NFL 2011 Divisional Playoff Round

Whatever Tebow's gifts are as a leader (and I'm told they are actually pretty substantial), the criticisms about his football judgement and throwing mechanics are very legitimate ones. And throwing mechanics, in particular, aren't the sort of things you are able to develop this late in your professional career. As you say, he might be able to surprise us with his off season development, but there are many better quarterbacks (25 starting in the NFL in fact and 26 if we count in Matt Schaub's short season) and the company he's keeping isn't the sort that look likely to have jobs next year. He finished out the year a half point better in QB rating than Rex Grossman who will likely find himself out of a job. And a full 1.7 points below Colt McCoy. Both the Browns and the Redskins have the sense to recognize that their respective tossers are not the futures of their teams.

Joe Flacco catches all manner of hell for his ineffectiveness when it comes to keeping drives alive. His 57.6% completion percentage is pretty dismal. Even that is stellar compared to Tebow's 46.5% which puts him at the bottom of the list of any quarterback that started at least one game and a full 4.3% below Blaine Gabbert (the next nearest competitor for that dubious honor).

He threw for an average of 123.5 yards per game, which, again puts him at the bottom of the list. Blaine Gabbert managed 147.6 and will almost certainly not have a job next year. His fumbles/lost numbers are almost equally dismal.

For whatever reason you may like him, there are numerous reasons to recognize his tremendous limitations as a professional level quarterback. By any objective measure, he isn't very good.

With my Saints out, I'm rooting for an all-Harbaugh Super Bowl.

I'm just happy that all the dome teams have been eliminated. Artificial turf is an abomination against football.

sheared wrote:

Lots of very reasonable stuff.

That's all stuff I think we can agree on, except of course that Tebow showed signs of potential. I'm not gonna hash out the same arguments on that point though, we've been through them all before

Paleocon wrote:

I'm just happy that all the dome teams have been eliminated. Artificial turf is an abomination against football.

Can't argue with that.

Paleocon wrote:

I'm just happy that all the dome teams have been eliminated. Artificial turf is an abomination against football.

Huh? The Patriots play on FieldTurf. So, get set for more artificial turf...

I get your gist. Maybe we should go with "Climate-controlled fields are an abomination against football."

sheared wrote:

I think Tebow showed signs of potential

As a passer, he has shown no such thing IMO.

I would have to think that anyone who really likes Tebow and also likes really focusing on and dissecting the passing game would have to be heartbroken when watching Tebow.

The reason I say that is, Tebow's got good field smarts, and he usually knows where to go with the ball. And then he physically can not make the throw.

With young quarterbacks, it's usually the other way around. They've got the arm, and have to learn what to do with it.

The reason I hold out so little hope for Tebow as a passer is that I can't think of another QB who has physically lacked the ability to make the necessary throws, and developed them later. Mental development is par for the course for young QBs. But that's not where Tebow's deficiencies lie. (At least, not his biggest ones - he can still get a lot better there too, but he's where a 2nd year QB ought to be).

Tebow completes the 9 wide-open throws defenses give him every game. When a receiver runs a post and gets cleanly underneath his defender, Tebow delivers the ball. Young QBs often struggle with processing information and they miss those throws. Tebow finds every one. That's good on him.

But Tebow has not flashed even one nice quick release throw through a tight, closing window (that I've seen). The real pro throws, the ones that I could point to and say, "see, something's there, maybe they can get it out of him".

But while I see little reason to think Tebow will ever develop true pocket passer skills, I'm not yet completely ruling out the success of the single-wing style run/pass option. It's going to be a lot harder next year - defensive coordinators are going to see how teams like New England blew it apart, and take notes. But Tebow is hard to bring down, and is a good improviser, and making receivers get open by extending plays and having zone discipline break down is a different skill than sitting in the pocket and picking defenses apart. It is a sustainable NFL attack? My gut says no, but I'm not ruling it out entirely yet.

Paleocon wrote:

I'm just happy that all the dome teams have been eliminated. Artificial turf is an abomination against football.

firesloth wrote:

I get your gist. Maybe we should go with "Climate-controlled fields are an abomination against football."

Only if they're keeping out the cold. Football is supposed to be cold. If it's 105 degrees in Texas, close that bitch up and turn on the ice cold air conditioning.

I want domes that make artificial monsoons, artificial Ice Bowls.

