Adventure Gaming Catch-All

Huh. Looks like the series changed hands again. Assemble Entertainment is listed as developer/publisher and not Codemasters who was the rights holder at the time Reloaded was funding (and is still listed as the publisher on GOG).

was it for this, by any chance...

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Has anyone given Bear With Me a try?

garion333 wrote:

Has anyone given Bear With Me a try?

I picked it up in a Steam sale bundle, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

benign1 wrote:
garion333 wrote:

Has anyone given Bear With Me a try?

I picked it up in a Steam sale bundle, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

Modern life is tough, isn't it?

garion333 wrote:

IMAGE(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/5adEAHL8uNg/hqdefault.jpg)
Has anyone given Bear With Me a try?

No, but my fiancee would love this. Thanks for sharing.

Cyan is cooking up something for the Myst 25th Anniversary:

With 2018 marking the 25th anniversary of Myst, Cyan would like to celebrate this journey.

Over the last few years we’ve been working to procure the rights to make all of the Myst games available. As an indie developer, resources are limited for development, and acquiring rights isn’t always an option. But we managed to finally talk to all the right people and departments and put some funding together to try to make it happen. With agreements in place, we’re happy to announce that we’ll be releasing updated (for Windows 10) versions of all the Myst games later this year!

And for those of you who are interested, we wanted to create a physical collection in a unique package with a cool artifact — a limited, collectors edition, only available for the 25th anniversary. Stay tuned.

I'm not a super fan of the Myst series (love the aesthetics but generally find them too obtuse for my taste) but as someone who likes gaming history it's been super disappointing to see the 3rd and 4th game unavailable digitally due to whatever legal issues there are with Ubisoft and Presto to get them available again. So it's cool to hear that Cyan's got the rights (at least temporarily) to make the whole series available!

shoptroll wrote:

I'm not a super fan of the Myst series (love the aesthetics but generally find them too obtuse for my taste) but as someone who likes gaming history it's been super disappointing to see the 3rd and 4th game unavailable digitally due to whatever legal issues there are with Ubisoft and Presto to get them available again. So it's cool to hear that Cyan's got the rights (at least temporarily) to make the whole series available!

Agreed. If they build in a nice hint system I would certainly check them out.

Now can we get please get some remastered Zork Myst-likes?

shoptroll wrote:

Cyan is cooking up something for the Myst 25th Anniversary:

...And for those of you who are interested, we wanted to create a physical collection in a unique package with a cool artifact — a limited, collectors edition, only available for the 25th anniversary. Stay tuned.

I'm not usually one for collector's editions, but the pewter squee on my desk says there's virtually no way I'll be able to resist that. Time to start saving up...

PaladinTom wrote:

Now can we get please get some remastered Zork Myst-likes?

Probably too much to ask from Activision, but I'd be all in for those as well. Only, how to remaster all that FMV? (I guess that applies somewhat to Myst as well...)

New game incoming from the Primorida team:

(Source)

I thought we'd mentioned this game in the thread previously, but I went back a few pages, and couldn't find anything. We need to talk about.... The Darkside Detective

I've just wrapped it up, and it's great. Point and click adventure game, pixel art, no voice acting, simple gameplay (seriously, this from the woman who usually has a walkthrough all the time: trust me, it's really not hard at all). Hilarious jokes (some fourth wall breaking), great atmosphere (Ben Prunty soundtrack!). The story is quirky and the writing is brilliant with some great oneliners.
The post-credits art promised us a second game if they sell enough copies, and I really hope there is one. The game is short, about three hours, and completely "bite sized" as it's cut up in 6 separate cases (and a bonus Christmas case!).
Well worth your time, and going on my GOTY list.

neat! I've been meaning to check that one out at some point. I'll move it further up the "to do" list

No Mac support? Booo!

(Totally understand why they can't afford to do that, though.)

pyxistyx wrote:

Also...

