Gamer Podcasts

Mr GT Chris wrote:

They have at least 3 full time guys available plus x number of other guys who guest from time to time so saying that they don't have the resources to play and talk about one of the tentpole releases of this fall seems pretty ridiculous.

Actually, no, Kohler is the only person on that podcast who writes about games for a living. The other people work in other divisions of Wired. Any games they talk about are done on their own time.

Also, RE6 is complete garbage, hope that helps.

*shrug* if they had actually played it their opinion that it was garbage might have been worth a damn :p.

demonbox wrote:

Is there a good Dwarf Fortress podcast?

I just feel like plugging Roguelike Radio here. It seems almost developer-focused but has some very smart people on, and if you enjoy roguelikes, they deconstruct them in an interesting way.

Basically if the idea of listening to people talk about hunger systems for an hour sounds like fun, give it a try.

Mr GT Chris wrote:

*shrug* if they had actually played it their opinion that it was garbage might have been worth a damn :p.

Hey now, that's other people's garbage, and it's apparently worth dignifying with a mention.

NormanTheIntern wrote:
demonbox wrote:

Is there a good Dwarf Fortress podcast?

I just feel like plugging Roguelike Radio here. It seems almost developer-focused but has some very smart people on, and if you enjoy roguelikes, they deconstruct them in an interesting way.

Basically if the idea of listening to people talk about hunger systems for an hour sounds like fun, give it a try.

Haha, that's a great sales pitch.

On a side note, Top Score is a great podcast about video game music, and it;s done by a real professional (Emily Reese from Minnesota public radio), so the interviews are great, and there are plenty of clips of good game music. If you like game music, film scoring, composing, or producing, you'll be in to this.

Squee9 wrote:

On a side note, Top Score is a great podcast about video game music, and it;s done by a real professional (Emily Reese from Minnesota public radio), so the interviews are great, and there are plenty of clips of good game music. If you like game music, film scoring, composing, or producing, you'll be in to this.

I just got on board with Top Score last week after it got a shout-out on the local NPR station. A big +1 from me!

NormanTheIntern wrote:
demonbox wrote:

Is there a good Dwarf Fortress podcast?

I just feel like plugging Roguelike Radio here. It seems almost developer-focused but has some very smart people on, and if you enjoy roguelikes, they deconstruct them in an interesting way.

Basically if the idea of listening to people talk about hunger systems for an hour sounds like fun, give it a try.

I like Roguelike Radio quite a bit; they frequently have developers on the show and I always find that interesting.

I especially enjoyed the episode with the dev of .... Cardinal Quest?
More love for Roguelike Radio.

+1 to Top Score and Roguelike Radio. Although, if you're particular about audio quality, I'd skip RR. If it's not a bad audio balance one week, it's a bad connection the next.

psoplayer wrote:

I think I'm losing my mind listening to Weekend Confirmed and not being able to correct them as they rag on Tokyo Jungle for not displaying equipment on your animal during gameplay. (which it totally does) Gah! (and the controller totally does rumble as the mating animation finishes -_-)

I found myself wondering if they had played some pre-release build or something. It seems as if it would be pretty difficult to make this kind of mistake, considering no other podcast I listened to mentioned it.

kuddles wrote:

Kohler

Speaking of Kohler, it made me think of Phil Kollar.

Phil got pretty defensive on Twitter tonight when Jeff Green made a comment about the Polygon group taking themselves a bit too seriously bemoaning the difficulties of reviewing games. Justin McElroy and Patrick Klepek both ended up putting in their two cents as well.

As someone who finds the documentary looking in it's own mirror a bit too deeply, I find the defensiveness a bit off-putting. If you can't take someone saying you seem a bit too serious, maybe you're a bit too serious.

Just reading those tweets make me wonder if some people spend their lives on twitter. I mean, how productive can you possibly be at your regular job if you are writing almost a tweet every couple of minutes (that includes replies). I find it distracting enough when I'm trying to get stuff done and RSS updates and the occasional email pop up. If I tweeted or Facebooked that much it would be all over.

demonbox wrote:
kuddles wrote:

Kohler

Speaking of Kohler, it made me think of Phil Kollar.

Phil got pretty defensive on Twitter tonight when Jeff Green made a comment about the Polygon group taking themselves a bit too seriously bemoaning the difficulties of reviewing games. Justin McElroy and Patrick Klepek both ended up putting in their two cents as well.

As someone who finds the documentary looking in it's own mirror a bit too deeply, I find the defensiveness a bit off-putting. If you can't take someone saying you seem a bit too serious, maybe you're a bit too serious.

[heathledgerjoker.jpg]

If you want to hear people talk about RE6, and liked it, check out this weeks EisT.