I think Tebow has a career as a backup and situational QB. I hope he can turn around his passing game and get an arm because reading stuff like this, http://espn.go.com/espn/story/_/id/7... no one should hate Tebow. He's a good guy and he didn't go out of the way to cause the controversy. He's sincere and that's really important.

Now on to next week, I'm looking forward to my 49er's beating the giants like a drum.

Grumpicus wrote:

With my Saints out, I'm rooting for an all-Harbaugh Super Bowl.

I second this.

I see this two ways:

1) Harbaugh bowl

2) Giants beat the Patriots again.*

Those are my ideal situations.

*Can you imagine how this would affect Peyton? His little brother beat Brady in the Super Bowl ... twice.

If its Giants Pats I'm boycotting like I did in 2007....

what a horrendous display today. Still in shock at how badly they choked.... and continued to choke the whole game through. I'll even be a sore loser and give the Giants hardly any credit cant believe they might make it to the SB considering pass rush vs 49ers seems to be the secret that Baltimore used to win.

Ulairi wrote:

I think Tebow has a career as a backup and situational QB. I hope he can turn around his passing game and get an arm because reading stuff like this, http://espn.go.com/espn/story/_/id/7... no one should hate Tebow. He's a good guy and he didn't go out of the way to cause the controversy. He's sincere and that's really important.

I really don't care about how nice of a kid he is. In fact, Tebow is not really responsible for at least 50% of the reasons I just don't like him.

What's really annoyed me about him in general is that he's apparently now the QB of the future(tm) for the Denver Broncos(also referred to the house that Elway built). Only he can't throw the ball as well as any other starting quarterback in the NFL can. And basically nobody's actually pointing out this fact.

And almost all of the 4th quarter comebacks were due to completely inept opponents and that Denver's receivers were able to find their hands and actually catch the ball.

And the thing that really annoys me about Tebow is the simple fact that Denver was in the playoffs because of one Marion Barber. Who the Bears still haven't cut.

garion333 wrote:

*Can you imagine how this would affect Peyton? His little brother beat Brady in the Super Bowl ... twice.

And in his own house, as the Super Bowl is in Indianapolis this year.

jowner wrote:

If its Giants Pats I'm boycotting like I did in 2007....

You missed one hell of a game then. Not sure why one would boycott that game, I can see the need to boycott the sequel.

jowner wrote:

I'll even be a sore loser and give the Giants hardly any credit :P

I give the refs credit the deficit wasn't bigger

Kush15 wrote:
garion333 wrote:

*Can you imagine how this would affect Peyton? His little brother beat Brady in the Super Bowl ... twice.

And in his own house, as the Super Bowl is in Indianapolis this year.

jowner wrote:

If its Giants Pats I'm boycotting like I did in 2007....

You missed one hell of a game then. Not sure why one would boycott that game, I can see the need to boycott the sequel.

jowner wrote:

I'll even be a sore loser and give the Giants hardly any credit :P

I give the refs credit the deficit wasn't bigger 8-)

Could care less how good that game was. I could not bear watching the Pats go undefeated or pie face manning win the superbowl after beating the Packers.

the reffing was atrocious but I'm sorry not sold on the Giants. Call it sour grapes but a huge portion goes to the Packers for never showing up yesterday. The performance they put in would of got them beaten by maybe every NFL team and some college ones to boot.

Here I'll quickly change the subject and deflect the whole thing by saying that Brady punting on third was pretty gutless. Big smiles and handshake with Bellichek after was the icing.

jowner wrote:
Kush15 wrote:
garion333 wrote:

*Can you imagine how this would affect Peyton? His little brother beat Brady in the Super Bowl ... twice.

And in his own house, as the Super Bowl is in Indianapolis this year.

jowner wrote:

If its Giants Pats I'm boycotting like I did in 2007....

You missed one hell of a game then. Not sure why one would boycott that game, I can see the need to boycott the sequel.

jowner wrote:

I'll even be a sore loser and give the Giants hardly any credit :P

I give the refs credit the deficit wasn't bigger 8-)

Could care less how good that game was. I could not bear watching the Pats go undefeated or pie face manning win the superbowl after beating the Packers.

the reffing was atrocious but I'm sorry not sold on the Giants. Call it sour grapes but a huge portion goes to the Packers for never showing up yesterday. The performance they put in would of got them beaten by maybe every NFL team and some college ones to boot.