The $1,000 tier may be the best thing I've ever seen on kickstarter. All the cool swag plus a truly unique original art that you might have never even seen before? swoon!

Lack of OSTs in those tiers makes me sad. Also kinda sad that Ubisoft never had interest in getting III and IV onto GOG.

Minarchist wrote:
pyxistyx wrote:

Also...

The $1,000 tier may be the best thing I've ever seen on kickstarter. All the cool swag plus a truly unique original art that you might have never even seen before? swoon!

Early bird gets the 1k tier. Only 25 of those were available and they’re all gone!... amazing.
I knew this project was in the works (probably thanks to this thread), but didn’t know it’s be a Kickstarter. Count me in!

Today's bundle at IndieGala is good for adventure gamers. I've used them a number of times and they are reputable, though their bundles usually suck, so it is always surprising when there is a decent one

Syberia 3 is 75% off on Steam, PSA.

Hello fellow adventure gamers! I came across this book about The art of point and click adventure games. Looks pretty cool, I’m even thinking of getting the Collector’s Edition!

Looks like a really nice coffee table book.

Reminds me is Darkside Detective worth a purchase?

Keeps popping up on Steam store, mainly due to it being recommended by you at some point Eleima.

... so I guess you're bound to say yes, thinking about it (edit. Especially as I've just scrolled back up thread a little. Skimmers).

Anyone else?

Bubblefuzz wrote:

Reminds me is Darkside Detective worth a purchase?

Yes, absolutely.

“Bubblefuzz” wrote:

Keeps popping up on Steam store, mainly due to it being recommended by you at some point Eleima.
... so I guess you're bound to say yes, thinking about it (edit. Especially as I've just scrolled back up thread a little. Skimmers).
Anyone else?

Oh well, ^^ hehe. Yeah, I really liked it. Even got the soundtrack last week. There’s a free demo on Steam, FYI. I don’t know that many people here have played it: only three people in Steam friends own it and I have over 300 Steam friends, almost all from GWJ.
If you get it during the Steam summer sale (I got it discounted during the winter sale), it’s a no brainer.

Eleima wrote:

Hello fellow adventure gamers! I came across this book about The art of point and click adventure games. Looks pretty cool, I’m even thinking of getting the Collector’s Edition!

ooooo...fancy!

going on the 'to buy' list

So one of the perks of buying no games this year is that I’ve jumped into games I had sitting on my GOG list. I just finished the first Police Quest today. I had played PQ4 when it was new but never the older ones. I played the VGA version, and it was an interesting mix of Sierra issues: I found the puzzles pretty easily figure-outable and only used a FAQ for phone numbers I’d forgotten to write down. On the other hand, missing just about any step in most situations ends with your death, so you have to save constantly, which is fine I guess once you get used to it. I thought it was funny that this game is listed on many sites as having a great story—it comes across almost like a police story written by children as far as plotting goes. Overall I enjoyed it but it’s not a must play unless you’re nostalgic for old Sierra games in general.

Now if I could just remember what I was doing where I left off in Queat for Glory 4....

I remember playing the first Police Quest when I was something like 8 or 9 and thinking it was SO COOL the first time I got in my car and got a game over because the police training manual requires you to perform a complete visual inspection of your car before you get in (or something like that). IT'S JUST LIKE BEING A REAL POLICE OFFICER! I bought the PQ collection sometime in the last couple of years (a Humble Bundle, I think?), I should check it out again. I was going to say that I miss the eccentricities of old adventure games, but I think it might be more accurate to say I just miss being 8 or 9 and being amazed by everything.

I miss the eccentricities of older games in general, as well as using out of game resources which to me make playing them more immersive (I’ve bought a couple of complete in box old PC games from eBay to have the maps and manuals physically in front of me while playing the GOG version of the game). Also, taking notes for a game in a physical notebook rules.

I'm surprised neither of these games appears to have their own posts, but I suppose they'll fit here: I've started playing Beyond: Two Souls as I think about whether I want to buy Detroit: Become Human.

