Things you should know by now, but only just discovered

Chairman_Mao wrote:
mrwynd wrote:
Chairman_Mao wrote:

Costco's credit card offers the best extended warranty coverage I've seen on a credit card: 2 additional years regardless of the original warranty length. And this applies to all purchases, not just ones made at Costco.

WHAT?! Is this tied to their premium membership stuff or a specific card they provide?

They only have one card now, Citibank Visa, since ending their relationship with American Express. We just have a basic membership.

Hmmm, mine's a Capital One MC...

We have the "Executive" Membership at ~$115/year, and we get more than that back, every year. It pays for itself... If we went with the Basic, we'd just be out of pocket the $57/year.

Wink_and_the_Gun wrote:
Chairman_Mao wrote:
mrwynd wrote:
Chairman_Mao wrote:

Costco's credit card offers the best extended warranty coverage I've seen on a credit card: 2 additional years regardless of the original warranty length. And this applies to all purchases, not just ones made at Costco.

WHAT?! Is this tied to their premium membership stuff or a specific card they provide?

They only have one card now, Citibank Visa, since ending their relationship with American Express. We just have a basic membership.

Hmmm, mine's a Capital One MC...

We have the "Executive" Membership at ~$115/year, and we get more than that back, every year. It pays for itself... If we went with the Basic, we'd just be out of pocket the $57/year.

In Canada it's the Capital One MC. It doesn't require the executive membership, but that makes it extra worthwhile as the benefits stack (different payers, so you get 2 cheques in January).
Executive Membership - 2% back yearly on all Costco purchases

Costco CC - 1% on all purchases, 2% on restaurant, 3% on fuel.

Stacking 5%!!! when using Costco gas stations, 3% on regular purchases. Completely awesome.

Ah ok, Citibank in the US. Ours provides similar rewards but 3% on restaurants and 4% on gas. We don't spend nearly enough at Costco to make the executive membership worth it for us.

What does "executive" describe here? And is there a "legislative" card?

NothingWitty wrote:

What does "executive" describe here? And is there a "legislative" card?

User name checks out ;p

oilypenguin wrote:
NothingWitty wrote:

What does "executive" describe here? And is there a "legislative" card?

User name checks out ;p

Rumor says they are going to rename their executive card the "winning" card so everyone can walk away happy.

Mermaidpirate wrote:

If I had to guess, I would have thought a marathon was 10 or 20k, but they're 42k. I wasn't thinking of working towards one and now I'm absolutely never thinking about doing one.

Also pet peeve: can't take photos with the flashlight on.

well actually

Half marathon is 21.1k
Full marathon is 42.2k

The Commander's Challenge, which I am doing Sunday as part of the Canada Army Run, is 26.1k. (5k, then 45 minutes later, 21.1k)

mudbunny wrote:

The Commander's Challenge, which I am doing Sunday as part of the Canada Army Run, is 26.1k. (5k, then 45 minutes later, 21.1k)

In the intervening 45 minutes everybody gives blood. Twice.

Seriously though, have a good run. And stay hydrated - it looks like it's going to be pretty hot.

BushPilot wrote:
mudbunny wrote:

The Commander's Challenge, which I am doing Sunday as part of the Canada Army Run, is 26.1k. (5k, then 45 minutes later, 21.1k)

In the intervening 45 minutes everybody gives blood. Twice.

Seriously though, have a good run. And stay hydrated - it looks like it's going to be pretty hot.

I went running once after giving blood, ended up having to stop midway into the run and I noticed my vision getting narrower and narrower. Stopped for a bit and just continued walking the rest of the route and it was fine, but that slow blacking of my vision will never leave me.

And good luck with your run.

Chimalli wrote:
oilypenguin wrote:
NothingWitty wrote:

What does "executive" describe here? And is there a "legislative" card?

User name checks out ;p

Rumor says they are going to rename their executive card the "winning" card so everyone can walk away happy.

I laughed at this... Maybe a little too hard

Serious answer:
Basic Costco membership gets you in for $55+tax, for me in Canada. You get no other benefit.

Executive Costco membership gets you in + 2% rebate coupon (arrives in January), useable in the Costco store (they will "give change" off it, iirc) - costs me $110+tax. As long as my rebate cheque is larger than my membership cost... totally worth it, even if I were to only get $70 back, it's still cheaper than just being "out of pocket" the $55 for the Basic. There are also some "exclusive" deals/coupons, but whatever...

