Wait, interstate TSA checkpoints now, too?

Now the TSA is going through your personal items and making rude comments.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/10/tsa-vibrator/

I swear on my next flight I'm packing the largest dildo I can find along with porn and force them to deal with their discomfort. Hate the TSA.

EDIT: Since the government has no qualms about publicly shaming citizens why should we fear the reverse?

Dear Home,

You make me sad, embarrassed, and relieved to be within gentler, more sensible borders.

Love,
One of your emigrates

Amoebic wrote:

Dear Home,

You make me sad, embarrassed, and relieved to be within gentler, more sensible borders.

Love,
One of your emigrates

Where are you? My wife and I are looking for a more sane landing point someday.

Every authoritarian step is accompanied by cries of "Well we're not there yet" and "At least we're more free than country X."

I have always been subject to rather strict (according to most) security screenings over the years. However, as I am a military type that travels the known world for fun and profit (lol) I can expect such things. Yeah yeah, you always hear about the guy who shipped and entire battle fleet or something in the mail over the course of 20+ years but that is a rather rare occurrence.

I do not condone the rather rampant excess of "security" that we are seeing within our own borders however. Kinda that whole "protecting decent (hopefully) innocent people" thing and "living in a shiathole for 18 months to protect my fellow law-abiding man/woman" ideal just to prevent such occurrences from needing to be established.

Long live the Empire!

DSGamer wrote:
Amoebic wrote:

Dear Home,

You make me sad, embarrassed, and relieved to be within gentler, more sensible borders.

Love,
One of your emigrates

Where are you? My wife and I are looking for a more sane landing point someday.

To be perfectly honest, I've been considering emigrating for a while, but it seems like an insurmountable process unless you have money to handle it with.

DSGamer wrote:
Amoebic wrote:

Dear Home,

You make me sad, embarrassed, and relieved to be within gentler, more sensible borders.

Love,
One of your emigrates

Where are you? My wife and I are looking for a more sane landing point someday.

Oh, Canada.

Amoebic wrote:
DSGamer wrote:
Amoebic wrote:

Dear Home,

You make me sad, embarrassed, and relieved to be within gentler, more sensible borders.

Love,
One of your emigrates

Where are you? My wife and I are looking for a more sane landing point someday.

Oh, Canada.

We might have to go to PM for this. I'm always curious how people manage this. In terms of finding jobs, visas, etc. In spite of Canada being behind on Netflix and having pricier games there's a part of me that would definitely love to try that out.

If you have ancestors that came over from Europe (Ireland and Italy spring to mind) in the early 20th century you may qualify for dual citizenship. I'm currently working on my citizenship with Italy via my great grandfather.

some other zach wrote:

If you have ancestors that came over from Europe (Ireland and Italy spring to mind) in the early 20th century you may qualify for dual citizenship. I'm currently working on my citizenship with Italy via my great grandfather.

My great great grandmother came to America from the Czech republic in the early 1900s.

DSGamer wrote:

We might have to go to PM for this. I'm always curious how people manage this. In terms of finding jobs, visas, etc. In spite of Canada being behind on Netflix and having pricier games there's a part of me that would definitely love to try that out.

If it sweetens the pot any, ever since our dollar hit par with yours, we don't have the pricier games anymore. Netflix here does suck though.

Quintin_Stone wrote:

Every authoritarian step is accompanied by cries of "Well we're not there yet" and "At least we're more free than country X."

And countless cries of "Wolf! Wolf!"

My grandfather was French Canadian. Do I qualify for Canadian immigration?

DSGamer wrote:

My great great grandmother came to America from the Czech republic in the early 1900s.

I'm not sure how dual citizenship with Czechoslovakia works but according to this wiki it's not allowed, even though Martina Navratilova has it. Her case further complicates issues since, as far as I understand, citizenship of your former county is forfeited upon the US granting citizenship. The US only recognizes DC if a person was born a US citizen then acquires citizenship from a second country under that country's laws. Confused? I am.

The wiki also statets that Czechoslovakia, like Italy and Ireland, follows Jus sanguinis (right of blood). For example: My grand father was born in the US to Italian parents before his father attempted to naturalize so under Italian law he's a male* Italian citizen born abroad. Jus sanguinis states that this citizenship is passed down through his lineage.

A friend of mine went through the same process about a decade ago to acquire his dual citizenship with Ireland.

I guess the best you can do is research to see if it's allowed and then figure out if any direct family ancestor was born in the US prior to his or her parents naturalization.

