The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Catch-All

Since Skyrim is on deep sale today for the Steam Fall Sale, lemme pull over the suggestions for those who are just joining us.

Reddit's list of must-have mods

Current "best" mod manager - Mod Organizer

McIrishJihad wrote:

Since Skyrim is on deep sale today for the Steam Fall Sale, lemme pull over the suggestions for those who are just joining us.

Reddit's list of must-have mods

Current "best" mod manager - Mod Organizer

The reddit mod list is solid, you can also just hit up our own mod thread here.

I can't personally endorse Mod Organizer. I tried it for STEP and found it hard to use and too rough around the edges. It has some neat features, such as merging mod changes from multiple mods, but in the end I went back to Nexus Mod Manager. STEP says that NMM causes problems, but I didn't run into any and I installed nearly every mod STEP recommends. I suggest NMM over Mod Organizer. The rest of this discussion is better handled in the actual Skyrim Mod thread.

+1 to just buying the Legendary Edition, you'll easily get your $13 out of Dawnguard and Dragonborn.

Download via NMM and run BOSS afterwards. That should leave you sorted in most every case.

I work alone, so I never use followers in TES games—it just seems like too much hassle managing an AI's inventory, pathfinding, stealth, etc. Regardless, lots of people like Lydia et al., and I thought this article on New Statesman is a great exploration why:

Dagger in hand the Dragonborn stalks through the shadows, eyes on Necromancer. The Necromancer, for his part, is working away at something on an enchanting table, like they do. The assorted skeleton warriors in the room are comfortably oblivious to the danger, creaking quietly in the torchlight, weapons slung. By the normal run of things the skeletons would provide a screen, protecting the vulnerable mage while he summons more monsters and chucks fireballs around like a dragon with hiccups. In the enclosed space of the cave chaos would ensue, blood would be spilled. Not today though, this is going to be easy, at least easier than Skyrim usually is.

Suddenly an armoured figure barrels into the room - she’s running hunched over in what technically counts as sneaking according to the system of the game, though the result is as close to stealth as driving a car off a cliff is to parallel parking. Sword in hand, shield ready, clad in clanking steel armour, knocking pots and crockery off a table as she passes, apparently oblivious to the skeletons that have all immediately clocked her arrival, as she was oblivious to her previous instruction to wait. Her entrance could not be more awkward if she had toilet paper clinging to an armoured boot. She scuttles across the room, planting herself dutifully in file behind the Dragonborn, a trail of destruction in her wake, as the skeletons draw their swords and the Necromancer turns from his table, his hands bathed in magical flames.

Lydia has arrived.

Gravey wrote:

I work alone, so I never use followers in TES games—it just seems like too much hassle managing an AI's inventory, pathfinding, stealth, etc. Regardless, lots of people like Lydia et al., and I thought this article on New Statesman is a great exploration why:

Dagger in hand the Dragonborn stalks through the shadows, eyes on Necromancer. The Necromancer, for his part, is working away at something on an enchanting table, like they do. The assorted skeleton warriors in the room are comfortably oblivious to the danger, creaking quietly in the torchlight, weapons slung. By the normal run of things the skeletons would provide a screen, protecting the vulnerable mage while he summons more monsters and chucks fireballs around like a dragon with hiccups. In the enclosed space of the cave chaos would ensue, blood would be spilled. Not today though, this is going to be easy, at least easier than Skyrim usually is.

Suddenly an armoured figure barrels into the room - she’s running hunched over in what technically counts as sneaking according to the system of the game, though the result is as close to stealth as driving a car off a cliff is to parallel parking. Sword in hand, shield ready, clad in clanking steel armour, knocking pots and crockery off a table as she passes, apparently oblivious to the skeletons that have all immediately clocked her arrival, as she was oblivious to her previous instruction to wait. Her entrance could not be more awkward if she had toilet paper clinging to an armoured boot. She scuttles across the room, planting herself dutifully in file behind the Dragonborn, a trail of destruction in her wake, as the skeletons draw their swords and the Necromancer turns from his table, his hands bathed in magical flames.

Lydia has arrived.

Hey now, don't be insulting my wife.

Take my wife—please!

Gravey wrote:

Take my wife—please!