One of my favourite programmes on TV is Air Crash Investigations. One incredible episode is the 'Gimli Glider' (see below.) On a walk yesterday I found out that a fellow rambler was a retired air crash investigator who, amongst other jobs, once had to investigate a series of incidents where propellers were dropping off single engined planes. Not, as I commented at the time, ideal. It turned out a heavy part related to the prop had been hollowed out to save weight. It was still structurally sound in peek condition but, being a hollow space, it was drawing in and expelling air whenever the plane ascended to lower air pressures. In cloud it would draw in water molecules and salts and was therefore corroding at a very high rate.

On the same walk I found one woman son was responsible for the roll out of numberplate recognition software for the police. Police interceptors being another of my favourite shows.

What network is that on, Higgledy?

Wink_and_the_Gun wrote:
Chimalli wrote:
oilypenguin wrote:
NothingWitty wrote:

What does "executive" describe here? And is there a "legislative" card?

User name checks out ;p

Rumor says they are going to rename their executive card the "winning" card so everyone can walk away happy.

I laughed at this... Maybe a little too hard

Serious answer:
Basic Costco membership gets you in for $55+tax, for me in Canada. You get no other benefit.

Executive Costco membership gets you in + 2% rebate coupon (arrives in January), useable in the Costco store (they will "give change" off it, iirc) - costs me $110+tax. As long as my rebate cheque is larger than my membership cost... totally worth it, even if I were to only get $70 back, it's still cheaper than just being "out of pocket" the $55 for the Basic. There are also some "exclusive" deals/coupons, but whatever...

In the US, if you bring your rebate check to the counter and it is under $55, you ask them and it will cover the $55 upgrade fee over basic to the executive level. Have done that all 3 years now that I have had an executive membership. I have only ever paid the basic level fee for the executive membership.

Robear wrote:

What network is that on, Higgledy?

The one you don't want to watch before going on a flight somewhere.

Robear wrote:

What network is that on, Higgledy?

I watch it on National Geographic. They are repeating them all the time.

Rat Boy wrote:

The one you don't want to watch before going on a flight somewhere.

It 's a wonder that any planes actually make it to their intended destinations in one peice.

Higgledy wrote:
Robear wrote:

What network is that on, Higgledy?

I watch it on National Geographic. They are repeating them all the time.

It seems to be identical to a show called Mayday that is (was?) on The Discovery Channel in Canada. The narrator is different, perhaps for localisation, but I remember that episode and the video is the same. Mayday was an extremely entertaining show. It might be scary to watch all the ways plane crashes have happened, but it is also heartening to see how the industry/regulation has learned and improved to prevent future disasters.

Higgledy wrote:

It 's a wonder that any planes actually make it to their intended destinations in one peice.

Air Crash Investigations has 150 episodes, each featuring one crash, dating back to the 70s.

There were over 9 million passenger flight departures in the US last year alone.

The real wonder is how bad at probability people are.

Spoiler:

My day job for the last year has involved a lot of research into historical crashes that led to changes/improvements in FAA regulations for passenger aircraft. So, basically, watching this show.

If you really want to be concerned, watch some car crash tests and never leave the house again.

Gremlin wrote:

If you really want to be concerned, watch some car crash tests and never leave the house again.

You get a probability gold star.

BushPilot wrote:
Higgledy wrote:
Robear wrote:

What network is that on, Higgledy?

I watch it on National Geographic. They are repeating them all the time.

It seems to be identical to a show called Mayday that is (was?) on The Discovery Channel in Canada. The narrator is different, perhaps for localisation, but I remember that episode and the video is the same. Mayday was an extremely entertaining show. It might be scary to watch all the ways plane crashes have happened, but it is also heartening to see how the industry/regulation has learned and improved to prevent future disasters.

Yeah, it's the same show. I think it was also called Disaster Detective, among many other titles.

Used to casually watch "Mayday." I generally avoided any episodes that ended up in lots of dead people. But love the ones that ended up in survival. Of those, Gimly Glider was definitely my fav story.

The part that always gets me, is that the captain was the hero that saved all of those people by safely landing a plane with no fuel and no power where every rule in the book would have had them dead. Yet Air Canada still had to demote him as a result of that flight, as it was technically his fault for running out of fuel in the first place.

Jonman wrote:
Higgledy wrote:

It 's a wonder that any planes actually make it to their intended destinations in one peice.

Air Crash Investigations has 150 episodes, each featuring one crash, dating back to the 70s.

There were over 9 million passenger flight departures in the US last year alone.

The real wonder is how bad at probability people are.

Spoiler:

My day job for the last year has involved a lot of research into historical crashes that led to changes/improvements in FAA regulations for passenger aircraft. So, basically, watching this show.

I was hoping the ridiculousness of my comment was self evident . I don't really think the number of plane crashes on that show indicates that they are anything more than vanishingly rare. In fact I find the show reassuring because every time there is an incident they make the effort (often herculean) to find the true cause of a crash and suggest measures to make sure it can never happen again.