Here I'll quickly change the subject and deflect the whole thing by saying that Brady punting on third was pretty gutless. Big smiles and handshake with Bellichek after was the icing.

I think you're really not giving the Giants their due here. They are lucky in that they are peaking at precisely the right time, but you have to admit that they were probably the toughest defense that the Packers played all year.

The Pack barely won the shootout they had with the G-men earlier in the year and the statement that this was all about Green Bay not showing up is not entirely fair. They may not have peaked at the right time, but to degrade the quality of New York's performance because if it just comes across as ingracious.

I'm actually happy with the outcome because it means that we have two teams in the NFC Championship Game that actually have respectable defenses. I drives me crazy to see the rules changes resulting in one dimensional shootout horse races.

I really can't stand any of the teams left... its like worse case scenario for me... The lesser of all evils I guess is SF winning the SB.. I'm not a big fan of Harbaugh's in general but at least Akers would have a SB ring.. and he is an all-around awesome dude.

Paleocon wrote:
jowner wrote:
Kush15 wrote:
garion333 wrote:

*Can you imagine how this would affect Peyton? His little brother beat Brady in the Super Bowl ... twice.

And in his own house, as the Super Bowl is in Indianapolis this year.

jowner wrote:

If its Giants Pats I'm boycotting like I did in 2007....

You missed one hell of a game then. Not sure why one would boycott that game, I can see the need to boycott the sequel.

jowner wrote:

I'll even be a sore loser and give the Giants hardly any credit :P

I give the refs credit the deficit wasn't bigger 8-)

Could care less how good that game was. I could not bear watching the Pats go undefeated or pie face manning win the superbowl after beating the Packers.

the reffing was atrocious but I'm sorry not sold on the Giants. Call it sour grapes but a huge portion goes to the Packers for never showing up yesterday. The performance they put in would of got them beaten by maybe every NFL team and some college ones to boot.

Here I'll quickly change the subject and deflect the whole thing by saying that Brady punting on third was pretty gutless. Big smiles and handshake with Bellichek after was the icing.

I think you're really not giving the Giants their due here. They are lucky in that they are peaking at precisely the right time, but you have to admit that they were probably the toughest defense that the Packers played all year.

The Pack barely won the shootout they had with the G-men earlier in the year and the statement that this was all about Green Bay not showing up is not entirely fair. They may not have peaked at the right time, but to degrade the quality of New York's performance because if it just comes across as ingracious.

I'm actually happy with the outcome because it means that we have two teams in the NFC Championship Game that actually have respectable defenses. I drives me crazy to see the rules changes resulting in one dimensional shootout horse races.

bad reffing aside the Pack were in a game at the start of the 4th they had no business being in so I really have a hard time swallowing that.

They then sealed their own fate with the Finley drop on 3rd and a bad play call on 4th.

It honestly was one of the worst performances I've seen put in by a team that was supposed to be elite.

jowner wrote:
Paleocon wrote:
jowner wrote:
Kush15 wrote:
garion333 wrote:

*Can you imagine how this would affect Peyton? His little brother beat Brady in the Super Bowl ... twice.

And in his own house, as the Super Bowl is in Indianapolis this year.

jowner wrote:

If its Giants Pats I'm boycotting like I did in 2007....

You missed one hell of a game then. Not sure why one would boycott that game, I can see the need to boycott the sequel.

jowner wrote:

I'll even be a sore loser and give the Giants hardly any credit :P

I give the refs credit the deficit wasn't bigger 8-)

Could care less how good that game was. I could not bear watching the Pats go undefeated or pie face manning win the superbowl after beating the Packers.

the reffing was atrocious but I'm sorry not sold on the Giants. Call it sour grapes but a huge portion goes to the Packers for never showing up yesterday. The performance they put in would of got them beaten by maybe every NFL team and some college ones to boot.

Here I'll quickly change the subject and deflect the whole thing by saying that Brady punting on third was pretty gutless. Big smiles and handshake with Bellichek after was the icing.

I think you're really not giving the Giants their due here. They are lucky in that they are peaking at precisely the right time, but you have to admit that they were probably the toughest defense that the Packers played all year.

The Pack barely won the shootout they had with the G-men earlier in the year and the statement that this was all about Green Bay not showing up is not entirely fair. They may not have peaked at the right time, but to degrade the quality of New York's performance because if it just comes across as ingracious.

