New mouse help...

Since the other thread wasn't getting any attention I thought I'd start a new one. I thought recycling an old thread would have been best but I guess not?

Okay, just discovered that I'm suffering from this: Mouse is double clicking when being used or not clicking at all. It's an old wireless MS mouse that's served me well over the years (so much so that the "cushioning" gel on the sides has been worn away through use!).

Now, I'm a bit limited with what I can buy due to importing being an issue plus I don't really like the look of this RAT stuff (I especially don't like the lack of a button(s) on the right side of the mouse - I find that in games that really need more mouse buttons, sticking them all on the same thumb/finger isn't very productive).

The best mouse I ever used was a Logitech MX310 for durability and personal hand comfort. However, nothing they've released since has really impressed me - though I have just discovered that they have a G300 so if anyone has any impressions or thoughts on that let me know as I *might* be able to import it from the UK via Amazon.

Other than that I'm pretty open to suggestions from the Goodjer hivemind. Here are my requirements:

- Wired (with a long cable. I'm fed up dealing with batteries and connection issues!!)
- Ambidextrous (or at least not curved radically to one side for right-handers only [even though I am primarily right-handed!!])
- At least 4 buttons (not including scroll wheel button because using that as a button is just daft! )

Any thoughts?

I have a G500 that I really like. But if you're keen on the G300, I'd say go for it as you seem to want buttons spread out and ambidextrous.

AnimeJ wrote:

I have a G500 that I really like. But if you're keen on the G300, I'd say go for it as you seem to want buttons spread out and ambidextrous.

Yeah, it's not perfect though as I would like those extra buttons to be on the side of the device so my thumb and little finger can use them rather than having to stretch my already used primary two fingers...

Razer Deathadder? It's very lightly contoured, but not nearly as much as the more popular logitech models, has four buttons (two main, two thumb), and is generally regarded as the best overall (ie: smooth, accurate, etc) optical sensor on the market.

If you don't want silly lights, they have the black edition.

I have a G400, G500, a CM Storm Spawn, and several other mice around the house including an older MX518 that still works perfectly.

I like the Spawn a lot for specific kinds of games, but always find myself gravitating back toward the Deathadder.

I remembered seeing this recently on one of my RSS feeds:
http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/06/r...

Looks like it might be suitable, but I've mainly used Logitech gaming mice, so I don't have any personal experience with Razer.

I also use a G500, and really enjoy how comfortable it is. The only thing I would suggest if you are going to do all your gaming with right hand, it might be best to be get a dedicated mouse for playing and swap out mice as you need? I think the ergonomics for a specific handed mouse are quite a bonus.

magicjoef wrote:

I remembered seeing this recently on one of my RSS feeds:
http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/06/r...

Looks like it might be suitable, but I've mainly used Logitech gaming mice, so I don't have any personal experience with Razer.

I also use a G500, and really enjoy how comfortable it is. The only thing I would suggest if you are going to do all your gaming with right hand, it might be best to be get a dedicated mouse for playing and swap out mice as you need? I think the ergonomics for a specific handed mouse are quite a bonus.

Thanks for that, actually I saw that as I was browsing ThinJ's link. The Taipan looks like it might be right up my alley.

As for the ergonomics of specific-handed mice I've always been less comfortable with them as they tend to make my wrist bend in an unnatural way and it ends up giving me aches and pains. Never had that problem with an ambidextrous mouse - maybe it's my grip style... Not to mention that they always put all the buttons on the same side for your thumb to use.

Now I need to have a think on whether the G300 or the Taipan is better for my needs.

[edit] *2 seconds later*

Who am I kidding? The button placement on the Razor mouse is far superior.

You may have already made up your mind, but as someone who has extensively used both the 300mx and the G300, I wanted to give you my two cents worth.

These mice feel very different. The G300 feels narrower and taller. It's an agile, light mouse that is great for finger grip. For me the most natural way to maneuver it is with my pinky and thumb, leaving my middle fingers to control the oddly placed top buttons (which you get used to).

I like the mouse, especially for off-hand mousing, because it's narrow shape and pinching grip gives me more control with my lesser used hand. I can't say that it's the most comfortable mouse I've every used, but it will should feel quite a bit like the old wireless you are replacing.

Scroll wheel as a button is the best.

