Things you should know by now, but only just discovered

If you're in Windows 8, winkey+x brings up a menu of basically all the commonly used system tools. Power options, event viewer, device manager, task manager, disk management, command prompt, etc. All in there.

winkey+x and then T is my own common route to Task Manager

Sonicator wrote:

IMAGE(http://twistedsifter.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/life-hacks-how-to-make-your-life-easier-gifs-1.gif)

Here is a video I found years ago...

I just discovered that, despite having a GTX660M in it, my laptop defaults to the integrated graphics for game. Now I know why Strike Suit Zero looked so blah.

I thought that nVidia Optimus was supposed to look look after that stuff, but apparently all it does is is prevent Just Cause 2 from launching.

spider_j wrote:

I just discovered that, despite having a GTX660M in it, my laptop defaults to the integrated graphics for game. Now I know why Strike Suit Zero looked so blah.

I thought that nVidia Optimus was supposed to look look after that stuff, but apparently all it does is is prevent Just Cause 2 from launching.

Haaaa ha. Yeah, you have to manually set it for most games it seems. I end up checking it for pretty much all games to give peace of mind.

I've never played a CCG, so though I've listened to gaming podcasts and read gaming forums for years, I had never known what this "drafting" mechanic was that is frequently mentioned, because everyone assumes that everyone else knows what it means. Then Jon Shafer finally explained it on the Game Design Roundtable this week. Sure I could have googled around for an explanation, but it never occurred to me except right when someone was talking about it.

So that's one of many things-that-everyone-who-plays-games-knows that I finally know. Huzzah!

Tanglebones wrote:

IMAGE(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-mqbb0yxycIA/UQu3pOE71ZI/AAAAAAAAlv4/g98-xL7kSRo/w497-h373/advice%2Bmallard.jpg)

Oh man...I learned this a long time ago and totally forgot about it until now! SWEET!

Parallax Abstraction wrote:
Tanglebones wrote:

IMAGE(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-mqbb0yxycIA/UQu3pOE71ZI/AAAAAAAAlv4/g98-xL7kSRo/w497-h373/advice%2Bmallard.jpg)

Oh man...I learned this a long time ago and totally forgot about it until now! SWEET!

There's one catch...the most common reason I bring up the task manager is that a full-screen game has crashed and the screen has gone black, and alt-tabbing does nothing. If this happens, just bringing up the task manager may not help because you can't see the task manager. In this case, CTRL+ALT+DEL is still useful because its secondary effect is to reset the screen mode and take back control from the full-screen program.

Gremlin wrote:

There's one catch...the most common reason I bring up the task manager is that a full-screen game has crashed and the screen has gone black, and alt-tabbing does nothing. If this happens, just bringing up the task manager may not help because you can't see the task manager. In this case, CTRL+ALT+DEL is still useful because its secondary effect is to reset the screen mode and take back control from the full-screen program.

I was going to bring that up but got lazy. I've had several instances where that has happened to me, too.

FeralMonkey wrote:

I've never played a CCG, so though I've listened to gaming podcasts and read gaming forums for years, I had never known what this "drafting" mechanic was that is frequently mentioned, because everyone assumes that everyone else knows what it means. Then Jon Shafer finally explained it on the Game Design Roundtable this week. Sure I could have googled around for an explanation, but it never occurred to me except right when someone was talking about it.

So that's one of many things-that-everyone-who-plays-games-knows that I finally know. Huzzah!

But... but what does it mean? What is the Game Design Roundtable? How can I know this knowledge?!

BadKen wrote:
FeralMonkey wrote:

I've never played a CCG, so though I've listened to gaming podcasts and read gaming forums for years, I had never known what this "drafting" mechanic was that is frequently mentioned, because everyone assumes that everyone else knows what it means. Then Jon Shafer finally explained it on the Game Design Roundtable this week. Sure I could have googled around for an explanation, but it never occurred to me except right when someone was talking about it.

So that's one of many things-that-everyone-who-plays-games-knows that I finally know. Huzzah!

But... but what does it mean? What is the Game Design Roundtable? How can I know this knowledge?!

http://thegamedesignroundtable.com/2...

BadKen wrote:

But... but what does it mean?

You're a nut! You're crazy in the coconut! That boy needs therapy.

Thanks for the link. I started listening to that and quickly realized that I couldn't care less about card games (or maybe it was just the voice of their guest the card game designer). I'm still curious what deck building is all about, but I don't want to listen to an hour of talk that doesn't interest me to find that out. I guess I'll google it.

Dominion is considered a draft? I thought it was specifically the "pick & pass" a la 7 Wonders.

Isn't that, by definition, drafting?

Drafting is, strictly, where each player gets a pack of cards without knowing the contents. They then select some of the cards to keep and give the rest to other players, usually by the "pick one and pass the rest to your left" method. This allows for all of the players to build decks from random cards but with an approximately even footing, which is why it's popular for CCGs like Magic which have a huge variability in card power.

7 Wonders is a card/board game that uses the drafting mechanic for card selection within the game's fixed set of cards, rather than with large and changing pool of randomized booster packs. This gives it some of the interesting mechanics from CCGs without the extra expense and other weak points of the CCGs. It also means that the drafting happens as part of the game itself rather than as part of the metagame deck setup that happens before the actual gameplay. There are a few other games that also use drafting mechanics as part of their mechanics, since it's a good way to force balance and interesting choices.

