Kony 2012

Watch this video.

The speed with which this ball has begun to roll is crazy impressive.

People are saying it's fraudulent, I'll edit if I can find some legitimate proof.

Impressive to watch. Certainly the most modern approach to start a change that is needed.

Not sure why this would be fraudulent. Kony exists, the facts about him are supported by what I could find so far.
The Kony 2012 website is up and seems to be consistent with this video... I wonder who would benefit if this is
the real thing, but keep calling it fraudulent.

Sparhawk wrote:

Impressive to watch. Certainly the most modern approach to start a change that is needed.

Not sure why this would be fraudulent. Kony exists, the facts about him are supported by what I could find so far.
The Kony 2012 website is up and seems to be consistent with this video... I wonder who would benefit if this is
the real thing, but keep calling it fraudulent.

Well, all of the stuff I've seen has been on seemingly ill-researched blog posts, but people are claiming that the Invisible Children organisation is more about selling t-shirts than helping people.

They've certainly got a lot done though if they're "fraudulent." Obviously there's some truth about this if they are currently trending worldwide. I remember hearing about this in high school when Invisible Children first came out.

EDIT: I'd donate to this cause faster than any of the politicians currently running for president.

Dominic Knight wrote:

They've certainly got a lot done though if they're "fraudulent." Obviously there's some truth about this if they are currently trending worldwide. I remember hearing about this in high school when Invisible Children first came out.

EDIT: I'd donate to this cause faster than any of the politicians currently running for president.

I don't believe the claims, it's just something I felt vaguely obliged to put in the header.

link

Kony is a mass murderer, rapist of industrial capacity, and madman. But he's also got friends in Rush Limbaugh and Michelle Bachmann.

Here is more info on Rush's defense of LRA

Paleocon wrote:

link
L
Kony is a mass murderer, rapist of industrial capacity, and madman. But he's also got friends in Rush Limbaugh and Michelle Bachmann.

Gerson should take some of the advice he gives conservative commentators and stop talking about things he clearly knows very little about. Dealing with the LRA is not a humanitarian mission, it's just taking sides in one of many African power struggles. The supposed "regional governments" our military units are coordinating aren't any better than the LRA itself. Uganda is controlled by a corrupt, brutal dictator (Museveni), also uses child soldiers, has a long track record of horrific human rights abuses as well as supporting a rebel group in the Congo headed by Bemba, who is currently being prosecuted by the Congolese government for the very same sorts of war crimes Kony is being accused of. Of course, said Congolese government is ruled by another corrupt and brutal dictator, Kabila, who presides over what amounts to a nation-wide disaster area that has suffered decades of war, rape, pillage, and depradation from all sides. And capping off the list of our "allies" is South Sudan, ruled by a former SPLA member, an organization which is second only to the internationally notorious (North) Sudanese government in the list of atrocities propagated during the recent fighting in South Sudan.

The real question is why on earth we're giving any of these groups the time of day, let alone hundreds of millions of dollars and military advisors.

If people are going to stand up and make their government take action, why not start somewhere like Central Africa? Yes, in many cases we'd be dealing with the devil no matter which way we turn there. That's how awful the situation is. However, after our eyes no longer need to be on Kony, which way will they turn next?

This comment was stupid, so I deleted it.

I personally like all the attention it is getting, but do not like the idea of vandalism outlined in "Cover the Night".

I think this has gone viral and will continue to grow, but defacing a city is not necessary. The targeted people that the group are asking to lend a voice to the cause will happen without vandalism.

An interesting perspective.http://justiceinconflict.org/2012/03/07/taking-kony-2012-down-a-notch/

When we have the opportunity to remove a little bit of evil, isn't that a little bit good?

We should just warn the people participating in Cover the Night about Paleo's gas station.

just so i can be clear, are we saying that vandalism is a degree to which no one should stoop in an effort to stop possibly the most evil man of the last three generations?

i will think about that the next i see some domestic terrorist putting up her lost cat sign on my precious telephone pole.

H.P. Lovesauce wrote:

When we have the opportunity to remove a little bit of evil, isn't that a little bit good?

Conflicts are rarely black and white. They are all shades of gray where flawed humans acting in their self-interest run up against other flawed humans acting in their self-interest. Complicating it by adding another group of flawed humans acting largely out of ignorance to what's actually happening on the ground--and in the hearts and minds of the people they're supposedly helping--is just a recipe for disaster.

You just have to look at our interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan to see that we've likely caused far more death and destruction than the supposedly evil people we removed from power. Hell, even our intervention in Libya is turning south as the oil rich region of the country announced that they're going to be "semi-autonomous" yesterday.

Sometimes the safest bet is to not pick a side.

Guess we'll just wait until Kony pinches someone who's white.

Seth wrote:

just so i can be clear, are we saying that vandalism is a degree to which no one should stoop in an effort to stop possibly the most evil man of the last three generations?

i will think about that the next i see some domestic terrorist putting up her lost cat sign on my precious telephone pole.

Wow. I did not think I would get that kind of response out of people. I am happy that this issue is being addressed and I think the original intention was for the posters, etc to garnish attention and make this movement go viral and stop Joseph Kony. I respect the intentions of the camping and will be supportive. Every time someone buys a new electronic device to replace their still functioning PC, console, phone do I get mad at them for wasting coltan and negatively affecting the Congo? No. Maybe I should. One person putting up lost cast photos is not the same as the level of waste they are saying will happen on "Cover the night".

If the movement gains momentum and is being discussed on talk shows/mass media, then is the vandalism still necessary?