It's the tilt-wheel nonsense that is daft.

Hollowheel wrote:

You may have already made up your mind, but as someone who has extensively used both the 300mx and the G300, I wanted to give you my two cents worth.

These mice feel very different. The G300 feels narrower and taller. It's an agile, light mouse that is great for finger grip. For me the most natural way to maneuver it is with my pinky and thumb, leaving my middle fingers to control the oddly placed top buttons (which you get used to).

I like the mouse, especially for off-hand mousing, because it's narrow shape and pinching grip gives me more control with my lesser used hand. I can't say that it's the most comfortable mouse I've every used, but it will should feel quite a bit like the old wireless you are replacing.

Yeah, I tend to grip in the same way with my hand hovering above the mouse... I'll keep that in mind, thanks!

Quintin_Stone wrote:

It's the tilt-wheel nonsense that is daft.

I use tilt on my G500 for second and third item slots in BF3, and it works pretty great for that. Just bump to go to med pack or paddles for instance. Don't even have to remove the finger from firing or ADS as it's just a bit of sideways pressure.

The problem with the click down of the middle wheel is that it's too easy to accidentally trigger the tilt instead of the third button.

I'm another person who loves mouse wheel as click(It's my go to PTT key), but I also like having the side click. I've found that on the G500 I can click it without accidentally going to one of the side clicks; it's a very well articulated button.

Any recommendations for a light mouse that doesn't have those damn glued-on mouse feet? I have a Logitech mouse that I like, but the pads have started to slip off (the mouse is about three years old), and I'd like to find one that doesn't use them. Maybe one with built in glass/teflon-coated hemispheres? I love a light mouse; the less resistance, the better. in fact, I wouldn't mind going back to a wired mouse if it meant a super-light traditional-bodied mouse.

Puce, Logitech redesigned the Mx518 (and possibly other mice) to replace the stupid little feet with these big ole gliding areas instead.

IMAGE(http://img4.abload.de/img/logiybu.jpg)

It's possible that your favorite mouse was redesigned too.

Well, I finally got a new mouse! Unfortunately, I didn't get the Taipan because it was going to be a pain (and expensive!) to import so I just went with one of the simpler Razer mice that was being locally sold: The Abyssus.

I really like the quality and feel of the finish and while I haven't been messing around with it much yet I'm pretty happy with the product. I don't have the side buttons as I'd have preferred but I didn't have them on my old mouse anyway so that's no big loss since I managed without... it's just nice to have the option.

Mouse Grip Reflections:

I've never had any of the problems people report from using mice for a long time, and I'm easily capable of 18 hour marathons for days on end. My blood glucose level and sleep requirements trump any fatigue I get from using mice. Never thought about it.

Hollowheel's comment caused me to examine how I used mice.

It turns out I don't grip mice at all. I rest my hand on the mouse with the chief contact being the lower joint segments of the middle and pointer fingers, and the upper fleshy portion of the hand at that spot. It is no more stressful than resting your hand on any curved surface. The relaxed weight of the hand is sufficient to hold the mouse to itself and move it when I move my hand in any direction. Pointer and middle fingers are over left and right mouse buttons, lightly relaxed, with the relaxed weight very lightly compressing the buttons. Only slight effort is necessary to effect a button click.

Mouse manipulation is effected through whole-arm movement. The wrist is held motionless and braced so that the hand moves as one with the arm. Essentially, I move my mouse mainly with my shoulder muscles and pecs, and occasionally using elbow movement. The wrist is perfectly still.

Just sharing. I have never reflected on my mouse habits in this detail before. Might be useful to someone.

I was sitting here reading that, and thinking, "how on earth do you do that without holding your entire arm up for hours on end?" so I tried it. Definitely a better way of doing things.

There's always been a lot of talk about mouse grip styles. Claw, palm, finger tip, etc.

EDIT: Quick search and I found a Razer page on some of the styles.

I'm closest to finger tip. And I'm a medium to high sensitivity player.

Ergonomically speaking, it sounds like LarryC's mousing style is perfect-- likely one reason he's never complained of discomfort. As someone suffering from shoulder pain (I'm a designer and work on computers all day), I'd recommend that everyone mimic it if possible. Alas, I find it difficult to be accurate without resorting to my finger-tip grip. (Sadface).