You have an interesting job . I love the show because of the incredible detective work involved in finding which tiny element or elements in a massive plane, with fallible pilots and support staff, caused it's eventually crash or near crash.

Jonman wrote:
Higgledy wrote:

It 's a wonder that any planes actually make it to their intended destinations in one peice.

Air Crash Investigations has 150 episodes, each featuring one crash, dating back to the 70s.

There were over 9 million passenger flight departures in the US last year alone.

The real wonder is how bad at probability people are.

Spoiler:

My day job for the last year has involved a lot of research into historical crashes that led to changes/improvements in FAA regulations for passenger aircraft. So, basically, watching this show.

That doesn't alter the fact that planes are trying to kill us all.

Also, people who work for airplane manufacturers are all evil murderers. You're just really bad at murder.

Higgledy wrote:

You have an interesting job .

I have an interesting-sounding job.

The reality of it is 50% spreadsheet-ninja, and 50% rules-lawyer. The only unusual part is that occasionally, my office goes faster and higher up than yours does.

That said, TIL that engine manufacturers will perform DNA analysis on blood smears found on jet engine fan blades to determine the size of the bird that was ingested. Today's finding - a sparrow!

BadKen wrote:

You're just really bad at murder.

Objectively true. I should really be more ashamed of my poor performance. Unless we're talking about sparrows, in which case, I'm probably due a medal or something.

Jonman wrote:
Higgledy wrote:

You have an interesting job .

I have an interesting-sounding job.

The reality of it is 50% spreadsheet-ninja, and 50% rules-lawyer. The only unusual part is that occasionally, my office goes faster and higher up than yours does.

That said, TIL that engine manufacturers will perform DNA analysis on blood smears found on jet engine fan blades to determine the size of the bird that was ingested. Today's finding - a sparrow!

BadKen wrote:

You're just really bad at murder.

Objectively true. I should really be more ashamed of my poor performance. Unless we're talking about sparrows, in which case, I'm probably due a medal or something.

How many sparrows can the blades take before needing replacement? or are other parts replaced first?

Jonman wrote:

Today's finding - a sparrow!

African or European?

Edit: Ok ok, it was an African or European swallow. Sorry!

Abu5217 wrote:
Jonman wrote:

Today's finding - a sparrow!

African or European?

Edit: Ok ok, it was an African or European swallow. Sorry!

IMAGE(https://i.makeagif.com/media/8-06-2015/6tzcHH.gif)

Perfect.

Abu5217 wrote:

How many sparrows can the blades take before needing replacement? or are other parts replaced first?

999 times out of a thousand times, many many sparrows.

Sparrow-sized birds usually cause no appreciable damage. Very, very occasionally, like a handful of times ever, a tiny bird like a sparrow can slip far enough into the compressor without being entirely minced that it can cause damage to the tiny blades at the high-pressure end of the compressor. Bear in mind that for a big-ass engine, I'm talking fan blades that are 3+ foot long, the final stage of compressor blades are under an inch long (not to mention rotating fast enough at power that the blade-tip is nearly supersonic), so it doesn't take a lot to damage them.

That said, on a modern turbofan engine, the majority of birdstrike events, by design, result in the bird traveling through the bypass duct i.e. hitting the fan blade, but not entering the core of the engine, where the next 14 stages of increasingly smaller compressor blades are. For events like that, anything much smaller than a goose or eagle won't cause damage. Fan blades are fairly easy to replace - because they're right there, accessible on the front of the engine. You can do that work on the flight line. Compressor blades, buried deep within the turbomachinery, not so much. Often times, that means you replace the entire compressor module, and that means taking the engine off-wing and shipping it to a major repair facility.

Of course, if you see evidence of birdstrike on a fan blade, you have to go check whether there's also damage to the compressor, which involves performing a borescope - sticking a tiny camera on a flexible, controllable stick into the guts of the engine and taking pictures/video of every single compressor blade (front and back) you can. It's a pain to do, takes a lot of time and skill to do properly.

Also of note, compressor damage can be detected by a modern engine control system, which monitors engine vibration signatures and trends engine performance. A sudden 0.5% drop in fuel efficiency or a 15 degree rise in peak gaspath temperature paired with a shift in the vibration signature, tells me that sh*t ain't right in there. It's increasingly commonplace for the engine manufacturer or airline to drive maintenance based on that trending.

TL:DR - Birds need to re-spec their skill trees for offense.

Jonman wrote:

TL:DR - Birds need to re-spec their skill trees for offense.

It is a tragedy that I can like this but once.