David Cage is a very bad writer of dialogue and characters, but I have always loved the approach of making games as interactive cinematic experiences, enjoying Indigo Prophecy/Fahrenheit and Heavy Rain a whole lot. As an Amiga-owning kid in the late 80s/early 90s, I loved Cinemaware's games (Rocket Ranger, It Came From the Desert, and Wings most prominent in my memories), which I hardly ever see referenced anywhere, but styled themselves as interactive midcentury pulpy B-movies in a way that left a strong imprint on my brain. Quantic Dreams is one of few companies that seems interested in working in that mold, though Telltale and a handful of other recent examples are working in this area too.

I didn't play Beyond when it first came out because it released on PS3 right around when the PS4 came out, so I couldn't justify spending more money on video games at that time, especially for the previous console generation. But I got Beyond on Playstation Plus and have started it, figuring I can wait to pick up Detroit after I've completed Beyond and Vampyr (which is perhaps somewhere in this same style?). So far Beyond is...not great!

As part of the Remastered version on PS4 you can choose to play the events in the "original" order, all jumbled up in time, or you can play the events chronologically. I chose the original, wanting to experience the game as it was initially intended, but man, playing these things out of order makes it hard to think about who Jodie is and what choices she would make. Part of the fun of this type of game is getting in the heads of the characters you control and responding the way you think they would, but when I'm playing Adult Jodie, and then Child Jodie, and then Teen Jodie, it's hard to have a coherent concept of why she might make the decisions she could make. It seems like major events of her childhood might influence how she handles stuff as an adult, but if I'm making choices for her as an adult before I know what happened to her as a teen or as a kid, how am I supposed to react to that? The nonchronological ordering seems like a bad idea, and also contributes to the odd pacing of the game.

I also kind of hate the controls. I've always appreciated the way Quantic Dreams games make your controller inputs mirror real-world actions. It feels cool to turn a doorknob by making a similar rotation of your right stick. Beyond, however, seems to have dialed back many of the motions (interacting with an object tends to be just pushing your right stick in its direction) and has all these other systems I hate--the fighting system is unintuitive, controlling Aiden's ghost camera feels swimmy and disorienting, and the "cover shooter" style section I just completed (CIA training sequence) was both confusing and not fun.

Also, I had a really baffling story sequence early on, involving a party that teen Jodie goes to:

Spoiler:

So, she's invited to a birthday party for the daughter of someone who is in the lab that studies her, which everyone seems to treat as a much more normal idea than it is. At first, I enjoyed giving Jodie the chance to open up a little, drink a little, dance a little, even kiss a boy who seemed nice and normal enough. Then someone says "hey Jodie has cool powers, show us!" and so I make the lights spark and like a book fall over, which doesn't actually seem like that big of a deal, yet everyone kinda freaks out over it. Then it's present time and Jodie gives the birthday girl an old book of Edgar Allen Poe poems and the birthday girl instead of just being confused/unimpressed, is like I HATE YOU, YOU SUCK, and suddenly the boy who was nice and who, thirty seconds ago, had danced with Jodie and kissed her and said she was special was like YEAH SHE'S A FREAK, LET'S ALL HOLD HER DOWN AND LOCK HER UP IN THE CLOSET AS SHE STRUGGLES AND CRIES! What the hell kinda parties did David Cage go to as a kid? Who acts like this? At least it did make me feel motivated to use Aiden to scare the kids afterward (though I did not follow through on the apparent ability to burn the house down?), but man, that scene did not make sense to me at all. One of many examples of a Quantic Dreams game really missing the mark on subtlety.

So this really isn't clicking for me so far, but I am a big dumb dope for games where, when the scene ends, I see a "XX% of players made the choice you did, but YY% of players did this other thing." And I like that these games just go forward. With the exception of the bad mechanics in the CIA training sequence that required me to re-try something a few times, generally you just play the sequence and, whether you fail or succeed, the game moves on. If I finish this game, it'll be because every time I sit down to play it, I know I'm going to make progress.

