Things you should know by now, but only just discovered

Caught a very old episode of the Simpsons last night Deep Space Homer season 5 from 1994. At the end of the episode Kent Brockman says, "I for one welcome our insect overlords."

Assuming they were indeed first, I didn't know The Simpsons coined that term.

PaladinTom wrote:

Caught a very old episode of the Simpsons last night Deep Space Homer season 5 from 1994. At the end of the episode Kent Brockman says, "I for one welcome our insect overlords."

Assuming they were indeed first, I didn't know The Simpsons coined that term.

Nope.

Jonman wrote:
PaladinTom wrote:

Caught a very old episode of the Simpsons last night Deep Space Homer season 5 from 1994. At the end of the episode Kent Brockman says, "I for one welcome our insect overlords."

Assuming they were indeed first, I didn't know The Simpsons coined that term.

Nope.

Even better! It's even older than I would've thought. Thanks.

I guess it never would've caught on though without The Simpsons reference.

Yeah, it needed the Simpsons reference to make it into the lexicon.

Jonman wrote:
PaladinTom wrote:

Caught a very old episode of the Simpsons last night Deep Space Homer season 5 from 1994. At the end of the episode Kent Brockman says, "I for one welcome our insect overlords."

Assuming they were indeed first, I didn't know The Simpsons coined that term.

Nope.

Huh, I had no idea.

My god, that trailer is so ridiculous.

Quintin_Stone wrote:
Jonman wrote:
PaladinTom wrote:

Caught a very old episode of the Simpsons last night Deep Space Homer season 5 from 1994. At the end of the episode Kent Brockman says, "I for one welcome our insect overlords."

Assuming they were indeed first, I didn't know The Simpsons coined that term.

Nope.

Huh, I had no idea.

My god, that trailer is so ridiculous.

IMAGE(https://i.giphy.com/media/kSDnkTdXYoSw8/giphy.webp)

There is a petition to ask the UK government to look at loot boxes in games in terms of exposing children to gambling. If it gets to 10,000 signatures it will be considered for discussion in parliment. You've got to be a UK resident to sign it.

Would be nice if the EU would take this up, too. Never happen in the US, despite the obvious "think of the childrens!" appeal.

The mobile gaming industry is something like $20+ billion per year. No way in hell will they allow that to be regulated in the US, because it's so easy to buy votes on legislation drafted by the industry in the first place.

Higgledy wrote:

There is a petition to ask the UK government to look at loot boxes in games in terms of exposing children to gambling. If it gets to 10,000 signatures it will be considered for discussion in parliment. You've got to be a UK resident to sign it.

Umm...did you mean to post this in some other thread?

Nope. I didn't know there was a partition until recently.

(It's also tricky to think where else it does fit )

The word "flaccid" is pronounced
flak-sid

huh! Who knew?

groan wrote:

The word "flaccid" is pronounced
flak-sid

huh! Who knew?

No it's not.

Flax seed?

Chairman_Mao wrote:

Flax seed?

I hear there's a little blue pill for that.

oilypenguin wrote:
groan wrote:

The word "flaccid" is pronounced flak-sid

No it's not.

According to freedictionary.com, the only dictionary I use, it's the British pronunciation (click the UK flag).

But I agree. That's wrong. Murica!

MeatMan wrote:
oilypenguin wrote:
groan wrote:

The word "flaccid" is pronounced flak-sid

No it's not.

According to freedictionary.com, the only dictionary I use, it's the British pronunciation (click the UK flag).

But I agree. That's wrong. Murica!

It's spelled flaccid but it's pronounced throat warbler mangrove.

MeatMan wrote:
oilypenguin wrote:
groan wrote:

The word "flaccid" is pronounced flak-sid

No it's not.

According to freedictionary.com, the only dictionary I use, it's the British pronunciation (click the UK flag).

But I agree. That's wrong. Murica!

Brit here. I have never, ever, at all heard anyone say flak-sid in the 40 years of my life and across all the bits of the UK I have lived.

I know! Right?
I'm going to start pronouncing it that way, and use it as often as possible to spread this new revelation!

Likewise, "Gerrymander" is pronounced with a hard "G", since it's named after a person, Gov. Elbridge Gerry, who created a district in 1812 that resembled a salamander to his detractors. He pronounced his name with a hard "G".

Have now confirmed with all colleagues that no one has ever heard flaksid. That said our Italian colleague did immediately point out 'eccentric' and 'access'

I've heard "flak-sid", years ago. I thought it was a regional variant.

BadKen wrote:

Yeah, she became a hell of an actress, didn’t she. From soap regular and Princess Bride, to Claire Underwood and Antiope.

I think she did an amazing job even in The Princess Bride, though, because there is definitely more to that woman than “dim and pretty.”

I liked Sorry, Haters a lot.

I just realized that "toast" notifications are called that because they pop up.

I feel dumb. Or old. But mostly dumb.

I've never even heard of the word toast being used as a synonym for pop up. Probably because I'm old.

RawkGWJ wrote:

I've never even heard of the word toast being used as a synonym for pop up. Probably because I'm old.

It's a play on words.

One of the older senses of the work Toast, which is 'to proclaim or announce'. Hence A Toastmaster is one someone announces guests or organises proceedings at a speaking event.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toastm...

So a pop-up is a literal toast in that it announces something and toast is something that pops-up when it is ready in your toaster.

DanB wrote:
RawkGWJ wrote:

I've never even heard of the word toast being used as a synonym for pop up. Probably because I'm old.

It's a play on words.

One of the older senses of the work Toast, which is 'to proclaim or announce'. Hence A Toastmaster is one someone announces guests or organises proceedings at a speaking event.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toastm...

So a pop-up is a literal toast in that it announces something and toast is something that pops-up when it is ready in your toaster.

Hmmm?

Burnt Toast wrote:
DanB wrote:

It's a play on words.

One of the older senses of the work Toast, which is 'to proclaim or announce'. Hence A Toastmaster is one someone announces guests or organises proceedings at a speaking event.

So a pop-up is a literal toast in that it announces something and toast is something that pops-up when it is ready in your toaster.

Hmmm?

No, Burnt Toast -- you're something that definitely doesn't pop up when it is ready in your toaster.

Ioun stone is pronounced "EYE-oon". I always pronounced it like ion.

My manager is a moron.

I'm a 37-year old foodie, pitmaster, chef, and connoisseur of many meats...and I just learned about the existence of the mangalica pig. It's referred to as the kobe beef of pork and its considered one of the tastiest cuts of meat in the world.

The Mangalica is one of the fattiest pigs in the world; on average 65-70% of the carcass is fat, and lean meat is only 30 - 35% of the carcass, compared to over 50% in modern breeds. But that meat is considered among the tastiest pork in the world. The meat of the Mangalica pig is reddish, highly marbled with creamy white fat, and is high in omega-3 fatty acids and natural antioxidants. This is due to the natural diet of forage, wheat, corn and barley. Mangalica lard is lighter, and melts at a lower temperature, than lard from other pigs, because it contains more unsaturated fat. In Hungary, most Mangalica pork becomes sausage or salami. Because of the high fat content, cured Mangalica pork products can spend a longer time drying, which deepens the flavor without losing moisture.

http://www.dartagnan.com/mangalica-pig-heritage-pork.html