Edit: Also the intro and break music is some original stuff by Tech Guy and Kane.

I stopped watching the Polygon documentary a while back. When they first announced it, a lot of people flamed it saying it was pretentious. I thought most of those were overreactions and I still think some people are too up in arms about it but it definitely takes itself way too seriously. It's not like Indie Game: The Movie where they're talking to game makers who are broke and barely scraping by, it's a group backed by a large company who is putting millions of dollars into it. It does seem a little up its own backside to make this well funded endeavour to make a video game web site seem like an art-house struggle.

I can understand that when you're under a hard deadline to write a review, playing a video game goes from being fun to being work and can have all the associated stresses of it. But I do think bemoaning an aspect of the wrong that rightly or wrongly, a lot of people would hack off a limb to have doesn't come across well.

Been hard for me to find another podcast that I like as much as GWJ. I've tried others and it's either their too vulgar or too boring or just ramble on about other stuff besides games. I'm okay with a cuss word here and there, especially if you're talking about something frustrating or passionate, but all the time makes it a little hard to deal with. Seen a couple of mentions on here that I will be willing to try. I've been trying a few here and there lately, and I just haven't seen anything else that I really like. I was also listening to Weekend Confirmed and I think I might go back to them if I can't find anyone else besides GWJ.

Parallax Abstraction wrote:

It's not like Indie Game: The Movie where they're talking to game makers who are broke and barely scraping by, it's a group backed by a large company who is putting millions of dollars into it. It does seem a little up its own backside to make this well funded endeavour to make a video game web site seem like an art-house struggle.

Man, if that's really how the Polygon documentary comes off, I need to avoid it like the plague. I've found a lot of value in their reviews and have occasionally turned to listening to The Besties if I've had a really bad week, as the supreme lameness of some of the jokes never fails to yield a chuckle. Here's what I mean: Indie Game: The Movie, while interesting, had lots of moments where I found the featured devs to be egotistical crybabies when I should have probably felt empathy for them. I'm willing to accept that as my problem, as I'm the one reacting "dude, *everyone* faces the scariness of personal and professional failure daily! quit the snowflake sh*t!"'; at the same time, I don't want to ruin Polygon's current "to-me" value.

DaScorpion wrote:

Been hard for me to find another podcast that I like as much as GWJ. I've tried others and it's either their too vulgar or too boring or just ramble on about other stuff besides games. I'm okay with a cuss word here and there, especially if you're talking about something frustrating or passionate, but all the time makes it a little hard to deal with. Seen a couple of mentions on here that I will be willing to try. I've been trying a few here and there lately, and I just haven't seen anything else that I really like. I was also listening to Weekend Confirmed and I think I might go back to them if I can't find anyone else besides GWJ.

It was already mentioned on the first page, but I'll bring it back up. Tried the Experience Points podcast yet? Just a weekly thirty minute dose of consistently thought-provoking video game discussion; no BS.

psoplayer wrote:
DaScorpion wrote:

Been hard for me to find another podcast that I like as much as GWJ. I've tried others and it's either their too vulgar or too boring or just ramble on about other stuff besides games. I'm okay with a cuss word here and there, especially if you're talking about something frustrating or passionate, but all the time makes it a little hard to deal with. Seen a couple of mentions on here that I will be willing to try. I've been trying a few here and there lately, and I just haven't seen anything else that I really like. I was also listening to Weekend Confirmed and I think I might go back to them if I can't find anyone else besides GWJ.

It was already mentioned on the first page, but I'll bring it back up. Tried the Experience Points podcast yet? Just a weekly thirty minute dose of consistently thought-provoking video game discussion; no BS.

Yes, that is one on my list to try out. Thanks!

ianunderhill wrote:
Parallax Abstraction wrote:

It's not like Indie Game: The Movie where they're talking to game makers who are broke and barely scraping by, it's a group backed by a large company who is putting millions of dollars into it. It does seem a little up its own backside to make this well funded endeavour to make a video game web site seem like an art-house struggle.

Man, if that's really how the Polygon documentary comes off, I need to avoid it like the plague. I've found a lot of value in their reviews and have occasionally turned to listening to The Besties if I've had a really bad week, as the supreme lameness of some of the jokes never fails to yield a chuckle. Here's what I mean: Indie Game: The Movie, while interesting, had lots of moments where I found the featured devs to be egotistical crybabies when I should have probably felt empathy for them. I'm willing to accept that as my problem, as I'm the one reacting "dude, *everyone* faces the scariness of personal and professional failure daily! quit the snowflake sh*t!"'; at the same time, I don't want to ruin Polygon's current "to-me" value.

Since the documentary's free, I would really recommend checking it out for yourself and seeing what you think. I stated my opinion but it's just that and a lot of people probably think differently.

