Adventure Gaming Catch-All

Archangel wrote:
The Book of Unwritten Tales is 75% off ($5) for another 10 hours as part of the Linux sale. Just played through a bunch of the demo, and man is it funny. Good reviews too!

Grrrr, not making it easy to pass this one up.

Jolly Bill wrote:
Archangel wrote:
The Book of Unwritten Tales is 75% off ($5) for another 10 hours as part of the Linux sale. Just played through a bunch of the demo, and man is it funny. Good reviews too!

Grrrr, not making it easy to pass this one up.


Don't! It's really good.

Need to finish Resonance before buying another adventure game, but it's added to the list.

Oh, and Resonance is pretty interesting, too. I really like how you can add previous experiences or items in the room as conversation options. It's a pretty intuitive interface that does present a lot of options, I'm happy with it. Still early on, but it's my project for the beginning of March.

Minarchist wrote:
Jolly Bill wrote:
Archangel wrote:
The Book of Unwritten Tales is 75% off ($5) for another 10 hours as part of the Linux sale. Just played through a bunch of the demo, and man is it funny. Good reviews too!

Grrrr, not making it easy to pass this one up.


Don't! It's really good.

Too late! Not on sale anymore

I did pick up the first one though with a bunch of other Linux games. How's the second one though?

Has anyone tried The Journey Down: Chapter One? I grabbed this one on Steam during a sale, but have yet to boot it up. It looks interesting, and seems to have a great sense of style. I'm thinking it'll be a great pallet-cleanser.

Himalaya Studios (aka AGD Interactive, aka those people who remade all those King's Quest games) has a Kickstarter to raise money to finish up Mage's Initiation which seems to be taking many cues from Quest for Glory. They're most of the way to the $65,000 goal and have quite a bit of time to reach it.

Nicholaas wrote:
Has anyone tried The Journey Down: Chapter One? I grabbed this one on Steam during a sale, but have yet to boot it up. It looks interesting, and seems to have a great sense of style. I'm thinking it'll be a great pallet-cleanser.

I believe most of the sites I read were fond of the original AGS version.

Just thought I'd remind all the adventure gaming fans the Dream Chapters: The Longest Journey Kickstarter is almost done (4 more days)! It has sailed past the original goal and stretch goals, but needs a surge to reach The Longest Journey Home, a true 2-D sequel to the Longest Journey and April's story: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...

I started The Longest Journey over the weekend and so far I'm digging it. Although the graphics are dated, it's easy enough to take myself back to an era where they were cutting edge, and after not very long I find myself immersed in the story. I'm up to Chapter 2 so far, and things feel like they're progressing nicely, if a bit slow (lots of dialog!). How long of a game am I looking at here, assuming that I'm neither a wizard (or cheater) with the puzzles or a complete dumbass.?

AndrewA wrote:
I started The Longest Journey over the weekend and so far I'm digging it. Although the graphics are dated, it's easy enough to take myself back to an era where they were cutting edge, and after not very long I find myself immersed in the story. I'm up to Chapter 2 so far, and things feel like they're progressing nicely, if a bit slow (lots of dialog!). How long of a game am I looking at here, assuming that I'm neither a wizard (or cheater) with the puzzles or a complete dumbass.?

Let's just say....it earns it's name.

Steam clocks me at 17 hours. Long enough ago that I do not recall if I left the game on for a couple hours here or there, as I am wont to do. You're probably safe to estimate in the 10-13 range at max if you aren't too picky about looking up the answer when you've potentially missed something on one of the 20 areas you could potentially visit at a given time.

Big props to Archangel and Minarchist for enabling me on Book of Unwritten Tales!! A fun adventure game, good writing for the most part, but mainly because ALL of the puzzles and items are self contained to the each area making pixel hunting not such a terrible task after a while.

stevenmack wrote:
AndrewA wrote:
I started The Longest Journey over the weekend and so far I'm digging it. Although the graphics are dated, it's easy enough to take myself back to an era where they were cutting edge, and after not very long I find myself immersed in the story. I'm up to Chapter 2 so far, and things feel like they're progressing nicely, if a bit slow (lots of dialog!). How long of a game am I looking at here, assuming that I'm neither a wizard (or cheater) with the puzzles or a complete dumbass.?