*Female Italian citizens can't pass citizenship if born prior to 1948.

some other zach wrote:
DSGamer wrote:

My great great grandmother came to America from the Czech republic in the early 1900s.

I'm not sure how dual citizenship with Czechoslovakia works but according to this wiki it's not allowed, even though Martina Navratilova has it. Her case further complicates issues since, as far as I understand, citizenship of your former county is forfeited upon the US granting citizenship. The US only recognizes DC if a person was born a US citizen then acquires citizenship from a second country under that country's laws. Confused? I am.

When you take the US naturalization oath you swear to "absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen". So technically you've renounced any other citizenships when you do this. But in practicality (and the US government does understand this) other countries for the most part still consider the person to be one of their citizens and treat them accordingly, unless they've taken steps with the home country to formally relinquish their citizenship. So many naturalized citizens are not considered dual by either country, but still have to function as though they are. (Canada does not have a line like this in their oath, so naturalized Canadians, from the Canadian government's point of view, unquestionably retain any former citizenships.)

If you are a US citizen by birth, your citizenship is not revoked if you become (or are found to already be) a citizen of another country. You would actually have to go relinquish your citizenship in front of the proper peoples. (But swearing allegiance to another country could call it into question, so it's not a bad idea to swear out some kind of affidavit that you intend to remain a US citizen with its associated rights and responsibilites, yadda yadda, just to stay on high ground.)

If a country doesn't allow dual citizenship, like Czechoslovakia, that usually doesn't mean you have to promise to give up your original nationality... it just means that they will ignore any others you may hold and you don't get any special treatment. So no getting out of military duty if there's conscription, no appealing to the US consulate if you're arrested, etc. Many countries (most notoriously Middle Eastern ones, but plenty of others) have this policy. But if you have to swear a naturalization oath and it has a line like the US one... attorney time!

Can't hurt to look into it, though. If you have the right to an EU passport, that's certainly not a bad thing. Irish citizenship based on geneaology is technically citizenship by "registration", not naturalization, so the oath issue is moot. Other EU countries might be the same.

By the way, are we sure these things about Czechoslovakia are true since that country no longer exists?

Weird situation. My family being from Czechoslovakia now that it's the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Yeah, I'm not sure why I wrote that. But sub the two for the expired one, and it still stands.

I had a (Slavic Studies) professor in uni that thought "the Czech Republic" was too awkward, and we should all call it "Czecho". He lamented that it didn't seem to catch on. But he was more of a Slovak specialist, so I think he was content to laugh over the name either way

Goddamn that is some serious Newspeak. "We weren't running checkpoints", and then they explain that they were, in fact, running checkpoints. Their sole basis of claim seems to be that they weren't actually groping drivers; they let the Tennessee cops do that.

Blogger Bob, and I mean this absolutely seriously, would qualify to apply as the Iraqi Information Minister.

Malor wrote:

Goddamn that is some serious Newspeak. "We weren't running checkpoints", and then they explain that they were, in fact, running checkpoints. Their sole basis of claim seems to be that they weren't actually groping drivers; they let the Tennessee cops do that.

Blogger Bob, and I mean this absolutely seriously, would qualify to apply as the Iraqi Information Minister.

My favorite part is the line "TSA officers did not physically screen drivers during this exercise as erroneously reported. The actual vehicle inspections were conducted by the Tennessee State Highway Patrol just the same as they are done every day."

Well no, actually, usually they are only done with probable cause. Idiots.

Malor wrote:

Goddamn that is some serious Newspeak. "We weren't running checkpoints", and then they explain that they were, in fact, running checkpoints. Their sole basis of claim seems to be that they weren't actually groping drivers; they let the Tennessee cops do that.

Blogger Bob, and I mean this absolutely seriously, would qualify to apply as the Iraqi Information Minister.

Blogger Bob has long been known as a propaganda tool and/or a notorious liar.

Back in 2008, he righteously claimed that the images garnered from the body scanners at the airport were innocuous enough to be on the cover of Reader's Digest and be handed out at the local preschool.

Then, detailed photos got released and at Miami International Airport, a TSA agent walking through one of the scanners was harassed by his coworkers for having a small penis to the point where he pummeled one of them. That was followed by one of the higher ups at the TSA admitting the images were very graphic and that there was very little to leave to the imagination.

To this day, Blogger Bob has yet to admit he lied or that he was simply some spokeshole that didn't have a clue as to what he was talking about but just passing along the information.