It seems to me that this campaign has gone viral and will not need to have a “waste a bunch or resources night”.

Invisible Children responds to criticism.

Thanks for that. That helps. I watched that video and it had that odd feeling of being more about the movement about itself than what the movement is attempting to accomplish, if that makes sense.

Also I tend to be cynical of things that immediately trend on Twitter and get picked up on by celebrities.

"You mean all I have to do to stop him is purchase an action kit where a wristband and tweet or Facebook about it. I'm in."

I don't know.

It is better to have a national conversation about this than contraceptives or Iran or whatever else is pushed on us by the Very Serious People. Good on Invisible Children.

There are a few really interesting articles and collections of opinion on the subject.

I know I stand in the camp that says i'm glad to see an eye turned towards him, but that the list of situations and people that allowed a man like Kony to exist and thrive for a period is vastly complex. Caring is important, but the blanket justification I've seen that just having "good intentions" is enough has been the bedrock of an untold number of Africa's current troubles.

This is about a sovereign nation's history, its complex internal struggles, and not portraying its residents as beings without agency or self-determination in their fate (the dude's kid features more prominently than any actual Ugandan). So, while the awareness is great, it has to encourages further dialogue and learning, which i'm afraid I don't think any Twitter or Facebook campaign will ever really do. Because if Kony, and the issues surrounding Kony are not looked at in detail, any "fix" may do more help than harm.

I understand that the only way to engage such a large number of people is through oversimplification, but this is one of the situations where by doing so, you easily run the risk of doing more harm than help.

EDIT:

A HuffPo article about Kony and the Ugandan government.

goman wrote:

It is better to have a national conversation about this than contraceptives or Iran or whatever else is pushed on us by the Very Serious People. Good on Invisible Children.

Exactly. Even if there are issues with the original video, it's still getting people to find out the truth and talk about it. The idea of being against this is just...backwards, in my opinion.

That Guardian link is excellent, Prederick.

While I do think there are substantial issues with the original video (seems to me like far too many people who are highly involved with the situation have denounced it), it did manage to do what is nearly impossible to do these days, and that's to start a conversation about issues in non-arab Africa. So I think the criticism of the video is perhaps even more important than the video itself, but without the original video there would be no dialogue at all. I think the best case scenario here would be for the dialogue move away from debating the merits of Invisible Children as an organization and its video (it definitely seems flawed at best) towards a discussion based on the actual nuanced facts at hand.

Very true, Prederick. Just like how many "send your shoes" campaigns actually strip local shoe salespeople of their livelihood, the ease with which we get something done may not mean it's the best way to go about it.

Bringing attention to a problem is a good thing. What's done afterward matters, but nothing happens at all without the first step.

Dysplastic wrote:

That Guardian link is excellent, Prederick.

While I do think there are substantial issues with the original video (seems to me like far too many people who are highly involved with the situation have denounced it), it did manage to do what is nearly impossible to do these days, and that's to start a conversation about issues in non-arab Africa. So I think the criticism of the video is perhaps even more important than the video itself, but without the original video there would be no dialogue at all. I think the best case scenario here would be for the dialogue move away from talking about Invisible Children as an organization (it definitely seems flawed at best) towards a discussion based on the actual nuanced facts at hand.

Agreed, especially RE: the criticism of IC's financials, which I feel is unfair. But from what I've read on comment threads around the internet, noone really wants to take on the nuance, and god help you if you bring up how problematic the idea of another western-led campaign to "save Africa" is. But eyes on are eyes on, and god knows, this is more knowledge and publicity than Uganda's ever gotten since Idi Amin (which is another issue, as that's the only way sub-Saharan Africa gets publicity, but that's a whole 'nother discussion). Personally however, I doubt the dialogue will go to any necessary places.

That said, I really must recommend to everyone to check that YouTube video, it's really fantastic.

H.P. Lovesauce wrote:

When we have the opportunity to remove a little bit of evil, isn't that a little bit good?

I think that was written on the box my Colt 1911 came in.

I'm reminded of the scene in Iron Man where Stark, seeing on TV that the thugs that held him are kidnapping and murdering with impunity, takes his suit out on its first real world test. He flies down, shoots all the bad guys, disarms their leader, and leaves him at the mercy of the locals. "He's all yours," he says, then flies away.

That scene right there is America. It's like the distillation of a national psyche. We want to fly in and shoot the horrible people and empower the good-hearted downtrodden locals.

It's a shame it never works like that in the real world. Nothing's ever quite so simple.

Aetius wrote:

The supposed "regional governments" our military units are coordinating aren't any better than the LRA itself.

Oh, so all their leaders are on the International Criminal Court's list of most wanted for crimes against humanity too?

It makes me very sad when we as a world full of people can't even agree to try to stop a guy as evil as Kony, by whatever means.

Yeah, Kony is about as bad as you can get. That being said, my first thought when I started seeing all this going around in the last few days was sub-Saharan Africa has been a hellhole in all sorts of ways for decades; people are just noticing?

BadKen wrote:

It makes me very sad when we as a world full of people can't even agree to try to stop a guy as evil as Kony, by whatever means.

I think we can agree to stop Kony. It's the "by whatever means" that has people shaking their heads.

Quintin_Stone wrote:
BadKen wrote:

It makes me very sad when we as a world full of people can't even agree to try to stop a guy as evil as Kony, by whatever means.

I think we can agree to stop Kony. It's the "by whatever means" that has people shaking their heads.

Aw, crap, I agree with Quintin Stone? My life is f*cking over, man.