Let's just say....it earns it's name.


And every minute of it is wonderful

(Cross-posted from the deals thread.)

The entire Wadjet Eye adventure catalog for $5. That's Resonance, Gemini Rue, all four Blackwell games, and even the delightful Puzzle Bots.

I'm now at the 11 hour mark in The Longest Journey - half way through Chapter 4 by the feel of things - and it really is a wonderful, if wordy-as-hell, game. I've had to break out the FAQ six times so far.... I try everything that I can think of before resorting to going to GameFAQs.... I wish that there was an in-game hint system.

For fun, here are the things I've had to look up:

Spoiler:
1. How to get the key in the subway.
A: Turns out that I missed that fact that you can look out the window in April's room once you open it. Oops.

2. What do I do with the machine outside the border house?
A: Oh - I need to use the ring to patch two wires together and start it up. Duh.

3. I still can't get the damned subway key, despite having what looks like a pretty good fishing apparatus.
A: You need to inflate the rubber ducky (which slowly deflates) and use it on your makeshift fishing thingy to apply enough tension to grab the key. Idiotic puzzle, IMO.

4. In chapter 3, once I get all of the data on the Vanguard from Burns Flipper, what the hell do I do?
A: Go back to the church on Hope Street and go to the confessionals.... ugh - no clue how I was supposed to figure that out without a lot of random wandering.

5. How do I win at the cups game in the city?
A: By using a screwdriver on the cups which magically reveals which one the coin is under. This one made absolutely no sense at all. Even worse than the rubber duckie.

6. What do I do once I talk to everyone in the city in Arcadia and exhaust every conversation option?
A: Talk to the old sailor again, of course!!! Sigh.

FWIW, the rubber ducky puzzle is widely maligned as the worst in that game. Of course, it happens to be the biggest over-arching puzzle of the beginning. Rest assured that nothing else that bad is coming your way.

I believe the screwdriver one was the one I remember looking up. It wasn't just using the screwdriver, there was something magnetic involved in the exchange as well, but instead of just using the magnet you had to rub it on the screwdriver to make the screwdriver magnetic or something. Either way it was rather unintuitive and not cool.

Jolly Bill wrote:
I believe the screwdriver one was the one I remember looking up. It wasn't just using the screwdriver, there was something magnetic involved in the exchange as well, but instead of just using the magnet you had to rub it on the screwdriver to make the screwdriver magnetic or something. Either way it was rather unintuitive and not cool.

No - there was nothing magnetic in the puzzle at all. It was literally: put coin on table, wait for cups handler to shuffle cups, put screwdriver near each cup to reveal which you should pick.

The screwdriver was acquired by picking it up off the ground beside a toolbox... no magnets there either.

Some screwdrivers just have magnetic tips, it makes screwing in nails in hard to reach places easier. I don't remember if they made it clear that the screwdriver in the game has one.

Whew - 21 hours and I'm done with The Longest Journey. I needed one more peek at the FAQ since my last post:

Spoiler:
7. How do you wake the sleeping giant?
A: You have to daisy chain the statues in a specific order. I knew how to make the statues work, I just didn't realize they needed to be chained together.

In the end I really enjoyed the game for it's story. The world was unique and interesting, there were some great characters, and the plot progressed at a nice clip. Aside from a few flaky puzzles early on, there was very little mind-reading required to get through the game.... certainly not nearly the amount of craziness found in a game like Machinarium or Secret of Monkey Island.

If I had one final complaint it was how abrupt the game wrapped up in chapter 13..... I like the little twist at the end, but then it felt like the writers just got tired and decided to shut it all down.

I'll have to pick up the sequel the next time it gets the Steam sale treatment - and I'm glad that I backed the kickstarter for the third installment.