I'm actually happy with the outcome because it means that we have two teams in the NFC Championship Game that actually have respectable defenses. I drives me crazy to see the rules changes resulting in one dimensional shootout horse races.

bad reffing aside the Pack were in a game at the start of the 4th they had no business being in so I really have a hard time swallowing that.

They then sealed their own fate with the Finley drop on 3rd and a bad play call on 4th.

It honestly was one of the worst performances I've seen put in by a team that was supposed to be elite.

Bad reffing aside? That was 14 points off of "bad reffing aside".

Your assuming points and thats kinda the point. Even with help from the refs they were in the game in the 4th and instead of waking up to any resemblance of how they could play this year they continued to get worse.

edit: if that sounded confusing I mean the Packers were so atrocious they needed ref help and still couldn't wake up.

Paleocon wrote:

Whatever Tebow's gifts are as a leader (and I'm told they are actually pretty substantial), the criticisms about his football judgement and throwing mechanics are very legitimate ones. And throwing mechanics, in particular, aren't the sort of things you are able to develop this late in your professional career. As you say, he might be able to surprise us with his off season development, but there are many better quarterbacks (25 starting in the NFL in fact and 26 if we count in Matt Schaub's short season) and the company he's keeping isn't the sort that look likely to have jobs next year. He finished out the year a half point better in QB rating than Rex Grossman who will likely find himself out of a job. And a full 1.7 points below Colt McCoy. Both the Browns and the Redskins have the sense to recognize that their respective tossers are not the futures of their teams.

Joe Flacco catches all manner of hell for his ineffectiveness when it comes to keeping drives alive. His 57.6% completion percentage is pretty dismal. Even that is stellar compared to Tebow's 46.5% which puts him at the bottom of the list of any quarterback that started at least one game and a full 4.3% below Blaine Gabbert (the next nearest competitor for that dubious honor).

He threw for an average of 123.5 yards per game, which, again puts him at the bottom of the list. Blaine Gabbert managed 147.6 and will almost certainly not have a job next year. His fumbles/lost numbers are almost equally dismal.

For whatever reason you may like him, there are numerous reasons to recognize his tremendous limitations as a professional level quarterback. By any objective measure, he isn't very good.

sheared wasn't arguing with reasonable posts like this. He was arguing with snarky, blame Tebow for everything posts. Tebow gets way too much credit when he wins, and way too much (negative) credit for losing to the Patriots. Yes, he should have scored more against them, but the Broncos defense was arguably worse than the offense that game.

Paleocon wrote:

I'm just happy that all the dome teams have been eliminated. Artificial turf is an abomination against football.

The thing is most of the teams that play on a 'natural surface' have the grass cut so short (probably some kind of NFL regulation) that it might as well be painted dirt.

The Texans play in a retractable dome that uses real grass, btw.

And the Patriots play on artificial grass.

*Legion* wrote:
sheared wrote:

I think Tebow showed signs of potential

As a passer, he has shown no such thing IMO.

I would have to think that anyone who really likes Tebow and also likes really focusing on and dissecting the passing game would have to be heartbroken when watching Tebow.

The reason I say that is, Tebow's got good field smarts, and he usually knows where to go with the ball. And then he physically can not make the throw.

With young quarterbacks, it's usually the other way around. They've got the arm, and have to learn what to do with it.

The reason I hold out so little hope for Tebow as a passer is that I can't think of another QB who has physically lacked the ability to make the necessary throws, and developed them later. Mental development is par for the course for young QBs. But that's not where Tebow's deficiencies lie. (At least, not his biggest ones - he can still get a lot better there too, but he's where a 2nd year QB ought to be).

Tebow completes the 9 wide-open throws defenses give him every game. When a receiver runs a post and gets cleanly underneath his defender, Tebow delivers the ball. Young QBs often struggle with processing information and they miss those throws. Tebow finds every one. That's good on him.

But Tebow has not flashed even one nice quick release throw through a tight, closing window (that I've seen). The real pro throws, the ones that I could point to and say, "see, something's there, maybe they can get it out of him".

But while I see little reason to think Tebow will ever develop true pocket passer skills, I'm not yet completely ruling out the success of the single-wing style run/pass option. It's going to be a lot harder next year - defensive coordinators are going to see how teams like New England blew it apart, and take notes. But Tebow is hard to bring down, and is a good improviser, and making receivers get open by extending plays and having zone discipline break down is a different skill than sitting in the pocket and picking defenses apart. It is a sustainable NFL attack? My gut says no, but I'm not ruling it out entirely yet.

