Wait, interstate TSA checkpoints now, too?

I dont think this will last long. THP used to do this setup where they would funnel people off of the interstate from an exit and then before letting them back on do the normal traffic stop. People took them to court and found that this process was illegal and was forced to stop.

Of course this is TSA and they tend to get away with anything regardless.

Edwin wrote:
So they know it wrong, and ruled in previous court cases to be wrong and yet they are still doing it.

Same thing happened there as well?

Ugh... I live in Knoxville and my brothers, mother are strung out between here and Nashville.

The holidays are going to oh so much fun this year.

Edwin wrote:
It's not just the TSA.

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"We're doing everything by the book," Genesee County Undersheriff Christopher Swanson said. "We think there's major loads (of drugs) coming through here from all over, every day. And this is one of the tools we use -- narcotics checkpoints."

The practice has legal experts on searches and seizures at two law schools in Michigan, a constitutional law expert in Lansing and the American Civil Liberties Union calling the practice out of bounds and out of touch with state and U.S. Supreme Court rulings that ban such practices.

Based on a case out of Indianapolis, the U.S. Supreme Court held in 2000 that narcotics checkpoints where everyone gets stopped on a public road are not legal and violate Fourth Amendment protections against illegal searches and seizures, professor David Moran at the University of Michigan Law School said.

Wayne State University Law School professor Peter Henning said police can set up roadblocks to search all who pass by, but only if a crime has just been committed.

And Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton, who said he was not consulted by Pickell about the checkpoints, said that after a court challenge, the Michigan Supreme Court ruled in 1990 that so-called "sobriety check lanes," put in place to nab drunken drivers, were illegal.

So they know it wrong, and ruled in previous court cases to be wrong and yet they are still doing it.

Wait, wasn't Michigan one of the states that said that sobriety checkpoints are illegal? How does this work?

I was recently pulled over outside of Detroit because a police officer "though he smelled pot coming from my open window" according to the officer.

A) My window was up.

B) I was driving 45 mph and the police car had to speed to catch up to me to put the lights on.

C) There was a ton of other cars around me.

D) This goes without saying but I wasn't smoking and have never smoked in that car.

I was even with my wife and we were boggled. I was asked to step out of the car and I was frisked and then my car was searched. THis is all due to a police officer "smelling pot" from a car that was travelling at 45 mph with the window shut travelling far ahead of the car that would eventually pull me over.

It was bullsh*t and when my wife and I got out of the car I maintained a pleasant but very professional facade. The cop seemed uncomfortable and when my wife was like "they aren't going to frisk me too are they?" I was like "NO HONEY I WOULDN"T WORRY ABOUT THAT" and the police politely concurred with me.

The whole thing was definitely off-putting to me but the officer who pulled us over seemed to know that he f*cked up and was very cordial and brief for the remainder of the stop.

Still, I think him pulling us over on those grounds was bullsh*t in the first place.

Maybe this "checkpoint" stuff is already "unofficially" being practiced by police departments. Everyone should download "This American Life" this week for a peek into how many departments are run.

How are they even staffing checkpoints? I thought Flint had like twelve cops left. I guess Genesee County's bankrolling the whole project?

Love it. The rich outer burbs are helpfully financing illegal traffic stops in their broke-ass county seat. Can't afford actual justice there, so I guess this is the next best thing.

TheArtOfScience wrote:
Maybe this "checkpoint" stuff is already "unofficially" being practiced by police departments. Everyone should download "This American Life" this week for a peek into how many departments are run.

I have a strong feeling that the only difference is that it is happening to white people now. Driving while brown has been a problem in this country for years. Maybe I'm out of touch, but if I can believe what other folks are saying, this kind of flimsy pretext for searching has been a standard practice in minority areas.

TheArtOfScience wrote:
I was recently pulled over outside of Detroit because a police officer "though he smelled pot coming from my open window" according to the officer.

A) My window was up.

B) I was driving 45 mph and the police car had to speed to catch up to me to put the lights on.

C) There was a ton of other cars around me.

D) This goes without saying but I wasn't smoking and have never smoked in that car.

I was even with my wife and we were boggled. I was asked to step out of the car and I was frisked and then my car was searched. THis is all due to a police officer "smelling pot" from a car that was travelling at 45 mph with the window shut travelling far ahead of the car that would eventually pull me over.

It was bullsh*t and when my wife and I got out of the car I maintained a pleasant but very professional facade. The cop seemed uncomfortable and when my wife was like "they aren't going to frisk me too are they?" I was like "NO HONEY I WOULDN"T WORRY ABOUT THAT" and the police politely concurred with me.

The whole thing was definitely off-putting to me but the officer who pulled us over seemed to know that he f*cked up and was very cordial and brief for the remainder of the stop.

Still, I think him pulling us over on those grounds was bullsh*t in the first place.

