The Data Backup Thread (& request for more suggestions)

EvilDead wrote:

2. Sync select folders to my PC then have SOS back them up.
concerns: It would still bog down the wifi but not as much (one way wifi traffic). I'm also not sure of the best way or best program to do this. The built in program for the NAS only lets you do one folder which is kind of annoying.

I know Synctoy can do the sync pretty well, at least with Win 7. You could schedule it to run only at night.

Cool, thanks. Now that you mention it I remember you recommending that before for something else (Game saves?). Does that do two way synchronization?

I'm at 95% through with the RAID "data scrubbing" phase in setup so I will be able to give it a try soon. I'm not really sure what the data scrubbing is doing since it reformatted both of the HDs during setup anyways.

EvilDead wrote:

Cool, thanks. Now that you mention it I remember you recommending that before for something else (Game saves?). Does that do two way synchronization?

I'm at 95% through with the RAID "data scrubbing" phase in setup so I will be able to give it a try soon. I'm not really sure what the data scrubbing is doing since it reformatted both of the HDs during setup anyways.

It can be set up to favor either side of the sync or do two way. Might have to give preference to one side, can't remember.

I haven't used it in awhile. Used to use it to sync podcast folders.

We're looking for a fairly large solution for the office and found this to be reasonably priced:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...

Any thoughts on it or its reliability?

You should add backblaze to the list - they do unlimited backups for a flat rate:
http://www.backblaze.com/

Skimming the thread, 2 things:

1: Avoid Justcloud.com

2: I need to find a viable alternative for Dropbox, we're a small company and we rely on external collaborators for animation and post-production projects for advertisement and the like. these projects usually involve hefty amounts of data-transfer and usually the project is split between small teams of 2-4 persons each tackling a different piece of the project at the same time from different locations. Dropbox has worked quite well so far for us but the downside to it is that while ours is a paid account (100+ gb) our collaborators have personal, Free accounts with a storage limit on the low side. Whenever the complexity and data requirements of the project rises we go through a small hell trying to keep the team from filling their accounts and losing precious deadline time swapping data around.

So, we're trying "Box" it has some nice features and so far it has worked well, free accounts have a higher data limit, but the problem is that they only allow free accounts to upload files up to 250mb which is a big no-no for us. We're trying to determine whether you as a free user can bypass that uploading limit as long as you're uploading into a folder owned by a paid account. Still, entry level paid accounts have a 2gb cap per file and the premium service a 5gb cap. Neither of those alternatives seems business-wise for us.

Googledrive is also an alternative, but we're not confident enough on the security of the service, we're willing to explore a few alternatives first just in case.

So in short we need
-a paid cloud storage solution for collaborative projects, 100-200 gb storage is more than enough for our needs
-the ability to manage and create sub-accounts with no limitations on data storage
-or at least the ability to determine the data cap for each sub account, the ideal scenario would be for us to have 10-15 sub accounts with a storage limit of 15-20 gb each that I can assign to external collaborators)

Is there something out there that resembles this for a reasonable price? thanks in advance Goodjer Rat-king!
IMAGE(http://mattpagedotcom.com/art/files/2013/10/RatKing_New.jpg)

Edit: five days, not a single response or suggestion in the "tech and help" forum!
Seriously though, I'd appreciate any hint/pointers about the subject, after almost falling for the "justcloud" sucker trap I'm a bit hesitant of relying on tech review sites for guidance in this matter. Thanks in advance again!

I'd consider creating a new topic, as it's more about sharing than backups.

As for tips/advice: I got nuthin'

I don't have a specific recommendation for you, but I usually hit up http://alternativeto.net and http://softwarerecs.stackexchange.com when I'm looking for Software Recommendations. You can use your Stack Overflow login with the Software Recommendations site.

Good hunting!

Thanks for the suggestions True and Brave! I'm currently about to try Copy with a project, on paper seems to cover most of the bases. I'll let you know how it goes.