Puce Moose wrote:

Any recommendations for a light mouse that doesn't have those damn glued-on mouse feet? I have a Logitech mouse that I like, but the pads have started to slip off (the mouse is about three years old), and I'd like to find one that doesn't use them. Maybe one with built in glass/teflon-coated hemispheres? I love a light mouse; the less resistance, the better. in fact, I wouldn't mind going back to a wired mouse if it meant a super-light traditional-bodied mouse.

The mouse feet on the G500 I keep with my laptop started to wear down, so I bought some PTFE tape from C4 Ngen. It's like a brand new mouse and the tape is much cheaper than actual replacements for the feet themselves.

It worked so well I bought some of the extra thick mouse feet discs and the tape for the bottom of my Deathadder too, and that glides easier now than it ever did. And I don't even use one of their mousepads. I'm using them with my Steelseries SX pad.

They've been on there for months and don't really show any signs of wear.

This is the most recent general mouse thread, so I figured I'd post this here.

My MX518 was getting tired, after about four years, and starting to miss clicks, so I replaced it with a G400. I can confirm that it's almost an exact replacement; the size, shape, and layout are all identical. The feel is very good, and they've added a new resolution mode that's twice what the MX518 had. Oh, and it supports 1000Hz polling with no trouble, if you're a believer that it can matter. (I definitely am, but you have to be wired insanely fast.... in my mid-20s, it might have mattered, in my mid-40s, not a whit.) Nifty mouse.

Plus, they got rid of that stupid faux-dented-metal look... the G400 is just nice, basic black. I like it much better.

If it's not the most perfect mouse ever made, I'm not sure what is. For my grip and usage, it is absolutely ideal in most respects. My sole complaint remains that the two thumb buttons are a little awkward to reach, so I don't use them very much.

I went from the MX518 to the G5 then the G500. It's very similar in shape, but it gave me a third thumb button (which I love, even though I have to map it to key binds for most games).

Malor wrote:

My MX518 was getting tired, after about four years, and starting to miss clicks, so I replaced it with a G400. I can confirm that it's almost an exact replacement; the size, shape, and layout are all identical. The feel is very good, and they've added a new resolution mode that's twice what the MX518 had.

(...)
Plus, they got rid of that stupid faux-dented-metal look... the G400 is just nice, basic black. I like it much better.

Yep. I'm using a G400 now as well.

When it comes to gaming mice, this should be considered the default choice, IMO. Like the stock controller for a game console. There are other awesome mice, of course, but given its price and a design that suits a wide audience, I think the G400 is what you buy unless you really care a lot about mice and know that you would prefer a different product.

Malor wrote:

I was reading somewhere that the G500 has notable sensor and acceleration issues, which apparently the G400 lacks. It may actually be a better choice for the mouse-obsessed than its bigger brother and/or brothers.

I think that has to do with if you run it at high DPI. Especially at interpolation settings that aren't native for the sensor.

I've not seen anything specific to the G500.

Generally 800 DPI is fine I've found.

Malor wrote:

Even if you DO care a lot about mice, the G400 is a truly, truly excellent choice. It's not a thing you shrug and buy because you can't be arsed to shop, it's something to buy because it's such an outstanding offering.

That's basically what I said. I'm not saying you don't care about mice if you buy the G400, but simply that if you're buying anything else, it's because you know what you're looking for.

If you don't know, then just buy the G400. My point is that it should pretty much be the "stock" gaming mouse, and if you choose something else, it's because of a deliberate, informed decision.

And, yes, plenty of people know their mice and prefer the G400, because it's awesome. As I said, I am in that group.

So though I love the Mx518, it seems to have a consistent problem that I suspect is a design flaw. It's happened to the three Mx518s I've owned, even an older Mx510. And that is that the mousewheel will sometimes get into a state where it will register a line up/down between the clicks instead of at them. Probably doesn't bother most people, but I personally find it very irksome when it happens.

Wondering if the G400 has anything like that problem.

Even if you DO care a lot about mice, the G400 is a truly, truly excellent choice. It's not a thing you shrug and buy because you can't be arsed to shop, it's something to buy because it's such an outstanding offering.

I was reading somewhere that the G500 has notable sensor and acceleration issues, which apparently the G400 lacks. It may actually be a better choice for the mouse-obsessed than its bigger brother(s).

