Steam - It's Not Just for Windows and Macs Anymore

I tried again a bit later on; it loaded much faster, and most of the jerkyness disappeared after I shut down Firefox and my probably 100+ tabs, so I think a lot of it just came down to having Firefox hog a bunch of CPU while I was trying to play. It was still occasionally jerky after that, but it settled down after a few minutes -- maybe the texture loading isn't yet ideal for older 512MB cards like mine.

Sparhawk wrote:

It does work though and I found that already pretty cool.
Today Valve announced that the beta has been expanded (by 5000 accounts I thought - checked it).
So things seem to go well :)

I was one of those new recruits. I'll be picking up a new 64gb SSD during the madness this weekend with the intent of actually seeing this through.

Cool psoplayer!

Well... I had planned on my month-old Samsung 830 series as my "good" SSD and just have a cheaper one with Ubuntu on it, but with holiday sales being what they were, I found an even better price on one of the new 840 series drives. Looks like Ubuntu will get the premiere drive after all.

Also, I noticed this in my Steam library over the weekend when logged in from my MacBook Air but was clueless why it was there until I found this today:

Steam for Linux Discussion Forum wrote:

Serious Sam 3: BFE is available for all Steam for Linux beta testers. It will be removed again when the beta is over.

More than I expected from being in the beta.

The 840 regular versions are actually slower than the 830s -- there's a more expensive 840 that comes closer to 830 speed, something like 840 pro or somesuch.

If you have a regular 840, your 830 is almost certainly going to be significantly faster.

I concur with this. I just bought an 830 and just using Samsung's utility, it's showing better benchmark results than the 840 did in lab tests. It cost around the same too but it's now out of production and it's getting VERY hard to find. I got one for $180 + shipping from B&H Photo Video. The thing's killer fast.

Hm, I guess I'll find out soon enough. I haven't been particularly impressed with my 830 so far. My computer already felt pretty fast just running off my old 1 TB from three years ago, and the installation of the SSD has introduced some annoyances. Aside from being uprooted from my comfort zone by making a fresh install of windows, it seems to have a 50/50 chance of hanging for ~15 sec during POST while trying to detect SATA devices. Also, (seemingly unrelated) I've had about five instances over the past month where almost every program simultaneously becomes unresponsive for around 10 sec before everything comes back to life, which feels like everything is just getting blocked by I/O ops that just don't happen for some reason.

I don't want to blame it on the 830 (it could also be symptoms of switching my old drive over to AHCI as well), but I definitely wasn't having any issues before. The firmware on the 830 is up to date, and I don't really know what else to try.

Ryan C Gordon interview: http://cheerfulghost.com/panickedthu...

And now we can also 'greenlight' games on Steam for Linux!

Malor wrote:

The 840 regular versions are actually slower than the 830s -- there's a more expensive 840 that comes closer to 830 speed, something like 840 pro or somesuch.

If you have a regular 840, your 830 is almost certainly going to be significantly faster.

It's a regular 840. I have no idea if Samsung's included benchmark utility is any good but...

IMAGE(http://i.imgur.com/dKafE.png)

Also no idea why it isn't reporting IOPS, but whatever. Time to find a thumb drive.

Edit: *sigh* Ubuntu decided to install itself to my 1TB games drive with no warning. Time to break out the partition recovery tools...

Not the games drive! Oh the humanity!

Steam for Linux Client Update
posted by Frank @ 05:18PM on November 29, 2012
We've just updated the Steam for Linux client. Your Steam client will update automatically
but if you wish to force the update, click Check for Steam Client Updates..., from the top-level Steam menu.

Here's the changelist for this release:
added libgl1-mesa-glx and libgl1-mesa-dri dependencies to the Steam package
fixed the minidump generator to upload properly versioned minidumps
initial bootstrap now generates minidumps
fixed window titles for the Gnome desktop
fixed overruns when drawing multi-line text
fixed crash that occured when downloading TF2
bootstrapper now continues execution even if UI can't be displayed
fixed numpad key symbol occurences when in Num Lock mode
fixed a common joystick crash

Two days later I have a working installation of Ubuntu, a brand new video card to replace the one that died in the process, a motherboard which I don't trust to continue working for much longer, and a profound sense of disappointment that it took me just as much trouble to enable proprietary video drivers as it did back on 6.06 when everything was terrible. Serious Sam is downloading. Recovery of the games drive is ongoing.

Not always a smooth riding psoplayer!

Finally I got the latest NVidia drivers to work with my videocard (laptop 330M), with the help of a forum.
Tried TF2 again. On lower settings it is playable. But I do die more often because of the lower frame rate.
Installing other games to see how that works. Have a good feeling about it!

I was able to install and play Serious Sam for a while with few issues. There's a known issue up front with launching the game, but other than that it looked and felt great. Having multiple monitors is a constant source of annoyance, as any newly created steam windows appear in the center of the whole desktop, right on the seam between my two monitors.

and a profound sense of disappointment that it took me just as much trouble to enable proprietary video drivers as it did back on 6.06 when everything was terrible.