Is she still grateful to you for finding that claw?

Demosthenes wrote:
Gravey wrote:

Take my wife—please!

Is she still grateful to you for finding that claw? :lol:

Oh my god yes. 300 hours later. Every time, it's all she can talk about is that damn claw. That's why I never go back home to Lakeview Manor. My kids still love me though, bless those amnesiac little biters.

At times, Skyrim could definitely use a little Fable II, if you know what I mean. (I mean marry someone else, have both wives meet each other, and both angrily divorce me.)

Demosthenes wrote:
Gravey wrote:

I work alone, so I never use followers in TES games—it just seems like too much hassle managing an AI's inventory, pathfinding, stealth, etc. Regardless, lots of people like Lydia et al., and I thought this article on New Statesman is a great exploration why:

Dagger in hand the Dragonborn stalks through the shadows, eyes on Necromancer. The Necromancer, for his part, is working away at something on an enchanting table, like they do. The assorted skeleton warriors in the room are comfortably oblivious to the danger, creaking quietly in the torchlight, weapons slung. By the normal run of things the skeletons would provide a screen, protecting the vulnerable mage while he summons more monsters and chucks fireballs around like a dragon with hiccups. In the enclosed space of the cave chaos would ensue, blood would be spilled. Not today though, this is going to be easy, at least easier than Skyrim usually is.

Suddenly an armoured figure barrels into the room - she’s running hunched over in what technically counts as sneaking according to the system of the game, though the result is as close to stealth as driving a car off a cliff is to parallel parking. Sword in hand, shield ready, clad in clanking steel armour, knocking pots and crockery off a table as she passes, apparently oblivious to the skeletons that have all immediately clocked her arrival, as she was oblivious to her previous instruction to wait. Her entrance could not be more awkward if she had toilet paper clinging to an armoured boot. She scuttles across the room, planting herself dutifully in file behind the Dragonborn, a trail of destruction in her wake, as the skeletons draw their swords and the Necromancer turns from his table, his hands bathed in magical flames.

Lydia has arrived.

Hey now, don't be insulting my wife.

I'm guessing part of the wedding vows included carrying your burdens.

Quintin_Stone wrote:
Demosthenes wrote:
Gravey wrote:

I work alone, so I never use followers in TES games—it just seems like too much hassle managing an AI's inventory, pathfinding, stealth, etc. Regardless, lots of people like Lydia et al., and I thought this article on New Statesman is a great exploration why:

Dagger in hand the Dragonborn stalks through the shadows, eyes on Necromancer. The Necromancer, for his part, is working away at something on an enchanting table, like they do. The assorted skeleton warriors in the room are comfortably oblivious to the danger, creaking quietly in the torchlight, weapons slung. By the normal run of things the skeletons would provide a screen, protecting the vulnerable mage while he summons more monsters and chucks fireballs around like a dragon with hiccups. In the enclosed space of the cave chaos would ensue, blood would be spilled. Not today though, this is going to be easy, at least easier than Skyrim usually is.

Suddenly an armoured figure barrels into the room - she’s running hunched over in what technically counts as sneaking according to the system of the game, though the result is as close to stealth as driving a car off a cliff is to parallel parking. Sword in hand, shield ready, clad in clanking steel armour, knocking pots and crockery off a table as she passes, apparently oblivious to the skeletons that have all immediately clocked her arrival, as she was oblivious to her previous instruction to wait. Her entrance could not be more awkward if she had toilet paper clinging to an armoured boot. She scuttles across the room, planting herself dutifully in file behind the Dragonborn, a trail of destruction in her wake, as the skeletons draw their swords and the Necromancer turns from his table, his hands bathed in magical flames.

Lydia has arrived.

Hey now, don't be insulting my wife.

I'm guessing part of the wedding vows included carrying your burdens.

We really need couple's counseling for her passive aggressiveness.

There is a mod to "fix" Lydia...so she'll say something else.

I went with Aela. She's costing me a fortune in flea collars, but she's got Claudia Christian's voice, so what you gonna do ? Think my steward (Lydia) is getting a bit cheesed off cleaning up after her though.

I married Balimund the blacksmith from Riften. At least he was always available to service my, um, armor.

