buy local and support smaller businesses/farmers than whether or not one buys organic. It's more about the health of the community than it is personal health.

Also, getting a full blown organic farm certification can take a looong time and lots of money. I'm not afraid of eating local even if it's not organic. Most of the time it's still just as all-natural as certified organic stuff, they just have some technicality (like being within xxx miles of a non organic field) that prevents them from being certified.

Humans are supposed to grow hunt and gather their own food - barring that, we should at least make effort to know the people who grow it.

Don't forget, agriculture's a blip in the grand scheme, when it comes to humanity.

Seth wrote:
ruhk wrote:
That's why it's far more important to just buy local and support smaller businesses/farmers than whether or not one buys organic. It's more about the health of the community than it is personal health.

Also, getting a full blown organic farm certification can take a looong time and lots of money. I'm not afraid of eating local even if it's not organic. Most of the time it's still just as all-natural as certified organic stuff, they just have some technicality (like being within xxx miles of a non organic field) that prevents them from being certified.

One thing that I think about when this comes up is antibiotics. I worry about industrial farms overusing antibiotics, steroids, etc. in their stock. OTOH, I also don't want an otherwise well-treated cow to suffer and/or die because it wasn't allowed to have antibiotics because "organic."

It's just very hard to come up with a set of rules that permit arm's length transactions for stuff like this. Much like lending, you can make better decisions if you have a relationship with the person you're doing business with.

sorry, dp

So umm, when we refute nonsense based claims about Organic foods. We are talking snake oil salesman stuff here. Just one Example from Jenny McCarthy that Organic Vegetarian diets can cure autism. When others are claiming that pure organic raw or organic juice diets are healthier and you get more nutrition than cooking the food or even from chewing it and swallowing.

But some of the news and blog writers must spring into action to justify their own superiority complex.

Why am I reading this the same way when it is pointed out that the Prius is about as "Green" as a V8 Pick-Up because of the manufacturing process and a Mercedez S Class is more environmentally friendly with a V10?

I am not seeing any threat to my ability to get bread at Whole Foods (Which I believe has organic crack in it). It just assaults that sense that one is doing something better or best than anyone else, for a myriad of reasons. As Jay Leno said of the Prius Americans like to shout out that they are "sacrificing" to save the world.

KingGorilla wrote:
Why am I reading this the same way when it is pointed out that the Prius is about as "Green" as a V8 Pick-Up because of the manufacturing process and a Mercedez S Class is more environmentally friendly with a V10?

I would like to see that comparison if you have a link. How people calculate the environmental footprint is something that can be pretty interesting.

There was the "Dust to Dust" Study.

http://www.impactlab.net/2007/03/14/...

Basically because so much of the Prius is mined, built, cast in China and Taiwan and shipped so far, it has a higher impact. Mercedez won an award by focussing more of their process within Bavaria to cut down on much of this.

Nosferatu wrote:
What does Japan require to be considered organic? I'm fairly certain there is no hand planting requirement to be labelled organic here in the United States. Or is that just an issue in rice farming?

Didn't mean to imply that organic here means "hand planted." It doesn't. That's just the way we do it (the particular method we use).

Not exactly sure on the government requirements for organic here. My Japanese isn't good enough to wade through government documents and paperwork for that kind of thing. My boss is in charge of that and we're kinda "working on it." But I remember a while ago him saying that one of the requirements for you to be certified organic is that there should not be a non-organic farm within 20km of your farm. This makes no sense to me, especially if you know anything about Japan. Pretty much all available land (read: flat, not mountain) is given over to either rice fields or living spaces. I can't imagine there's a farm-able place in Japan that is separated by 20km from another rice field.

Anyway, we tend to sell our organic stuff to private customers. These are folks we know and who know how we take care of our rice. They seem satisfied with our organic stuff.

Mark Bittman of the NYT has essentially apologized for writing about the Standford study.

The Stanford study was not only an exercise in misdirection, it was a headline generator. By providing “useful” and “counterintuitive” information about organic food, it played right into the hands of the news hungry while conveniently obscuring important features of organic agriculture.

He noted that the study narrowly defined nutritious as only containing more vitamins (something other studies have shown for organic foods) and essentially ignored the negative health impacts of exposure to pesticides and even antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in non-organic foods.

It also doesn't help that the food giant Cargill is a major funder of Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, the group that did the study.

Yep, organic milk really is better for you than regular milk. [NBC]

Organic milk contains more heart-healthy fatty acids than regular milk, says study author Charles Benbrook, a research professor at the Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources at Washington State University. The WSU researchers tested nearly 400 samples of organic and conventional milk over 18 months.
[...]
The reason organic milk is healthier comes down to its ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids, which is lower than in regular milk. A diet containing too many omega-6 fatty acids and not enough omega-3s has been linked to heart disease, as well as cancer, inflammation and autoimmune diseases. That’s because your gut converts omega-6s to arachidonic acid, which can cause inflammation. But the anti-inflammatory powers of omega-3s help to counterbalance that reaction, which is why keeping that ratio low is so important. (An omega-6 to omega-3 ratio of 2.3 to 1 is best for heart health, research suggests.)

There is more at the NBC article and here is a direct link to the paper.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...

Except it's not necessarily because it's organic, but because organically raised cows tend to have more grass in their diet.

garion333 wrote:
Except it's not necessarily because it's organic, but because organically raised cows tend to have more grass in their diet.

Yeah, it's previously been observed that the ratio of grain to grass in cows' diets has marked effects on the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids they produce.