A friend asked for me to show her how to back up her laptop. I want to get her started on CrashPlan but she'll need external drive (or another computer) first for onsite backups. Any recommendations? Or just grab something at a good price with plenty of storage capacity?

McChuck wrote:

A friend asked for me to show her how to back up her laptop. I want to get her started on CrashPlan but she'll need external drive (or another computer) first for onsite backups. Any recommendations? Or just grab something at a good price with plenty of storage capacity?

Just grab anything from a reasonable manufacturer (WD, etc).

Also, not sure if you're aware, but the CrashPlan software can handle the backups to the external drive. So if the idea is for her to backup to a local external drive and to cloud backup too, you can use the same software for both. The CrashPlan software is free, it just won't let you backup to the CP cloud until you put in subscription details for the cloud service.

Yup, using CrashPlan for the backups to the external drive was the plan. And I'll see if I convince her to spend the money for a subscription.

I'm thinking I need to finally get cloud backup, and Crashplan looks like the one to get.

Any tips on WHAT to back up? Besides the obvious photos and music? Thanks!

Edit: Also, any suggestions for an external drive to back up to in my home, if I want to do both?

Edit 2: Lifehacker and Wirecutter both rate the WD MyBooks pretty highly. If I go that route (4 TB in this case), and reason to get McCloud instead? Looks like that has Ethernet connectivity; is that preferable to USB 3.0 if I'm planning to back up multiple computers on my network?

Fedaykin98 wrote:

I'm thinking I need to finally get cloud backup, and Crashplan looks like the one to get.

Any tips on WHAT to back up? Besides the obvious photos and music? Thanks!

Edit: Also, any suggestions for an external drive to back up to in my home, if I want to do both?

Edit 2: Lifehacker and Wirecutter both rate the WD MyBooks pretty highly. If I go that route (4 TB in this case), and reason to get McCloud instead? Looks like that has Ethernet connectivity; is that preferable to USB 3.0 if I'm planning to back up multiple computers on my network?

Game saves and installers/files for all your downloaded games. Especially the DRM free ones which should always have an immediate local copy made upon purchase. I also keep all my other game DL's backed up to reduce future bandwidth usage.

Don't forget any electronic bills / tax filings / documents.

I usually keep a folder of installers for the programs I use that don't install via ninite.com.

/not really an expert on this

Fedaykin98 wrote:

Any tips on WHAT to back up? Besides the obvious photos and music? Thanks!

I typically say: back up your user folder. (This is generally C:\Users\my-name in Windows systems, /Users/my-name in OS X, /home/my-name in Linux and other UNIXes).

Most everything that you would want to save will be in a sub-directory of this folder. You will back up some extra junk that you don't need, but mostly this will be configuration files and other small things which don't impact storage space very much, so they're not worth filtering out. You may want to exclude your Downloads folder, which tends to be larger and full of stuff you can just re-download if you ever need it again.

#1 priority is backing up anything irreplaceable: your personal documents, pictures, game saves, etc. Beyond that, it's just a question of convenience. If your music library is legal, you can likely re-download it from where you got it originally, but if you have the space, backing it up may be a nice convenience.

Edit 2: Lifehacker and Wirecutter both rate the WD MyBooks pretty highly. If I go that route (4 TB in this case), and reason to get McCloud instead? Looks like that has Ethernet connectivity; is that preferable to USB 3.0 if I'm planning to back up multiple computers on my network?

Yes, if you want to back up multiple computers to one drive, putting it on the network will be much more convenient than having to plug it into each device (or keep it plugged into one and have that one act as the "host" for all the other devices to access it through).

Although depending on your router, you may have the ability to plug it into your router's USB port and make it network available that way. But the Ethernet-enabled MyCloud will probably be more straightforward anyway.

FYI for those using Crashplan. They've got a pre-Black Friday deal for EXISTING customers going on right now for 50% off renewals for one or two years of the family plan. So $75 instead of $150/year.

I've not seen a lot of deals for existing customers.