Dominion is buying cards to add to your deck from a randomized but publicity available set of cards, which is termed deck building. CCGs also use deck building, but as part of the, you guessed it, metagame deck setup that happens before the actual gameplay. Dominion makes building and managing your deck a part of the game itself. Dominion is, indeed, awesome and you should play it.

While Dominion was the first deck-building-focused game, opinions vary as to whether it's the best deck building game. Thunderstone and Ascension both do very different takes on the same general pattern, and some people prefer one of them over Dominion. Plus, A Few Acres of Snow uses deck building as one part of the game, Quarriors is deck building but with dice instead of cards, and there's a few other interesting examples out there.

Short version: Magic and other CCGs had a lot of stuff that happened while you were setting up the game that turned out to be even more fun when made into a game by itself.

PRG013 wrote:

Here is a video I found years ago...

Wish I'd seen that one first - took me a while to puzzle out how the witchcraft in the gif actually worked.

BadKen wrote:

Thanks for the link. I started listening to that and quickly realized that I couldn't care less about card games (or maybe it was just the voice of their guest the card game designer). I'm still curious what deck building is all about, but I don't want to listen to an hour of talk that doesn't interest me to find that out. I guess I'll google it.

And when you do, find yourself a copy of the game Dominion. It is arguably the best in the genre.
EDIT Whoops, I guess I skipped over the drafting comment above and only read "I'm still curious what deck building is all about..." In which Dominion is a great example, certainly not for drafting though. My mistake.

Gravey wrote:
BadKen wrote:

But... but what does it mean?

You're a nut! You're crazy in the coconut! That boy needs therapy.

What you did there. I seed it.

Gremlin wrote:

Short version: Magic and other CCGs had a lot of stuff that happened while you were setting up the game that turned out to be even more fun when made into a game by itself.

I'm going to kick off the next great gaming trend: RPGs, where the whole game is just creating your hero.

Edit: NO ONE STEAL MY IDEA.

Gravey wrote:
Gremlin wrote:

Short version: Magic and other CCGs had a lot of stuff that happened while you were setting up the game that turned out to be even more fun when made into a game by itself.

I'm going to kick off the next great gaming trend: RPGs, where the whole game is just creating your hero.

Edit: NO ONE STEAL MY IDEA.

Here's your game name: HeroHERO

Now pay me my money

Gravey wrote:
Gremlin wrote:

Short version: Magic and other CCGs had a lot of stuff that happened while you were setting up the game that turned out to be even more fun when made into a game by itself.

I'm going to kick off the next great gaming trend: RPGs, where the whole game is just creating your hero.

Edit: NO ONE STEAL MY IDEA.

I've been playing this for years. I was playing it before it was cool.

< /RPGHipster>

Gravey wrote:
Gremlin wrote:

Short version: Magic and other CCGs had a lot of stuff that happened while you were setting up the game that turned out to be even more fun when made into a game by itself.

I'm going to kick off the next great gaming trend: RPGs, where the whole game is just creating your hero.

Edit: NO ONE STEAL MY IDEA.

That was the best part of City of Heroes.

Gravey wrote:

I'm going to kick off the next great gaming trend: RPGs, where the whole game is just creating your hero.

Edit: NO ONE STEAL MY IDEA.

I spent far more time rolling up D&D characters in my youth than actually playing D&D. I suspect that was the case for a lot of people

Gravey wrote:

I'm going to kick off the next great gaming trend: RPGs, where the whole game is just creating your hero.

Edit: NO ONE STEAL MY IDEA.

I'm pretty sure that's called Rolemaster, where you spend three hours creating a character only to have a rat score a critical hit on your jugular on the first turn of combat.

Or Traveller, where character creation was a game in itself. With a chance of the character dying.

misplacedbravado wrote:

Or Traveller, where character creation was a game in itself. With a chance of the character dying.

So slightly worse than Cyberpunk?

Nosferatu wrote:
misplacedbravado wrote:

Or Traveller, where character creation was a game in itself. With a chance of the character dying.

So slightly worse than Cyberpunk?

I used to have Mega Traveller, which was an 80s top-down RPG for DOS. Half the game was seriously character creation. I'd always push my guys to skill up in weapon use, so that I have a squad of geezers with neural lasers

The entirety of James Burke's Connections series is now on YouTube. I guess something happened and the rights reverted back to him. If you want to watch some stuff from the golden age of TLC, before it became another reality trash dumpster, this is among the best of that era.

Nosferatu wrote:
misplacedbravado wrote:

Or Traveller, where character creation was a game in itself. With a chance of the character dying.

So slightly worse than Cyberpunk?

Yeah, it was one of the inspirations for Cyberpunk's "lifepath" system.

The typical Traveller character had served in the military for a while before mustering out and taking up adventuring. In character creation, each term of service got you a chance to roll for a skill, but you also had to roll to see if the character was killed or kicked out of the service. Keep re-enlisting and you can get more skills (and more money/stuff) to start the game proper with, but you also you increase the chance that your character will die and you have to start over.