Maybe this "checkpoint" stuff is already "unofficially" being practiced by police departments. Everyone should download "This American Life" this week for a peek into how many departments are run.

I have to believe that, while it probably would've caused more problems than it was worth, that you could've responded with "Officer, I am not going to consent to you violating my rights on a probable cause statement that will not hold up in a court of law."

Of course that is how most police work is done...making it inconvenient to not go along with the cops.

Nevin73 wrote:
I have to believe that, while it probably would've caused more problems than it was worth, that you could've responded with "Officer, I am not going to consent to you violating my rights on a probable cause statement that will not hold up in a court of law."

Is it bad that I laughed? I am Jack's downfall of society.

Yeah, he could have. And yeah, it likely would have.

Nevin73 wrote:
I have to believe that, while it probably would've caused more problems than it was worth, that you could've responded with "Officer, I am not going to consent to you violating my rights on a probable cause statement that will not hold up in a court of law."

Unfortunately, that's not where the conversation is taking place.

I thought about making a stand but I had nothing to hide and I had my wife with me. If I was alone....maybe.

The thing is, I've made those stands before. I had one police officer say to me, "I don't give a f*ck about your constitutional rights. I uphold the law in this township and that means if you knock on one more door I'm going to arrest you."

I was canvassing at the time for an enviornmental group and what I was doing is 100% protected by the constitution yet our organization had a policy of "don't cause a scene". Some cops were cool and would ask me to stop and I would assert that it was my right and they would threaten to arrest me so I would give in but the police were at least decent to me and dropped me off somewhere to get coffee while I waited for everyone else to finish. Other cops would get so angry when I questioned their authority to stop me that they would get all red in the face and spittle would fly from their lips.

The officer who told me he didn't give a f*ck about my rights was acting like he was about to punch me. I respectfully told him that I intended no disrespect but I was simply doing my job. I then advised him that I was not going to knock on any more doors and if he either detained me or physically molested me in any way I would not hesitate to defend my rights and seek reparations in court.

He left me alone but not after getting literally nose to nose with me (not smart for the cop I don't know why he was trying to physically intimidate me which seems like poor policework) and yelling like a dumbass.

I was also held overnight in Ohio because someone left their bowl (not the kind you eat cereal from) on a desk in a dorm I was staying in during a convention. Two good ole' boys wasted about 5 hours of my time as they continually said "we know it was yours" and I kept replying "prove it, my door was open and you found nothing on my person". They just wouldn't stop. They tried looming over me and telling me it wasn't a big deal and just about ever asinine good cop/bad cop trick in the book. Eventually this sergeant came, asked what the hell was going on, and when I told him he disgustedly told the two officers to stop wasting everyone's time and then he uncuffed me. Word to the wise...don't leave your door open during a conference.

I should also temper this by saying the police have saved my ass on a couple occasions as well. I sure do have a lot of police stories though. This is just tip of the iceberg.

H.P. Lovesauce wrote:
On topic, I was in Iowa and they pulled everydamnbody off the Interstate and onto a weigh station. They checked headlights, looked in cars. I believe the term for this is "a big ol' fishin' expedition."

I'm curious, was this a recent thing? I've never seen a checkpoint in all the years I've lived in Iowa, and I always figured that kind of thing didn't happen here.

TheArtOfScience wrote:

I should also temper this by saying the police have saved my ass on a couple occasions as well. I sure do have a lot of police stories though. This is just tip of the iceberg.

Moar?

The only time I got stopped for suspected drunk driving was when I drove for 12 hours from Charleston, SC to Washington, DC after having played in a grueling 3 day hockey tournament. I barely made it and was struggling to stay awake. Thankfully, the Virginia State Trooper was pretty cool about it after running my tags and checking for warrants. When I explained the situation, he even escorted me to the Legion Bridge (the Maryland border).

In fact I've never had a bad police experience. Perhaps it's because I'm Asian and look like a cop.

I guess the cops have a point. Authorities say 87-year-old Indiana man stopped with 104 bricks of cocaine on Mich. interstate. j.mp/vcpzW6

I've got to ask, why are we still ramping up security? Have there been any attacks I didn't know about?

LobsterMobster wrote:
I've got to ask, why are we still ramping up security? Have there been any attacks I didn't know about?

Because $$$$

LobsterMobster wrote:
I've got to ask, why are we still ramping up security? Have there been any attacks I didn't know about?

I'm sure they would respond with "that's because we're doing our job" or something like that. The lack of attacks only lends credibility to their actions, in a fantasy world kind of way.

gregrampage wrote:
LobsterMobster wrote:
I've got to ask, why are we still ramping up security? Have there been any attacks I didn't know about?

I'm sure they would respond with "that's because we're doing our job" or something like that. The lack of attacks only lends credibility to their actions, in a fantasy world kind of way.

