The Big Board-Gaming Catch-All

Fedaykin98 wrote:

The online game of five players I played was less than 3 hours, including a longer-than-necessary rules teach. The IRL game of four players might have been two and a half hours or so. Looks like I'm playing it again this weekend, so I'll let you know what the run time is.

I definitely understand the idea that the game's complexity doesn't scream three hours, but my group had fun the whole time. You could definitely just pick a lower number of points to play to, as some games like Xia explicitly endorse.

I do think you need the full ten point game to experience satisfying changes to your deck.

Coming back to this, as promised. I played Moonrakers again this weekend with four players. It took just over two hours with one new player. I tried to keep the rules teach to a minimum.

Something I've been feeling more and more is that long rules teaches for games just take a ton of time, destroy any momentum, and most of that information won't be retained anyway. There may be games that are super complex and a lot needs to be taught up front, but as much as possible, I think just explaining the concept and the goal in a couple sentences and then giving some example turns (possibly live turns) will do a better job, and much faster. Moonrakers helps this by leveraging the deckbuilder mechanics, which most hobby gamers are familiar with these days.

For example, this weekend I just picked the first player in such a way as to make the new player go last. That way, he saw three turns happen before he had to take one (although in Moonrakers, you can participate in any given turn, since you could come along on their mission).

Hopefully my mission to speed up teaches as much as possible is good for all players, and not just myself. For me, I'm not a big auditory learner. Especially with boardgames, I seem to be a more kinesthetic learner, where actually doing the thing helps me understand it. Usually my goal with playing a game for the first time is just to take legal turns and not make a fool of myself, rather than to win.

Back to Moonrakers - there were a couple potential bummers about this session. For one, my friend who was hosting felt halfway through like he had made poor buying decisions in terms of ship parts and crew, and decided that he just couldn't compete with the rest of us. He started just staying at base every turn, getting a credit and a new objective card. The other is that I led the entire way and the other players didn't seem to try too hard to stop me. In the end, one of my friends invited me on a mission and I was able to fulfill my two objective cards, slingshotting myself to ten points and the win. I think the other players needed to have been more vocal about shutting me out of any advancement during others' turns. I'll stress that next time.

I do still think it's a fun game, and the journey is more important than the destination - I actually think I care more about winning party games than this particular game, but it's still a fun way to spend a couple hours with friends.

Hey all, they are going to launch the Gamefound campaign for the next Tainted Grail game soon, but if you follow the campaign before launch, you get some small add-on for free.

The group I've been playing The Crew: The Quest for Planet Nine with finished the final mission on Saturday night! Yay, us!

We're probably going to go through the Deep Sea one now

MikeSands wrote:

The group I've been playing The Crew: The Quest for Planet Nine with finished the final mission on Saturday night! Yay, us!

We're probably going to go through the Deep Sea one now :D

Nice! I love these games. Deep Sea is superior in my opinion. Hope you enjoy it!

Orphu wrote:

Nice! I love these games. Deep Sea is superior in my opinion. Hope you enjoy it!

Yep, the variety from the task deck looks like a distinct improvement.

Bee and Puppycat is adorable.

Whoops. Wrong section. I stand by my netflix recommendation, though.

I have played a few more games of Mirroring of Mary King and its turning into one of my favorite 2 player games. Very deep and lots of strategy in those cards. Highly recommended.

I saw this on the boardgame subreddit this morning and thought it was a great question:

I didn't have a *clue* what I was missing out on until I played ________. What game absolutely blew your mind the first time you played it and still exites you to this day?
And, why?

For me it's Carcassonne. Until then, the only board games I'd ever played were things like Risk, Monopoly, and Clue. I had ZERO clue that there was this amazing world of non-Parker Brothers games out there. Especially ones that were fun to play.

Carcassonne was my gateway game to the bigger world of board games out there and I still love to play it.

Trachalio wrote:

Carcassonne was my gateway game to the bigger world of board games out there and I still love to play it.

Carcassonne was ours, too. We dropped into the FLGS back in 2002, neither of us having any exposure to any modern board game. I'm not even sure why we were there. Probably just a poor, young (har har, we were 33/34) couple looking for something to do. We saw people playing Magic and other card games so watched that a bit. Then the owner came up and asked if he could help us. We told him we hadn't been in a game shop before so he recommended some games and pulled out a copy of Carcassonne and taught us. Mind Blown.

That was The Beginning! Now, I don't allow myself to buy any new games because of all the ones we have.