Hmm, well, it feels exactly the same to me, just newer, so the detents are a little stronger. I'm just guessing, but I suspect if you have such a common problem across 518s, you'll probably have it in the 400, too.

MannishBoy wrote:

I went from the MX518 to the G5 then the G500. It's very similar in shape, but it gave me a third thumb button (which I love, even though I have to map it to key binds for most games).

I went through the same progression, and have the same opinion. At this point I'm completely dependent on the extra button in a few games. And though they seemed like gimmicks at first, I love the free-spinning scroll wheel and the ability to load the mouse up and make it as heavy as possible.

MannishBoy wrote:
Malor wrote:

I was reading somewhere that the G500 has notable sensor and acceleration issues, which apparently the G400 lacks. It may actually be a better choice for the mouse-obsessed than its bigger brother and/or brothers.

I think that has to do with if you run it at high DPI. Especially at interpolation settings that aren't native for the sensor.

I've not seen anything specific to the G500.

Generally 800 DPI is fine I've found.

That's news to me. I've had no issues using it configured at ~3500 DPI since I took it out of the box several years ago.

List of currently available mice with no known unfixable sensor issues:

G400 (But only with a PID of LZ13333 or higher. Any number lower than that (My G400 is LZ12133...) and you have angle snapping built into the sensor that can't be disabled.
Razer Deathadder (All currently available versions/revisions)
CM Storm Spawn (Angle Snapping option available in drivers, completely disables)

All laser mice, like the G500 and many others, tend to have a variety of different problems depending on what surface they're being used on. The G500 for instance, can have either positive or negative acceleration all depending just on what surface it's being used on.

The only mice to ever be tested clear of both acceleration issues and angle snapping are all optical sensors.

There are laser mice with no angle snapping or an option to disable it (like the G9 and G9x) but they all have acceleration of one form or another.

psoplayer wrote:
MannishBoy wrote:

I went from the MX518 to the G5 then the G500. It's very similar in shape, but it gave me a third thumb button (which I love, even though I have to map it to key binds for most games).

I went through the same progression, and have the same opinion. At this point I'm completely dependent on the extra button in a few games. And though they seemed like gimmicks at first, I love the free-spinning scroll wheel and the ability to load the mouse up and make it as heavy as possible.

MannishBoy wrote:
Malor wrote:

I was reading somewhere that the G500 has notable sensor and acceleration issues, which apparently the G400 lacks. It may actually be a better choice for the mouse-obsessed than its bigger brother and/or brothers.

I think that has to do with if you run it at high DPI. Especially at interpolation settings that aren't native for the sensor.

I've not seen anything specific to the G500.

Generally 800 DPI is fine I've found.

That's news to me. I've had no issues using it configured at ~3500 DPI since I took it out of the box several years ago.

Whether angle snapping (also called prediction) or positive/negative acceleration are a problem for you is highly personal. It's just like anything else. If you can grow accustomed to the way a mouse behaves then it will work for you just fine. Some people can deal with angle snapping and acceleration and even like it.

Others can't stand it.

Angle snapping has grown to be a big annoyance for me personally so the only mice I use with my main rig all either don't have it or have the ability to disable it.

*lol. Just realized I never bothered to explain what angle snapping even is. Basically if you only move the mouse at a smallish angle when going side to side or up and down, the mouse interprets the movement as a straight line. The only way to make this effect clearly plain to a person who's never looked for it before is to side by side a mouse that has it versus one that doesn't. You end up with pictures like this:

IMAGE(http://i45.tinypic.com/2u7r2qc.jpg)

IMAGE(http://i46.tinypic.com/ru7fcj.png)

Quintin_Stone wrote:

So though I love the Mx518, it seems to have a consistent problem that I suspect is a design flaw. It's happened to the three Mx518s I've owned, even an older Mx510. And that is that the mousewheel will sometimes get into a state where it will register a line up/down between the clicks instead of at them. Probably doesn't bother most people, but I personally find it very irksome when it happens.

Wondering if the G400 has anything like that problem.

I had this on the MX310 I used to own as well. Wasn't too much of a problem but it basically resulted in a "double" scroll movement.

Thin_J wrote:

angle snapping

Interesting. I was not aware of such details in mice behavior. I must experiment and report back.