I agree with everything you say. The potential I was referring to was his ability lead game winning drives. During those brief pressure situations, there was a glimmer of hope that something might be in there. The only "tight" pass I've seen him throw are the quick out passes that he threw 3-4 times (over the past 4-5 games (!)).

Next year will be key. I'd certainly put the odds at better than not that he does not make it past next year as the Denver QB. Maybe another team gives him a shot, but I hope he's willing to move to a position where he can make a more consistent impact -- maybe tight end. The Patriots and Saints have shown that it can certainly be a glamour position.

sheared wrote:
*Legion* wrote:
sheared wrote:

I think Tebow showed signs of potential

As a passer, he has shown no such thing IMO.

I would have to think that anyone who really likes Tebow and also likes really focusing on and dissecting the passing game would have to be heartbroken when watching Tebow.

The reason I say that is, Tebow's got good field smarts, and he usually knows where to go with the ball. And then he physically can not make the throw.

With young quarterbacks, it's usually the other way around. They've got the arm, and have to learn what to do with it.

The reason I hold out so little hope for Tebow as a passer is that I can't think of another QB who has physically lacked the ability to make the necessary throws, and developed them later. Mental development is par for the course for young QBs. But that's not where Tebow's deficiencies lie. (At least, not his biggest ones - he can still get a lot better there too, but he's where a 2nd year QB ought to be).

Tebow completes the 9 wide-open throws defenses give him every game. When a receiver runs a post and gets cleanly underneath his defender, Tebow delivers the ball. Young QBs often struggle with processing information and they miss those throws. Tebow finds every one. That's good on him.

But Tebow has not flashed even one nice quick release throw through a tight, closing window (that I've seen). The real pro throws, the ones that I could point to and say, "see, something's there, maybe they can get it out of him".

But while I see little reason to think Tebow will ever develop true pocket passer skills, I'm not yet completely ruling out the success of the single-wing style run/pass option. It's going to be a lot harder next year - defensive coordinators are going to see how teams like New England blew it apart, and take notes. But Tebow is hard to bring down, and is a good improviser, and making receivers get open by extending plays and having zone discipline break down is a different skill than sitting in the pocket and picking defenses apart. It is a sustainable NFL attack? My gut says no, but I'm not ruling it out entirely yet.

I agree with everything you say. The potential I was referring to was his ability lead game winning drives. During those brief pressure situations, there was a glimmer of hope that something might be in there. The only "tight" pass I've seen him throw are the quick out passes that he threw 3-4 times (over the past 4-5 games (!)).

Next year will be key. I'd certainly put the odds at better than not that he does not make it past next year as the Denver QB. Maybe another team gives him a shot, but I hope he's willing to move to a position where he can make a more consistent impact -- maybe tight end. The Patriots and Saints have shown that it can certainly be a glamour position.

Not to dredge up religion, but if he were a true Christian he wouldn't be out seeking glamour and would be perfectly willing to move to a position where he'd be more useful.

Xeknos wrote:
sheared wrote:
*Legion* wrote:
sheared wrote:

I think Tebow showed signs of potential

As a passer, he has shown no such thing IMO.

I would have to think that anyone who really likes Tebow and also likes really focusing on and dissecting the passing game would have to be heartbroken when watching Tebow.

The reason I say that is, Tebow's got good field smarts, and he usually knows where to go with the ball. And then he physically can not make the throw.

With young quarterbacks, it's usually the other way around. They've got the arm, and have to learn what to do with it.

The reason I hold out so little hope for Tebow as a passer is that I can't think of another QB who has physically lacked the ability to make the necessary throws, and developed them later. Mental development is par for the course for young QBs. But that's not where Tebow's deficiencies lie. (At least, not his biggest ones - he can still get a lot better there too, but he's where a 2nd year QB ought to be).

Tebow completes the 9 wide-open throws defenses give him every game. When a receiver runs a post and gets cleanly underneath his defender, Tebow delivers the ball. Young QBs often struggle with processing information and they miss those throws. Tebow finds every one. That's good on him.