That game shop went under a few years later, which was quite sad. Todd, the owner, was such a nice guy.

-BEP

Hm, interesting question. Probably Pandemic for me.

I'm mostly interested in rpgs, but as board games are adjacent I've always been somewhat aware of what's out there.

However, Pandemic's exciting and cooperative gameplay is something that I'd never come across before. Ever since, I generally prefer cooperative games to competitive—I've always been about games as social first, with winning and competition quite a lot less important.

I've noticed that as my board game group gets older we've been gravitating to more co-oporative games than competitive ones. Not all the time mind you, but it's a nice change of pace from always trying to destroy everyone

Between little kids, a bad commute, covid, and general social anxiety, I haven't been much of a board gamer for years now. I've also been good about limiting myself to one or two purchases per year, because it's not like they'll get played anyway.

But oops, I bought a bunch of stuff this week. It's probably some combination of retail therapy to combat a depression cycle, and the oldest kid starting to hit the point where he can focus on a game long enough to actually play. Plus, Amazon has been having a ridiculous sale where they're applying a hefty discount and then offering an additional coupon discount on top, and I wound up finding a bunch of stuff for really low prices. So over the last week or so, I got:

Pandemic Legacy Season 0 - $40 - I seem to collect legacy games that I'll totally get around to playing one day. This one's been on my list for a while, but it never seems to go on sale. This is the cheapest I've ever seen it, so I jumped.
The Initiative - $38- SUSD said this would probably be good with kids, and it looked interesting, so...
Spirit Island $40
Zombie Kidz Evolution $17 - I think this got recommended in this thread as good for kids.
Rear Window $17 - At first I thought this was the weirdest license to turn into a board game, but then I read about it, and turns out it's actually a maybe better version of Mysterium? For $17, I took a flyer.

And I didn't buy it this week, but tomorrow, I'm also getting a big box of all the Final Girl Season 1 stuff. At least that's solo, so it's more likely to get played!

I think I've mentioned it before, but for me it was Blokus probably 15+ years ago now. Not because I played it but because I was at work and I was watching a group of people playing it. I was curious what it was, so looked it up, and of course that led me to Boardgamegeek for the first time.. and thus was the beginning of the rabbithole. I did end up buying it, but I would say the true gateway game for me would have been Ticket to Ride, based off of my reading of Board Game Geek way back then.

Ticket to Ride. I lived with two other guys at the time, and that was all we did for about three solid weeks.

I'm trying to remember what my gateway drug was. I'm pretty sure it's one of the following:

Carcassonne, the XBLA game. Even though I've never actually played it in physical board form, I think I vastly prefer the videogame implementation of it for all of the automation and conveniences. I used to play it while my infant napped on my chest, sometimes even while holding her bottle with one hand.

Apples to Apples & Telestrations. Different games, yes, but they have a few things in common: 1) They're both suitable for many people to play, in a party situation; and 2) I was introduced to both of them at the same time: Dr_Awkward and Missy's legendary inaugural house party. I eventually bought both of these games to play with my family.

Risk Legacy. I played this at the second (or third?) PAX East, which was the first PAX East with a huge GWJ contingent. We had taken over 2 or 3 big round tables, GWJ signage, and tons of lovely Goodjers to play all sorts of games with. Actually I've recently been looking to pick up a new box of this to introduce to my family, now that we've gone through a few other Legacy/Legacy-style games.

All of the above said, I think the first modern / non-mass market board game I actually purchased was Dominion, despite having never played it before. I still remain impressed at how tight that gameplay and card interaction is tuned.

For me, Talisman. Loved the theme and really getting into "character" and all the expansions. That game got me started on the collector aspect of the hobby and whoo boy did that ever take off!

Talisman....great memories of that one with all the expansions way back in the day.

Hero Quest (and to a lesser extent, Space Crusade). I feel like it would not have aged well if I went back to it now, but it really captured my imagination as a kid.

Blood Bowl tabletop. My favorite GW game as a kid. Have returned to it in a big way in the last year, local league, national tournaments and all sorts.

Euro wise. I can't get enough of Brass (edit Birmingham). Day 3 of a convention back in spring I was very tired and walked away early at the beginning of a teach because I knew none of it was going to go into my brain in that state. My friend continued learning it and enjoyed so much he bought a copy immediately. He taught our regular game group and I absolutely loved it. We are playing it again this evening, fifth time in maybe 6 months. We've got plenty of other games to choose from but we keep coming back to it. So moreish! For me it's become my comfort middling to heavy euro.