In other news, I've recently opened a second factory to increase production of my Tiger Repellent rocks. Demand is sky rocketing due to proof that the Tiger repellent rocks have worked fantastically well in 49 states.

In Ohio, of course, there was a recent surge in Tiger activity. I'd like to remind everyone that the War on Tigers is not something that you can win. It is a constant, never ending struggle against the Tigers that want to end our way of life. And we are going to win it. Recent events show that that it's more important to own Tiger Repellent rocks than ever before.

Yonder wrote:
gregrampage wrote:
LobsterMobster wrote:
I've got to ask, why are we still ramping up security? Have there been any attacks I didn't know about?

I'm sure they would respond with "that's because we're doing our job" or something like that. The lack of attacks only lends credibility to their actions, in a fantasy world kind of way.

In other news, I've recently opened a second factory to increase production of my Tiger Repellent rocks. Demand is sky rocketing due to proof that the Tiger repellent rocks have worked fantastically well in 49 states.

In Ohio, of course, there was a recent surge in Tiger activity. I'd like to remind everyone that the War on Tigers is not something that you can win. It is a constant, never ending struggle against the Tigers that want to end our way of life. And we are going to win it. Recent events show that that it's more important to own Tiger Repellent rocks than ever before.

I find that, since I passed 40, I no longer need cougar repelling socks.

I've never needed cougar repelling socks. Why would you want to repel a nice, er, cat like that?

Once you hit 40 are they really cougars anymore? Wouldn't they just be "women your age"?

IMAGE(http://www.mascotdesign.com/_dev/images/famous-cartoon-character-calvin-hobbes.gif)
Nevar Forget!

Not too long ago, I remember being scorned and poopoohed by people who supported airline checkpoints.

"But we're Americans, we have the right to travel!"

"Well you don't have the right to fly. That's a privilege. If you don't want checkpoints, take the train or drive."

Well, lo and behold, just like the civil libertarians warned, the checkpoints are now on the freeways.

I've got to ask, why are we still ramping up security? Have there been any attacks I didn't know about?

On the national level, the next leg down in the economic collapse is coming, and they're getting ready.

I don't think the states are that smart, they're probably just doing what bureaucracies always do, expand their remit into new areas. Bureaucrats that DON'T constantly try to expand their fiefdoms are outcompeted by those that do.

Malor wrote:
Not too long ago, I remember being scorned and poopoohed by people who supported airline checkpoints.

"But we're Americans, we have the right to travel!"

"Well you don't have the right to fly. That's a privilege. If you don't want checkpoints, take the train or drive."

Well, lo and behold, just like the civil libertarians warned, the checkpoints are now on the freeways.

Well, if you don't like it, you can always ride your bike or walk!

Checkpoints on the sidewalks! Just you wait!

Actually, I heard there was one checkpoint of questionable legality somewhere in Maine, that means it's already happening.

Right, and since checkpoints in airports didn't infringe on my liberty or freedom to travel, obviously checkpoints on roads can't, either.

Oh sure it's already happening -- the TSA staked out a bus stop awhile ago, and they make it 'legal' by putting up signs telling people to go into the bus station, and once they were inside, they were forcibly searched. They lost the ability to opt out of the search as soon as they followed directions on the signs and entered the building.

Of course, this mostly only inconvenienced minorities, so it barely made a blip on the national news.

And note that, at this point, it is completely 100% legal for them to declare you a terrorist and shoot you dead for refusing to be searched at one of these stops.

I doubt they'll actually DO that yet, but it is now quite legal.

Serengeti wrote:
H.P. Lovesauce wrote:
On topic, I was in Iowa and they pulled everydamnbody off the Interstate and onto a weigh station. They checked headlights, looked in cars. I believe the term for this is "a big ol' fishin' expedition."

I'm curious, was this a recent thing? I've never seen a checkpoint in all the years I've lived in Iowa, and I always figured that kind of thing didn't happen here.

This was in mid-June of 2001. It was several hours between Buttf*ck and Pleasantville, I believe. There were wheatfields nearby.

DSGamer wrote:
Now the TSA is going through your personal items and making rude comments.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/10/tsa-vibrator/

I swear on my next flight I'm packing the largest used, unclean dildo I can find along with porn and forcing them to deal with their discomfort. Hate the TSA.

FTFY..

H.P. Lovesauce wrote:
Serengeti wrote:
H.P. Lovesauce wrote:
On topic, I was in Iowa and they pulled everydamnbody off the Interstate and onto a weigh station. They checked headlights, looked in cars. I believe the term for this is "a big ol' fishin' expedition."

I'm curious, was this a recent thing? I've never seen a checkpoint in all the years I've lived in Iowa, and I always figured that kind of thing didn't happen here.

This was in mid-June of 2001. It was several hours between Buttf*ck and Pleasantville, I believe. There were wheatfields nearby.

Ah, couldn't have been Iowa then, nothing but corn here