Stuck with a locked phone. What now?

Embarrassing story. I bought a purportedly unlocked phone from Amazon with the plan of using it in Taiwan. Only after I landed did I find out that the phone is sill locked. Thanks to the US's stringent battery shipping requirements, I was not able to send the phone back to Amazon within the specified period. So now I'm stuck with the phone.

Any ideas?

Call Amazon and explain it to them, they will probably let you return it anyway, especially since their product description was wrong.

Unlocked? As in, carrier agnostic? Because here in Malta and in the UK there are shops that provide that service for you (on virtually any phone) for €20.

What kind of phone is it? Perhaps the GWJ hive mind can find a way of unlocking without spending that £20.

It's an HTC Desire HD, spirder_j. I think I will give a call to a local shop tomorrow and see if they can do the unlock for me, like Duoae suggested. I'll have to resort to returning the phone past deadline if all else fails. Hopefully it won't come down to that.

Thanks to the US's stringent battery shipping requirements

The useless War on Terrorism, messing up people's lives one shipment at a time.

Malor wrote:
Thanks to the US's stringent battery shipping requirements

The useless War on Terrorism, messing up people's lives one shipment at a time.

Given that the changes were driven by the ICAO, I have a hard time buying this one.

Do you even read your own link?

[...]in consultation with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

[big snip]
These proposals are largely consistent with changes made to the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (UN Recommendations) and the International Civil Aviation Organization Technical Instructions on the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO Technical Instructions) and respond to recommendations issued by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).

In other words, all the rest of that alphabet soup is being driven by the US. The other agencies are just going along with our demands, not making the demands themselves.

Thanks, War on Terra!

Yes, I did. Clearly, however, you zeroed in on exactly what you felt supported your case best. So let's look at all of it, shall we?

75 FR 1302 - NPRM
Jan 11, 2010
PHMSA-2009-0095 (HM-224F); Transportation of Lithium Batteries, NPRM

SUMMARY: PHMSA, in consultation with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), is proposing to amend requirements in the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) on the transportation of lithium cells and batteries, including lithium cells and batteries packed with or contained in equipment. The proposed changes are intended to enhance safety by ensuring that all lithium batteries are designed to withstand normal transportation conditions. This would include provisions to ensure all lithium batteries are packaged to reduce the possibility of damage that could lead to a catastrophic incident, and minimize the consequences of an incident. In addition, lithium batteries would be accompanied by hazard communication that ensures appropriate and careful handling by air carrier personnel, including the flight crew, and informs both transport workers and emergency response personnel of actions to be taken in an emergency. These proposals are largely consistent with changes made to the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (UN Recommendations) and the International Civil Aviation Organization Technical Instructions on the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO Technical Instructions) and respond to recommendations issued by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).
View/Print Public Comments submitted to the Federal Document Management System from the link to the right. NOTE: search for comments using the entire FR number (for example "72 FR 71735"). Not all items will have submitted public comments.

UN, based on recommendations from ICAO. From there, you get NTSB and FAA.

P&C in Tech and Help. wth?

Malor wrote:
Thanks to the US's stringent battery shipping requirements

The useless War on Terrorism, messing up people's lives one shipment at a time.

Spoiler:

The disruption of normal life is the main objective of terrorists. In the US the terrorists won by a landslide due to overreaction.

Gumbie wrote:

P&C in Tech and Help. wth? :lol:

It's just a sign it's time to open a thread in P&C about the subject.
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In Israel all phones are unlocked - it's illegal to lock them. I guess Thirteenth should try the site Edwin posted.

Our gov't have done a few things to get the cellular market more competitive but there is still a little more work to be done.

Gumbie wrote:

P&C in Tech and Help. wth? :lol:

Here I was all excited for alternative solutions.