Malor wrote:

Goddamn that is some serious Newspeak. "We weren't running checkpoints", and then they explain that they were, in fact, running checkpoints. Their sole basis of claim seems to be that they weren't actually groping drivers; they let the Tennessee cops do that.

Blogger Bob, and I mean this absolutely seriously, would qualify to apply as the Iraqi Information Minister.

Actually, the vehicle inspections in this case were done at weigh stations. All trucks have to stop at these weigh stations which are run (depending on the state) by highway patrol or DMV enforcement (sometimes these are one and the same). If weigh stations are considered checkpoints, then we've had national checkpoints around for decades.

Quintin_Stone wrote:
Malor wrote:

Goddamn that is some serious Newspeak. "We weren't running checkpoints", and then they explain that they were, in fact, running checkpoints. Their sole basis of claim seems to be that they weren't actually groping drivers; they let the Tennessee cops do that.

Blogger Bob, and I mean this absolutely seriously, would qualify to apply as the Iraqi Information Minister.

Actually, the vehicle inspections in this case were done at weigh stations. All trucks have to stop at these weigh stations which are run (depending on the state) by highway patrol or DMV enforcement (sometimes these are one and the same). If weigh stations are considered checkpoints, then we've had national checkpoints around for decades.

I guess it comes down to weigh stations being used as weigh stations are not checkpoints, but weigh stations being used as a place to get to second base, that makes them checkpoints even if the sign says "weigh station."

Quintin_Stone wrote:
Malor wrote:

Goddamn that is some serious Newspeak. "We weren't running checkpoints", and then they explain that they were, in fact, running checkpoints. Their sole basis of claim seems to be that they weren't actually groping drivers; they let the Tennessee cops do that.

Blogger Bob, and I mean this absolutely seriously, would qualify to apply as the Iraqi Information Minister.

Actually, the vehicle inspections in this case were done at weigh stations. All trucks have to stop at these weigh stations which are run (depending on the state) by highway patrol or DMV enforcement (sometimes these are one and the same). If weigh stations are considered checkpoints, then we've had national checkpoints around for decades.

They were also done at a couple bus stops.

Minarchist wrote:

They were also done at a couple bus stops.

Yes, that's true.

DSGamer wrote:
Amoebic wrote:
DSGamer wrote:

Where are you? My wife and I are looking for a more sane landing point someday.

Oh, Canada.

We might have to go to PM for this. I'm always curious how people manage this.

Ameobic did the same as I did, but in the other direction - married a 'furriner', and got into their country on account of being their spouse. Probably not a whole lot of use to you as an immigration technique, I imagine. :p And not that I'm for a moment suggesting that either of us did it for immigration purposes over love, of course.

In terms of the dual-citizenship question - here's what I know about it (and I could be wrong). If and when I take US citizenship, I have to swear, scout's honour, to the US, that I renounce my British citizenship. However, there is literally no mechanism by which I can actually renounce my British citizenship to the UK government. So I would end up with dual nationality by default.

Jonman wrote:

In terms of the dual-citizenship question - here's what I know about it (and I could be wrong). If and when I take US citizenship, I have to swear, scout's honour, to the US, that I renounce my British citizenship. However, there is literally no mechanism by which I can actually renounce my British citizenship to the UK government. So I would end up with dual nationality by default.

That's correct. Same applies to me as a Canadian living in the US. Currently I'm on a green card and have been debating going for citizenship.

DSGamer wrote:

We might have to go to PM for this. I'm always curious how people manage this. In terms of finding jobs, visas, etc. In spite of Canada being behind on Netflix and having pricier games there's a part of me that would definitely love to try that out.

Canada actually has a nice, simple form that you can fill out to find out if you qualify for immigration, located here: https://www.canadavisa.com/assess/ca...

Serengeti wrote:
DSGamer wrote:

We might have to go to PM for this. I'm always curious how people manage this. In terms of finding jobs, visas, etc. In spite of Canada being behind on Netflix and having pricier games there's a part of me that would definitely love to try that out.

Canada actually has a nice, simple form that you can fill out to find out if you qualify for immigration, located here: https://www.canadavisa.com/assess/ca...

Slick. I've always found the Canadian immigration process, as far as I've scrutinized it, to be a lot more straightforward than ours. It's a little embarrassing for a country that supposedly stakes so much of its identity on immigration and on being the so-called "melting pot".

(That's a private attorney-run site, though, not a Canadian government one.)