Played a couple of games in my weekly Tuesday night gaming group:

Oath: Our second game of Oath after a year+ of having it sitting on the shelf. It's really not for my group. I can see that it can be great and it can be an amazing story generator, but you need a group that is cut throat and very back stabby for it to work well. My group is just too nice. We just kinda meandered along until someone won. One of us was ready to nope out after two rounds. Not a good fit for us. So I guess I have a copy of Oath to sell?

Tokyo Highway: I was lucky enough to find a copy of the original Itten game with the wooden bits and it's infuriating how easy those little wooden bits slide around. Infuriating for the active player and hilarious for the people watching. Very quickly became a favorite of ours.

Cat in the Box: We tried this right after I picked it up at gencon and we realized that the rules of the game has a paradox in it (which is fitting I guess?), but with a slight house rule in place it's a great little trick taking game with several "oh god, yes, you paradox'd out right before I had to!!" with lots of laughter. Great little game.

We have also played multiple games of Too Many Bones hoping it would be something we could sink multiple plays into, but all of us found it to be a bit too same-y with no real change to it from game to game even with using other bosses. I know there is a expansion that allows you turn it into a legacy game, but I am not sure it would help it. One of players in the group said "it feels like a solo game that they tacked more players on to" which I think hits the nail on the head.

Also very, very, excited about Queens Dilemma. We had an amazing time with King's Dilemma and really look forward to this one: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/horribleguild/the-queens-dilemma

Bubblefuzz wrote:

Blood Bowl tabletop. My favorite GW game as a kid. Have returned to it in a big way in the last year, local league, national tournaments and all sorts.

Wait, really? You're playing in person with models? What is it now, 4th Edition?

Bubblefuzz wrote:

Euro wise. I can't get enough of Brass (edit Birmingham). Day 3 of a convention back in spring I was very tired and walked away early at the beginning of a teach because I knew none of it was going to go into my brain in that state. My friend continued learning it and enjoyed so much he bought a copy immediately. He taught our regular game group and I absolutely loved it. We are playing it again this evening, fifth time in maybe 6 months. We've got plenty of other games to choose from but we keep coming back to it. So moreish! For me it's become my comfort middling to heavy euro.

You're reminding me that I need to play this again. I wish it was on BGA.

Fredrik_S wrote:

Cat in the Box: We tried this right after I picked it up at gencon and we realized that the rules of the game has a paradox in it (which is fitting I guess?), but with a slight house rule in place it's a great little trick taking game with several "oh god, yes, you paradox'd out right before I had to!!" with lots of laughter. Great little game.

Ok, I'm curious - what's the rule paradox, and what's the house rule?

Boudreaux wrote:
Fredrik_S wrote:

Cat in the Box: We tried this right after I picked it up at gencon and we realized that the rules of the game has a paradox in it (which is fitting I guess?), but with a slight house rule in place it's a great little trick taking game with several "oh god, yes, you paradox'd out right before I had to!!" with lots of laughter. Great little game.

Ok, I'm curious - what's the rule paradox, and what's the house rule?

The rule paradox is that the numbers of a color can be completely filled out but players may still have that color as an option. For example; A player can play red (for example) because their science board says red is still an option, but they cant play red (because all the number slots are taken). So a player can choose to paradox out the game. But the rules say you cant choose to paradox out willingly.

Our house rule says that once all the number slots are filled out, we share the research and ALL players remove the filled out color from their science boards.

Natus wrote:
Bubblefuzz wrote:

Blood Bowl tabletop. My favorite GW game as a kid. Have returned to it in a big way in the last year, local league, national tournaments and all sorts.

Wait, really? You're playing in person with models? What is it now, 4th Edition?

Bubblefuzz wrote:

Euro wise. I can't get enough of Brass (edit Birmingham). Day 3 of a convention back in spring I was very tired and walked away early at the beginning of a teach because I knew none of it was going to go into my brain in that state. My friend continued learning it and enjoyed so much he bought a copy immediately. He taught our regular game group and I absolutely loved it. We are playing it again this evening, fifth time in maybe 6 months. We've got plenty of other games to choose from but we keep coming back to it. So moreish! For me it's become my comfort middling to heavy euro.

You're reminding me that I need to play this again. I wish it was on BGA.

Yep really in person and on the table, it's great and enjoying it lots, tabletop minis game of choice by far. Travelling for a 40 coach tournament in about a week.

