Things you should know by now, but only just discovered

jrralls wrote:
Tscott wrote:

One of my favorite books is Godel,But his basic argument was that computers would only know the rules and the outcomes of moves, but humans could think outside the rules, and use intuition to make leaps that a computer never could.

Well, by that standards almost every human can beat the world’s most powerful super computer at chess; the human just need to take a sledgehammer to the computer and they will “win.”

I think it's more letter of the law vs spirit of the law thing.
Alternatively, the difference between hard rules and assumptions/guidelines/traditions.

jrralls wrote:
Tscott wrote:

One of my favorite books is Godel,But his basic argument was that computers would only know the rules and the outcomes of moves, but humans could think outside the rules, and use intuition to make leaps that a computer never could.

Well, by that standards almost every human can beat the world’s most powerful super computer at chess; the human just need to take a sledgehammer to the computer and they will “win.”

I believe that called The Wookiee’s Gambit

DanB wrote:
Evan E wrote:
CaptainCrowbar wrote:

...Primary colours are an artificial concept anyway, having nothing to do with the physics of light...

IIRC, they're not completely artificial, in that they reflect the receptors in the eyes - the three different types of cones (as opposed to the rods, which process low-level light w/o color information) have peak responses to the frequencies that correspond to red, green, and blue.

Not really, we have 3 photopsins with wavelength absorption peaks at 420nm, 534nm and 564nm. The 420nm one is somewhat unambiguiously what you might consider a blue detecting pigment (interestingly it is the least sensitive/responsive of the 3) and it's absorption spectra is well separated from the other two. The other two do have slightly different peak absorptions but they both absorb nearly all the way across the green-red portion of the spectrum. So they are arguably both red-green receptor pigments rather than being selective green and red absorbers.

Your brain seperates out the colours green and red in your visual field by doing some clever differential/subtractive analysis of exactly how strongly and how many of each type of cone is firing (i.e. it's not the case that only the red cones fire when red light arrives).

Side note: this set up is why red-green colour blindness exists. A mutation in one of the photopsin genes means the peak absorption of the 543nm (IIRC) pigment is shifted to be nearly on top of the 564nm pigment. And this prevents the brain from being able to detect any differential firing in the respective types of cones.

And that is also how the color blind corrective glasses work; selectively block the middle of the overlap so that light that does come through is less ambiguous.

If you get hard locked into a program in Windows and can't Alt+F4 out of it or open up task manager, just sign out of Windows and it'll hard-stop any frozen programs.

Windows + X get's you to the menu you need for that if you don't want to go the route of hitting the Start button.

Heard on the 99% Invisible podcast the other day:

99% Invisible wrote:

Many of the people who worked on the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos were young. “The average age was 29,” says Alan Carr, the senior historian at LANL. “There were a lot of young single people here. There were a lot of young couples.” And as it turned out, having so many young people working on the project presented some unexpected security challenges. For one thing, quite a few people ended up having children while living in Los Alamos — a place that wasn’t even supposed to officially exist.

So in an effort to maintain secrecy, babies didn’t have “Los Alamos” named on their birth certificates. Instead, their place of birth was listed as “PO Box 1663.” Carr estimates that 100 to 150 children were born at the PO Box.

Norfair wrote:

Doh! Generic titles.

I occasionally look for a way to repair my tower since the motor broke long ago but there doesn’t seem to be an easy fix. I did find an app a while back that simulates the tower but it never worked well.

When mine turns on, it just spins and spins and spins while randomly turning lights on and off.

That Mass Effect 2 game is quite good isn’t it.

- the guy who got it free years ago but only just got round to playing it

EvilDolphin wrote:

That Mass Effect 2 game is quite good isn’t it.

- the guy who got it free years ago but only just got round to playing it

I started it almost 10 years ago and still haven't finished. Damn sidequests.

I loved ME 1 but passed on the sequels since it was announced you wouldn’t be driving around the planets scouting for things.

The little bulletin board pin above posts on the forums marks the place as where you've last read.