Well, keep in mind that, on failing hardware, most software will look terrible.

Malor wrote:
and a profound sense of disappointment that it took me just as much trouble to enable proprietary video drivers as it did back on 6.06 when everything was terrible.

Well, keep in mind that, on failing hardware, most software will look terrible.

I didn't even have time to worry about video drivers until after I had sorted out all my hardware issues. Once I had my new 660 ti installed and the SSDs switched over to the main SATA2 plugs I ran a clean install. On my fresh desktop using the default driver (nouveau) starting Firefox would crash X server and send me back to the login screen. So I try using the regular method of installing the proprietary drivers, but that just made the X server crash whenever I logged in. So I switch over to TTY1 and play with things for a while and eventually do enough google searches on my phone to get things working. (You'd think that if I needed a compiler and kernel headers to install a video driver they would be installed automatically instead of just breaking everything.)

Ouch! If you have the time, open a bug report. That's really shoddy, in this day and age.

When I installed the 310 drivers, I had a hard lockup that I had to reset-button out of. It might not have been a full crash, it might just have been frozen video drivers, but I wasn't running SSH, so I couldn't check. But after it rebooted, it came right up -- I think there's some code to recompile the NVidia linking kernel module for you after a reboot. Guess it didn't work the first time (maybe my SSD-based system boots too fast), but it seemed to take on the second.

In other words, I might have had the same problem, but my inability to switch to TTY1 meant that I rebooted, and it may have fixed itself.

I had a similar issue. Looks like in 12.10 they've given the axe to the previous proprietary drivers window that would pop up, detect your video card and offer to install drivers. It was perfectly functional but they removed in favor of a half implemented tab in "software sources". Weird, but not the first time they rush something to squeeze it in a release.

Similar in Mint (ubuntu derivative), I had to go and search for the nvidia experimental 310 package. It's the kind of thing, especially with the ubuntu gaming 'push', that it should either just work or be very obvious where you go to set the setting.

And YEAH! Also got into the beta. And my laptop isn't high end anymore. So I figure more and more players will get into the beta now.

I got in, too! Getting it running under Debian was a major pain, but it's working now. This Debian install is fairly recent, so I'm still actually using the Nouveau drivers instead of the NVIDIA binaries, and they're not sufficient to run TF2, but SPAZ is fine, and I bet a lot of other Humble Bundle games that I hadn't yet bothered to redeem on Steam will be fine, too.

Me too! Just got the email.

I'm tagging.

I installed Steam on my laptop, which is my new playthingy.

Opt in the beta, waiting to see if I'll be invited.

but, It's like learning DOS all over again. I feel like I'm young again! (With too much need of sleep..)

oh, and if someone could help me as well, I'm trying to install some humblebundle games I got over there, but since they aren't .deb files, I'll need to learn how to install them.

If it's not a deb file, then you probably only have to unzip the game folder and run the executable; no install required. I don't know how you would easily make a shortcut to it on your desktop, as it seems to have become more difficult in the past few years.

psoplayer wrote:

If it's not a deb file, then you probably only have to unzip the game folder and run the executable; no install required. I don't know how you would easily make a shortcut to it on your desktop, as it seems to have become more difficult in the past few years.

Usually the Desktop is still just a dir in your filesystem so you should be able to make a symbolic link to the executable.

SixteenBlue wrote:
psoplayer wrote:

If it's not a deb file, then you probably only have to unzip the game folder and run the executable; no install required. I don't know how you would easily make a shortcut to it on your desktop, as it seems to have become more difficult in the past few years.

Usually the Desktop is still just a dir in your filesystem so you should be able to make a symbolic link to the executable.

True, but Gnome also has their .desktop files that list a program and provide an icon with some other meta-info that makes it look nicer. Additionally you could have them show up in the old Gnome menu, and at this point it seems like a properly crafted one will automatically show up in a search with the new unity launcher, but it's too much trouble to have to create one. With gnome 2 there was a gui for creating a program launcher (.desktop) but with unity it seems like you're stuck making a copy of an existing one and editing it with gedit to get it right.

psoplayer wrote:
SixteenBlue wrote:
psoplayer wrote:

If it's not a deb file, then you probably only have to unzip the game folder and run the executable; no install required. I don't know how you would easily make a shortcut to it on your desktop, as it seems to have become more difficult in the past few years.

Usually the Desktop is still just a dir in your filesystem so you should be able to make a symbolic link to the executable.

True, but Gnome also has their .desktop files that list a program and provide an icon with some other meta-info that makes it look nicer. Additionally you could have them show up in the old Gnome menu, and at this point it seems like a properly crafted one will automatically show up in a search with the new unity launcher, but it's too much trouble to have to create one. With gnome 2 there was a gui for creating a program launcher (.desktop) but with unity it seems like you're stuck making a copy of an existing one and editing it with gedit to get it right.

GNOME has a menu editor called Alacarte that can create those .desktop files without you having to worry about the details; I'm guessing that Unity should find those, too.

What format did the Humble Bundle games come in? What's the extension on the filename you downloaded?