Finally, it is the most Quantic Dreams thing imaginable that Jodie's ghost friend is named "Aiden," a reasonably normal name that people have, but everyone in the game pronounces it "Aye-den", a thing an American-accented English speaking person would never do.

Eleima wrote:

Hello fellow adventure gamers! I came across this book about The art of point and click adventure games. Looks pretty cool, I’m even thinking of getting the Collector’s Edition!

I might have to get that. Looks like it would be a good companion to the Art of Sierra if/when that ever comes out!

Warriorpoet897 wrote:

I thought it was funny that this game is listed on many sites as having a great story—it comes across almost like a police story written by children as far as plotting goes. Overall I enjoyed it but it’s not a must play unless you’re nostalgic for old Sierra games in general.

Can't say I've played the PQ games, but some of the development stories behind them are interesting to say the least. Like Jim Walls not really getting how to design/script a game so they had Al Lowe work with him on PQ1:

You should've seen Police Quest I when I got onto the project. Oh my God. Ken assigned Jim to a programmer, and the programmer was a nice guy, but he was just not a real hard worker, and wasn't really into adventure games, I guess. So after 12 months on the job, they finally looked at the game and said, this sucks, this isn't working! I had finished Larry I, and they said, "Can you bail out these guys?" I said sure and went over, and what I realized was that Jim had written up this entire story, the programmer had implemented it, but without any of the things Jim didn't think of, therefore it was impossible to play! Jim knew the story and knew all the rules and what were you supposed to do, and the programmer had only put in the stuff that Jim had specified would happen. It was the most bizarre to game to play, because you'd get to a situation and say, what would I do? And Jim has this great wealth of knowledge of police work and he'd say, it's obvious! Well, it's obvious to you, because you'd been trained as a police officer! Nobody else is gonna figure that out! So the big project that summer was to go through and come with any kind of hints, some kind of dialogue and radio commands that would enable you to figure out what the hell you were supposed to be doing.

(Also, it's an old book and probably in need of updates but since we're on the subject of books and Adventure games... I highly recommend HG101's Guide to Classic Adventure Games. It's a good read and covers pretty much every major series up to the mid-2000s)

I think Jim was also a big stickler for protocol/"authenticity" which is why you have to do things like walk around the vehicle 3 times or you'll die

Jim also left Sierra (and ended up at Tsunami Media) part way through PQ3's development so it was finished up by Jane Jensen which explains why tonally the game whiplashes all over the place (and the odd occult plotline). It was effectively a test-run for Gabriel Knight.

Police Quest 1 was the first game my dad bought me for our new IBM Clone PC in the office when I was 7. While I’d seen King’s Quest at a friend’s house in the neighborhood, PQ is what really started my whole PC gaming train a’ rollin’ (and my typing train...it’s what taught me how). The warm nostalgia I have for that game is hard to put into words.

I was completely obsessed. So obsessed, I demanded we bring it when he had to take me into work one day that first week so I could install it on a PC lying around in the office. I work for the same (big, very corporate) company today and we’d never get away with that now, but it was so fun at the time.

Playing a little more Beyond, and I completed the big action set piece that I remember being showed at all the pre-release coverage (running through the woods, being confronted by a bunch of police). As with most Quantic games, there were some frustrating spots where I was making choices accidentally. When I took control of a sniper, I wanted to have him like toss away his gun or leave the area; instead you're just forced to shoot cops in the head. That was not my plan, but oh well. Also, there's a bad conflict between their systems where, on the one hand, if someone punches at you, you have to point the right stick in their direction to block, but on the other hand, if an object is coming at you, you have to point the right stick away from them to dodge. Particularly when things are moving quickly, or when a person throws a thing at you, it's hard to know what you're supposed to do. A little frustrating, but these action scenes are still exciting enough that I'm going to keep pushing forward on this.