Roke wrote:

The little bulletin board pin above posts on the forums marks the place as where you've last read.

The what now?!?!

Yeah, it’s the “mark this post as the last one read I’ve read” button. It makes catching up on things a lot easier, especially in a forum full of mega threads.

But doesn’t the site keep track of the last post you read in a thread automatically? It does for me...

Robear wrote:

But doesn’t the site keep track of the last post you read in a thread automatically? It does for me...

It keeps track of which posts were posted after you last opened the thread. These are only the same thing if you make it all the way to the end. That’s why I mentioned catching up.

Oh, I get it now! Thanks!

It's not "Jeremy's smokin' grass today" it's "Jeremy spoke in class today." Edit: Also, didn't know the backstory to the song at all, so learned that finally as well.

Despite Eddie Vedder's mumble singing I always thought the lyrics were "Jeremy spoke in class today" but now I may go with "Jeremy's smokin' grass today"

I often sing along with songs and do the wrong lyrics on purpose just to mess with my GF, "Hold me closer Tony Danza" and "There's a bathroom on right" are two of my favorites.

Whitney Houston: “Aaaaye wanna smoke crack with somebody”

My wife continually insists that it’s still too soon.

I knew this, but many don't: bibles in hotels are placed by the Gideons, and they WANT you to take the bibles home to read, convert, and evangelize. Clever, eh?

MaxShrek wrote:

I knew this, but many don't: bibles in hotels are placed by the Gideons, and they WANT you to take the bibles home to read, convert, and evangelize. Clever, eh?

Sooo, not to use as emergency rolling papers for spliffs then?

I'll inform my old college roommates forthwith.

John of Patmos would approve.

I have a nice version of The Teachings of Buddha that I picked up in a California hotel room. Seen 'em in Hawai'i too.

I'm looking to visit someplace that has The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius lying around, frankly. I think I'd be comfortable there lol.

Jonman wrote:
MaxShrek wrote:

I knew this, but many don't: bibles in hotels are placed by the Gideons, and they WANT you to take the bibles home to read, convert, and evangelize. Clever, eh?

Sooo, not to use as emergency rolling papers for spliffs then?

I'll inform my old college roommates forthwith.

I don't judge what people use them for. I don't know if it's safe to use it as rolling papers though.

RawkGWJ wrote:

Whitney Houston: “Aaaaye wanna smoke crack with somebody”

My wife continually insists that it’s still too soon.

I'm still waiting for a sequel to Waiting To Exhale. There's two jokes in that sentence!

Keithustus wrote:

I loved ME 1 but passed on the sequels since it was announced you wouldn’t be driving around the planets scouting for things.

Wait, is that really not a part of 2 and 3? Because as much as I loved doing it in Starcon 2, it was annoying in ME 1, and one of the reasons I never started playing ME 2. I never really looked into what features were changed. I think I have a free copy laying around somewhere too.

IMAGE(http://fractalsponge.net/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/isd2_134.jpg)

These are sensor domes, not shield generators.

Nope. Direct movie evidence says shield gens.

Games confirm. Some books differ. But movie is canon.

Is that not the ship's testes?
How else do a daddy ship and a mommy ship and an emperor make new ship's?

lunchbox12682 wrote:

Is that not the ship's testes?
How else do a daddy ship and a mommy ship and an emperor make new ship's?

They rub their mechanics together.

Stele wrote:

Nope. Direct movie evidence says shield gens.

Games confirm. Some books differ. But movie is canon.

https://starwars.fandom.com/wiki/Sen...

Richard Edlund, one of the special-effects artists on Return of the Jedi, noted in the February 1983 issue of Cinefex that they were "radar domes," thus, for sensor purposes.

I guess the guy who helped create them could be wrong. But this Reddit post makes a pretty compelling argument that there is no direct evidence in the movies. And that the games got it wrong for playability reasons. Also you could bring down a Star Destroyer's shields in X-Wing without touching the domes. At best they provided some local shielding but not for the whole ship.