Feeank wrote:

Thanks for the suggestions True and Brave! I'm currently about to try Copy with a project, on paper seems to cover most of the bases. I'll let you know how it goes.

Update: Wouldn't recommend for collaborative projects, we suffered several sinchronization issues during pressing times, the general feedback of everyone involved was that despite its promising features, the performance isn't up to par with Dropbox.

MannishBoy wrote:

FYI for those using Crashplan. They've got a pre-Black Friday deal for EXISTING customers going on right now for 50% off renewals for one or two years of the family plan. So $75 instead of $150/year.

I've not seen a lot of deals for existing customers.

It's great that a company will support existing customers with deals. So many focus only on new customers, not customer retention. I'll be following this setup soon to finally get local backup for all my household computers, using Crashplan as the agent across OS X, Windows, and Linux.

What's a good partition strategy for having a single 2TB WD MyBook connected on the network for backing up four computers? I would be using Crashplan on Windows 7, OS X Mavericks, and Linux. I'm tempted to use NTFS because Windows, but I have a sneaking suspicion that's suboptimal for OS X, in terms of data integrity. If any of the computers is of highest priority, it's probably the OS X machine, but not by much.

Will Crashplan create separate user/machine directories? Should I instead partition the 2TB drive to, say, five partitions sized how I anticipate we'll need them, with the fifth as a failsafe? That way I could use a filesystem appropriate for each OS.

But maybe I'm overcomplicating things.

So CrashPlan for Home is dead (after October 23, 2018). What alternatives do the Goodjer hivemind recommend? Code42 recommends Carbonite, but Backblaze looks better on every front.

I did a bunch of research last month and ended up signing up with Backblaze. Crashplan was the runner-up and I am glad I didn't go with them now.

I am running Backblaze on three computers for about 5TB total and so far so good. It is really painless to set up and it is pretty much invisible once it is running. I haven't noticed any connection / bandwidth problems and it has been totally stable for me across Windows 10 and OSX.

Here is a referral link if anyone is interested.

I think the best options are Crashplan for Small Business and Backblaze. The former is basically the exact same product as Crashplan for Home, but $10/mo instead of $5/mo, with the same client app styled blue instead of green. (And there are a few extra features, not of any great consequence though).

*Legion* wrote:

I think the best options are Crashplan for Small Business and Backblaze. The former is basically the exact same product as Crashplan for Home, but $10/mo instead of $5/mo, with the same client app styled blue instead of green. (And there are a few extra features, not of any great consequence though).

One other notable difference, Crashplan for Small Business will not allow you to use another computer as a secondary or local backup location. In fact, once you upgrade, they will delete the local backup if you had been using that feature under Crashplan for Home. May not be important to everyone, but was a pretty big deal for me. Luckily I was able to replicate the feature using Veeam to create the local backup.

Good heads-up on that, Teneman.

I'm glad this topic is here! I was just about to set up crashplan with a local backup option this week, when the news hit.

Is there another local backup service out there? The $0 cost of crashplan to do this was certainly attractive, but now that that's gone, are there any other automated, incremental offline backup tools out there? Backblaze looks good, and is priced right, but looks to only have cloud backup.

Veeam Endpoint Backup. Price is right, and does everything I need for local/offline. Entire computer, volume level, and file level are all possible, and restores are a snap.

Great will check it out!

Have not used Veeam, but I don't think I've heard anyone say anything but positive things about anything coming from Veeam.

Teneman wrote:

Veeam Endpoint Backup. Price is right, and does everything I need for local/offline. Entire computer, volume level, and file level are all possible, and restores are a snap.

Now named "Veeam Agent" since the latest release. Still free, still great. You can add a license to it now for server or workstation edition, but you don't need either to back up a standard PC to USB or network storage.

Another option that I saw recommended in the HNN thread about the announcement from Crashplan: Duplicati. It seems to cross-platform and supports lots of different back-ends, and seems to be fairly robust.

Veeam Agent seems like a good alternative for local attached backup, similar to what Crashplan for Home (Free) could do.