But Tebow has not flashed even one nice quick release throw through a tight, closing window (that I've seen). The real pro throws, the ones that I could point to and say, "see, something's there, maybe they can get it out of him".

But while I see little reason to think Tebow will ever develop true pocket passer skills, I'm not yet completely ruling out the success of the single-wing style run/pass option. It's going to be a lot harder next year - defensive coordinators are going to see how teams like New England blew it apart, and take notes. But Tebow is hard to bring down, and is a good improviser, and making receivers get open by extending plays and having zone discipline break down is a different skill than sitting in the pocket and picking defenses apart. It is a sustainable NFL attack? My gut says no, but I'm not ruling it out entirely yet.

I agree with everything you say. The potential I was referring to was his ability lead game winning drives. During those brief pressure situations, there was a glimmer of hope that something might be in there. The only "tight" pass I've seen him throw are the quick out passes that he threw 3-4 times (over the past 4-5 games (!)).

Next year will be key. I'd certainly put the odds at better than not that he does not make it past next year as the Denver QB. Maybe another team gives him a shot, but I hope he's willing to move to a position where he can make a more consistent impact -- maybe tight end. The Patriots and Saints have shown that it can certainly be a glamour position.

Not to dredge up religion, but if he were a true Christian he wouldn't be out seeking glamour and would be perfectly willing to move to a position where he'd be more useful.

Can we not question Tebow's Christianity. You aren't God and I don't think anyone here has the right nor the ability to determine who is or isn't a true Christian. This was his first year and he won the Hiseman playing quarterback.

Ulairi wrote:

This was his first year and he won the Heisman playing quarterback.

So did Eric Crouch and Troy Smith.

Xeknos wrote:
sheared wrote:
*Legion* wrote:
sheared wrote:

I think Tebow showed signs of potential

As a passer, he has shown no such thing IMO.

I would have to think that anyone who really likes Tebow and also likes really focusing on and dissecting the passing game would have to be heartbroken when watching Tebow.

The reason I say that is, Tebow's got good field smarts, and he usually knows where to go with the ball. And then he physically can not make the throw.

With young quarterbacks, it's usually the other way around. They've got the arm, and have to learn what to do with it.

The reason I hold out so little hope for Tebow as a passer is that I can't think of another QB who has physically lacked the ability to make the necessary throws, and developed them later. Mental development is par for the course for young QBs. But that's not where Tebow's deficiencies lie. (At least, not his biggest ones - he can still get a lot better there too, but he's where a 2nd year QB ought to be).

Tebow completes the 9 wide-open throws defenses give him every game. When a receiver runs a post and gets cleanly underneath his defender, Tebow delivers the ball. Young QBs often struggle with processing information and they miss those throws. Tebow finds every one. That's good on him.

But Tebow has not flashed even one nice quick release throw through a tight, closing window (that I've seen). The real pro throws, the ones that I could point to and say, "see, something's there, maybe they can get it out of him".

But while I see little reason to think Tebow will ever develop true pocket passer skills, I'm not yet completely ruling out the success of the single-wing style run/pass option. It's going to be a lot harder next year - defensive coordinators are going to see how teams like New England blew it apart, and take notes. But Tebow is hard to bring down, and is a good improviser, and making receivers get open by extending plays and having zone discipline break down is a different skill than sitting in the pocket and picking defenses apart. It is a sustainable NFL attack? My gut says no, but I'm not ruling it out entirely yet.

I agree with everything you say. The potential I was referring to was his ability lead game winning drives. During those brief pressure situations, there was a glimmer of hope that something might be in there. The only "tight" pass I've seen him throw are the quick out passes that he threw 3-4 times (over the past 4-5 games (!)).

Next year will be key. I'd certainly put the odds at better than not that he does not make it past next year as the Denver QB. Maybe another team gives him a shot, but I hope he's willing to move to a position where he can make a more consistent impact -- maybe tight end. The Patriots and Saints have shown that it can certainly be a glamour position.

Not to dredge up religion, but if he were a true Christian he wouldn't be out seeking glamour and would be perfectly willing to move to a position where he'd be more useful.

Not to try to take this into P&C, but if he were a true Christian, he'd be Christ. Instead he's just a person doing the best that he can. I can only assume that even with all of the good things he has done, he has a special passion to play quarterback, and maybe that's the thing he's going to end up struggling with (or maybe not). Better than than some of the other prideful pursuits that are out there I guess.