I married Ysolda from the market/Bannered Mare in Whiterun. It was handy to be married to an aspiring merchant, though she never did buy the Bannered Mare from Hulda.

There was one really awkward conversation. I developed, uh, sudden amnesia during a drinking contest and got engaged to someone else, but didn't remember who. Well, my dear wife even sold me the ring and apparently was the only one who could tell me to whom I'd gotten engaged. It was awkward. I called of the wedding and we never spoke of it again.

Roo wrote:

There is a mod to "fix" Lydia...so she'll say something else. :)

Bethesda also fixed her dialogue with either a patch or one of the DLC packs. I hardly ever hear her say the burdens line anymore, she has a large variety of lines.

Roo wrote:

There is a mod to "fix" Lydia...so she'll say something else. :)

Yeah, that was one of the first mods I installed.

I sacrificed Lydia to some self proclaimed goddess because I couldn't stand to listen to her any more. Glad to hear they fixed that

I don't get the Lydia hate. I like Lydia, she's saved my ass countless times. I've even run into dragonfire just to heal her before. She is and always will be my best companion in Skyrim.

I loved Lydia. The mod was so that I could continue loving Lydia! Though I married Iona because I thought she was better looking.

Marriage is for chumps. It's the single life for me!

I ... I think I did it...

Sure, it might have taken the better part of 20 hours, but I finally got my Skyrim install setup with all 155 recommended STEP mods.

Quintin_Stone wrote:

I loved Lydia. The mod was so that I could continue loving Lydia! Though I married Iona because I thought she was better looking. :D

There are almost certainly mods for that too.

Lydia has just been given to me as a Thane. The world weary way in which she said, "I live to carry your burdens." when I asked her to carry some weapons was priceless.

Edit: Ok, eight more times and it's losing it's charm a little.

Build a house and make her steward - she's safe and always waiting for you at home, you don't have to listen to her. Win-win !

Higgledy wrote:

Lydia has just been given to me as a Thane. The world weary way in which she said, "I live to carry your burdens." when I asked her to carry some weapons was priceless.

Edit: Ok, eight more times and it's losing it's charm a little.

The biggest problem is how that line is so out of place tone-wise with her character.

Marriage is just so badly implemented, I'd recommend against it. I married Lydia because we were always together and I wanted to see what changed. She immediately told me that she was going to open up a little shop to keep herself busy while I was out saving the world. I can also now tell her to make me dinner. That's it. I'd have preferred if they hadn't done anything at all.

I wound up marrying Brelyna Maryon. Can't remember why I picked her anymore.

Higgledy wrote:

Lydia has just been given to me as a Thane. The world weary way in which she said, "I live to carry your burdens." when I asked her to carry some weapons was priceless.

Edit: Ok, eight more times and it's losing it's charm a little.

This is what the Lydia mod fixes. Stops her from saying this line altogether.

Roo wrote:
Higgledy wrote:

Lydia has just been given to me as a Thane. The world weary way in which she said, "I live to carry your burdens." when I asked her to carry some weapons was priceless.

Edit: Ok, eight more times and it's losing it's charm a little.

This is what the Lydia mod fixes. Stops her from saying this line altogether.

Unfortunately I'm on 360 but I've played Dragon's Dogma. I'm immune to repetitive and irritation dialogue.

/twitch

I have a disproportionate love of snowy landscapes in video games and had a the best time last night just riding my psychopathic horse through a snowbound forest, hearing only the distant huffing and puffing of Lydia running to keep up.

I've started a new character after finally installing the alternate start mod. I've always wanted to try a character who never communicates with other humanoids, so she's going to be my sociophobic and slightly homicidal "raised by wolves" wood elf character. I intend to build up a bounty for all the major cities so they chase me off by default. I'll only craft when I find the relevant crafting station in a dungeon. I've banned myself from the interior large city areas, but I'll probably let myself sneak into the smaller towns like Falkreath if I need to steal supplies or use their forge.

Fun so far, but it might get tedious eventually. At that point I might decide my character finally snaps and will start trying to depopulate Skyrim. One nice thing though, being free of the need for money or carrying stuff to later sell is very liberating. My inventory is nearly always free of clutter!