Yeah, you might want to wait on the sequel for the Kickstarter then. If you think the first game ended abruptly...

tanstaafl wrote:
Yeah, you might want to wait on the sequel for the Kickstarter then. If you think the first game ended abruptly...

Indeed. I think you may be the first person I've heard feeling TLJ didn't do enough wrap-up. Dreamfall, on the other hand...

I'm more than happy to wait for a Steam sale to pick up Dreamfall. =)

Given how long-winded the story was for the first 20 hours, I guess I just expected a drawn out ending with a lot more details on the resolution of the arc that I'd been following.... instead, it was very much "bang, bang, done" and then the credits rolled.

Not a big criticism.... I loved the game, I just wanted a little bit more at the end there. =)

Has anyone tried the prequel to The Book of Unwritten Tales? I think it's called Critter's Adventure. The first one was such a treat but I haven't heard anything about the prequel.

Also I don't think Dreamfall is nearly as good as The Longest Journey. Actually from what I remember my main complaint was that it felt like less of an adventure game, it was more of an interactive fiction like Indigo Prophecy/Heavy Rain/Walking Dead but again just not as good.

Sort of old news, but I finally finished Gemini Rue (released for iOS, apparently I get gaming done on my Ipad more than PC these days).

I liked it. Sort of went in a different direction than I thought it would, but with people locked in an isolated rehabilitation center with one sole director, I guess that's how it was going to happen.

Overall, it was enjoyable. A few puzzles I refered to a walkthrough, but overall the puzzles were a little challenging, but I was able to figure it out pretty quickly. That's good I think in an adventure game. Not too obscure that you can never figure it out except by using everything on everything. Logic makes everything better. For the few I refered to a walkthrough, I probably could have figured out, but after a few different tries I just don't feel like wasting time. I must be getting old.

Overall, good game. I'd recommend it if you haven't played it already. The shooter aspect was something interesting that I haven't seen in an adventure game. Sort of a warm and fuzzy moral at the end as well. Who doesn't like that after a relatively bleak game?

Edit: I see that Another World/Out of this World is for purchase for iOS. Worth a purchase?

Citizen86 wrote:
Edit: I see that Another World/Out of this World is for purchase for iOS. Worth a purchase?

IMHO - difficult to control an already difficult game -- the original of which I loved very much.

GOG is running an indie adventure game sale this weekend. Mostly Wadjet Eye, Aamanita Design titles but there's a few others in the mix like The Longest Journey and To The Moon.

shoptroll wrote:
GOG is running an indie adventure game sale this weekend. Mostly Wadjet Eye, Aamanita Design titles but there's a few others in the mix like The Longest Journey and To The Moon.

Just picked up Primordia for $4!

I've been playing a little Resonance this last week or two. Guess I'm on an adventure kick, probably because they're relatively easy to play and get into. I've also tried getting back into X3, but that requires two hands on the keyboard/mouse and concentration. Adventure games require concentration, but in a seemingly much less hands-on sort of way.

I didn't realize it, maybe it's just because the adventure games I typically played when I was younger, namely Monkey Island, Sam n Max, Day of the Tentacle, Indiana Jones... etc. were all pretty funny and light hearted, I'm surprised that Wadget Eye games are relatively dark and moody, and rather depressing actually.

Resonance is playing well though, the graphics are on a higher level than Gemini Rue. Gameplay is good too, I love not having to switch between face, hand, tongue, and foot.

I thought I was almost done with the game

Spoiler:
at the vault, but no, someone goes crazy and we're still on the run

I'll have a few more impressions when I finish the game. Then I can try out Primordia!

Cross post with Kickstarter thread.

Armikrog.

Doug TenNapel, creator of Earthworm Jim™ (Interplay) and The Neverhood™ (Electronic Arts) has partnered with Pencil Test Studios, to create what some have called The Neverhood's "spiritual successor" -- a clay and puppet animated adventure game called ARMIKROG.