Parallax Abstraction wrote:

Since the documentary's free, I would really recommend checking it out for yourself and seeing what you think. I stated my opinion but it's just that and a lot of people probably think differently.

I'll take that into consideration. Thanks for the push back the other way, though in light of your opinion, I will make it a point to check it out when I'm feeling more...empathically charitable, I guess. Something like that.

Parallax Abstraction wrote:

I can understand that when you're under a hard deadline to write a review, playing a video game goes from being fun to being work and can have all the associated stresses of it. But I do think bemoaning an aspect of the wrong that rightly or wrongly, a lot of people would hack off a limb to have doesn't come across well.

As a freelancer myself, I can attest that writing any review usually takes the fun out of the experience of the material to a certain degree, be it game, book, or movie. It's part of the process, part of the job. But you aren't laying blacktop in a Kentucky heatwave. It isn't arduous. So you feel a little stressed out. Oh, woe.

You made a good point about how they're trying to make Polygon look like 'an art house struggle'. That summed up exactly the disconnect I have with that site.

Well, they've already achieved the arthouse indie ideal of not being able to stick with a name. Are they called Polygon now? I could've sworn it was Verge something. Or was it Vox? Or Mouse Rat? Something like that, anyway.

hbi2k wrote:

Well, they've already achieved the arthouse indie ideal of not being able to stick with a name. Are they called Polygon now? I could've sworn it was Verge something. Or was it Vox? Or Mouse Rat? Something like that, anyway.

They're owned by Vox Media which also owns The Verge and they were The Verge Dot Com Slash Gaming temporarily until Polygon was created which has taken a really long time. It's been a really confusing message but they've intended to be Polygon for quite some time now.

IMAGE(http://cdn.bulbagarden.net/upload/thumb/6/6b/137Porygon.png/180px-137Porygon.png)

Was just messing around with Google and amused to see that "Polygon pretentious" now autocompletes. In fact this is the first link you get:

Polygon And The Documentary That Cured Cancer

Mr GT Chris wrote:

Was just messing around with Google and amused to see that "Polygon pretentious" now autocompletes. In fact this is the first link you get:

Polygon And The Documentary That Cured Cancer

That's an excellent write-up of the issues many (including me to a lesser degree) are having. In the end, it doesn't really matter much and like the author, if the site ends up being good, whether or not their documentary was a little too snooty really doesn't matter much. It does give a weird initial impression though.

Mr GT Chris wrote:

Was just messing around with Google and amused to see that "Polygon pretentious" now autocompletes. In fact this is the first link you get:

Polygon And The Documentary That Cured Cancer

That documentary is just begging for the Giantbomb or Idle Thumbs guys to make a parody of. The message can be,"Yeah we take our jobs and this industry seriously, but c'mon... it's f***ing video games!"

I don't think Polygon would find it funny though.

Parallax Abstraction wrote:

That's an excellent write-up of the issues many (including me to a lesser degree) are having. In the end, it doesn't really matter much and like the author, if the site ends up being good, whether or not their documentary was a little too snooty really doesn't matter much. It does give a weird initial impression though.

It's branding. The big question is, "Does Polygon have the audience it thinks it does?" I don't see what precious, cloying earnestness has to do with games journalism. On the other hand, if you're building a new site that fits into an over-saturated space and you're staffing it with people who used to work on other sites, it's important to justify your existence by pitching yourself as something different. Frankly, I'm sick to death of hearing about how amazing this phantom site is going to be when we finally see it, but on the other hand, the reviews and other content currently being published through The Verge are definitely high-quality. My own preference would've been to see little gap between the pitch and the launch, but maybe that's just impractical to make happen in a working year, where writers need to keep writing because there're still new games; the world just doesn't stop while you build your site. While people are quick to label the documentary stuff pretentious (and it is), just imagine the ire raised by a web media blitz from a bunch of Dew-swilling dudebros building their new gaming site on a foundation of n00b intolerance and tits as big as pizzas.

gore wrote:
ianunderhill wrote:

Frankly, I'm sick to death of hearing about how amazing this phantom site is going to be when we finally see it...

Show, don't tell, guys.

Really, I think we're wanting the same thing here. I'm not defending the documentary stuff (hence use of words like "precious" and "cloying") and I don't understand why you seem to think I am. All I'm saying is that I see why they're trying to make the pitch. I 'm not saying it's effective; I find it ridiculous. But I do think a lot of it has to do with trying to figure out how to put out content to keep everyone active (in craft and visibility) while putting together a new site at the same time. I think it's always a mistake to bill yourself as the second coming, but, person to person, I wonder how many people are reacting to the self-aggrandizing aspect of things versus the actual tone.