Officially GW rebooted it in 2016 which would have been their 4th edition of the game. Since though they have released "season 2" in 2020 aka 5th edition. Main change I guess is addition of a passing attribute for which only thrower positionals have a decent stat. So no 2+ throwing from everyone on agility teams like elves. There have been plenty of other tweaks and pretty well supported by GW, regular new team releases.

Brass is so good. Even though my git of a friend really did a number on me in the game last week, stuffing up my early game plans from which I couldn't really recover and compete. When someone asks "how evil are we allowed to be exactly?" before they make a move you know it's going to be bad. To be fair we all approved full evil and I still loved it... though I will get my revenge in Brass or another game.

Fredrik_S wrote:

The rule paradox is that the numbers of a color can be completely filled out but players may still have that color as an option. For example; A player can play red (for example) because their science board says red is still an option, but they cant play red (because all the number slots are taken). So a player can choose to paradox out the game. But the rules say you cant choose to paradox out willingly.

Our house rule says that once all the number slots are filled out, we share the research and ALL players remove the filled out color from their science boards.

Ah, gotcha - yeah we ran into situations where people *wanted* to paradox but we thought the "can't do it intentionally" rule covered pretty much everything. For example, someone leading with blue and a later player having a matching and available number wanting to say they were out of blue, and only had red/yellow which were NOT available, thus paradox.

Of course we somehow missed the rule that you only score from the board positions when you also get your trick bid correct, so our first many games were already really screwed up.

'War of the Ring' (2nd Edition). I have to mention this is one of the most complex games with allot of rules, but beautifully comes together for one of the most thematic games of this scale I've ever tried. Check out Boardgame Geek and you'll see it's number 2 all..ALL time strategy game. How the designers made sooo many different aspects work is amazing.

Donan wrote:

allot

verb
give or apportion (something) to someone as a share or task.
"equal time was allotted to each"

What you want is "a lot", a two-word phrase.

As in, "he allotted a lot of lots to Lot."

-BEP

ps. you're welcome.

Nonetheless, an awesome, if complicated and time consuming, game.

I finally had a chance to crack open Return to Dark Tower and play the inaugural game with my family. None of us had ever played the original, so we kinda had no nostalgia or foreknowledge to rely on. We didn’t watch the tutorial video, and just kinda waded in. We spent a decent amount of time reading the rules during the course of play, which slowed things down, bit we eventually got onto a pretty good roll. Sadly, we ended up losing the game in month 4, at just past the 2-hour mark.

Finally got to table up Twilight Imperium 4 (vanilla, no expansions). Picked it up at release and life just hasn't allowed for it to happen. I'm an avid fan of Twilight Imperium 3 and was really looking forward to giving this a go!

Ended up doing a three player game last night and it was awesome. Took around 7 hours but none of us had played 4th edition before and I was the only one who had played any Twilight Imperium before.

We had the Xxcha Kingdom, Embers of Muaat and Tssaril Tribes duking it out for galactic dominance. It was a pretty standard slow start with everyone staking their claims. One of the early objectives was to claim two systems adjacent to Mecatol Rex so that got us pulled toward the center pretty quickly. I was in a position to claim Mecatol but was really on the fence about moving in with Muaat having both of their war suns within rage. Thankfully I was able to delay enough to get them to activate the war suns, freeing me up to move into Mecatol Rex.

It was a pretty bold move and set the tone for the rest of the game. Thankfully my Transit Diodes with the assistance of a really handy action card (put a ground troop on each planet you control) allowed me to keep funneling troops into Mecatol while Muaat attempted to wrestle control of the system. Muaat and Tssaril made some really savvy deals to coordinate against me but my political control over Mecatol allowed me to enforce some key directives and laws (including shutting down the wormholes for a round) that helped me hang on long enough to seal the victory just as Muaat and Tssaril were starting to punch through to my home system. Had the game lasted one more round it would've been a very different picture as both were prepped to gain some major points.

Fourth edition is awesome. Really feels like they took the good parts of 3rd edition with its expansions (at least as best I can remember) and made a few tweaks to make for a solid game. In particular I enjoyed the promissory notes that both help give focus to negotiations as well as provide a built-in mechanism for long standing binding agreements.

Everyone had a blast! It's a long, epic game for sure but for a game of this length you are engaged the entire time. There's so much to think about and plan in advance but you are also actively engaged in what everyone else is doing because each move can have potentially sweeping effects on the state of the game. There's really little else like Twilight Imperium.... if you can manage the time to play it.