Eeek! Running out of books to read! Help!

Just finished Brandon Sanderson's Kingmaker book 1 again, after reading through my collection of his works for the second time.. So, anyone have a good recommendation on someone who writes in a similar manner? I need some new authors with big books :S

For reference, series I've read so far, in rough chronological order:

- GRRM Song of Ice & Fire
- All Lois McMaster Bujold books
- Robert Jordan's WoT series (and the few Conan ones too)
- Elizabeth Moon's Honour Harrington books
- Terry Goodking Sword of Truth series
- Most Tad Williams books

I'd really like to find something like the Kingmaker series - your basic plot of regular guy finds out he's special, needs to save the world from ultimate destruction somehow, etc. But enhanced with good writing and original plot! I'm itching to get my hands on another set of books I can lay on my Kindle

IMAGE(http://images.cheezburger.com/completestore/2011/6/20/1b07aeb4-bd6d-488c-a437-d2aa7e9a962b.jpg)

Have you ever read any of the Thomas Covenant books by Stephen R Donaldson? You might also like Lord of the Isles by David Drake.

Maybe the Assassin's series by Robin Hobb? Or The Magician series by Raymond E Feist?

For what you're asking for Feist's Magician series fits the bill nicely, I'll also throw a vote behind Stephen Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant.

Both Feist and Donaldson write in a dense style along the lines of GRRM and Jordan if you're looking for an Author with similar style but stripped down fast paced prose I'd recommend anything by David Gemmell, most his books are self contained one offs that have loose ties to the other books, but there is no real bad entry point. I'd recommend Legend, his first book as a good start, or the Rigante series starting with Sword in the Storm for a denser series of four books.

I am currently reading the Ender's Game Series. It's kinda hard to follow, and he wrote like parallaxes and other things but overall, it's great.

This is obviously a trick. Running out of reading material is impossible.

wordsmythe wrote:

This is obviously a trick. Running out of reading material is impossible.

My book pile is even bigger than my game pile. This may be one of the best problems ever.

Rather than make any recommendations, I'll just link Patrick Rothfuss's posts that have huge lists of books. That's just a search result page so you'll have to scroll down past that Jim Butcher interview post on top.

AnimeJ wrote:

Check here.

Yes. Let's not have a separate book recommendation thread for each person who runs out of books, please.

I'm sorry you had to read the Sword of Truth series.

It's a bit of a switch but Lev Grossman's The Magicians is wonderful. Also, not high fantasy, but Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon is a great read and has a bit of that "Average Joe Saves the World" feel.

I love Thomas Covenant, but be aware that Donaldson hates his characters. Like, a lot.

Also, try Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy. It's good stuff.

Lol the first post in the Book Recommendations thread is Grenn crabbing about yet another book thread. I'm sorry Grenn! And sad about the SoT series; it started out pretty good but ended up sermonizing way too much by the end.

I was hoping for another author (or two!) somewhere that has written a series that is similar to Brandon Sanderson in that sort of grand epic, detailed world, hero goes from unknown peasant to king of the world (figuratively) while they learn to control their powers... More Robert Jordan / Sanderson to tide me over until the next one comes out :).

Lightbender: I honestly couldn't get into the Thomas Covenant series. Too much self hate perhaps. Lord of the Isles? Why haven't I seen you before? C'mere let me stick you on my kindle...
Sonicator: Both good suggestions, both already read
Prozac: You can add Fiest to the list of series I've read - the Magician, and all the Riftwar novels too. Great series.
AlexDGT: Yup, Ender's Game series is pretty good, although I think my favorite of the series was the original Ender's Game.
Trashie: I'll dig those up and check them out
Chumpy: Mistborn series was great. I've read everything Sanderson I could get my hands on. I've read a number of Donaldson's novels as well, although he's a bit dark and, yeah, well, hating his characters a lot

My recommendations:
The Gentlemen Bastards by Scott Lynch
Fionavar Tapestry by Guy Gavriel Kay (or pretty much anything by him)
Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson
Black Company by Glen Cook
Discworld by Terry Pratchett
Good Omens by Pratchett & Neil Gaiman
Dresden Files by Jim Butcher

+1 for the works of Pat Rothfuss

Putting on my hater hat - I thought Lord of the Isles was absolutely terrible, and even in the middle of a similar drought of books to yours, couldn't bring myself to finish book 2.

Eeek! Finally have time to read everything but my glasses broke and everyone is dead! Help!

Gravey wrote:

Eeek! Finally have time to read everything but my glasses broke and everyone is dead! Help!

Self-lasik.

I'd second the Malazan Book of The Fallen. Chug through the first hundred pages of the first book, which can be a bit of a chore, but Erikson's style really changes after that. I believe there was a ten year gap between the first hundred pages and the next, and the improvement is shocking.

And yeah, Donaldson does hate his characters. But the first trilogy is wonderful. It's not cheery and happy go lucky, so be forewarned.

Gravey wrote:

Eeek! Finally have time to read everything but my glasses broke and everyone is dead! Help!

Welcome to the Twilight Zone.

More practically, try to figure out the distance from your eyes at which you can read the books.

Tanglebones wrote:

My recommendations:
The Gentlemen Bastards by Scott Lynch
Fionavar Tapestry by Guy Gavriel Kay (or pretty much anything by him)
Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson
Black Company by Glen Cook
Discworld by Terry Pratchett
Good Omens by Pratchett & Neil Gaiman
Dresden Files by Jim Butcher

+1 for the works of Pat Rothfuss

Putting on my hater hat - I thought Lord of the Isles was absolutely terrible, and even in the middle of a similar drought of books to yours, couldn't bring myself to finish book 2.

This is pretty close to my list too. I would add Joe Ambercrombie's First Law books and Bakker's Prince of Nothing.

NathanialG wrote:
Tanglebones wrote:

My recommendations:
The Gentlemen Bastards by Scott Lynch
Fionavar Tapestry by Guy Gavriel Kay (or pretty much anything by him)
Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson
Black Company by Glen Cook
Discworld by Terry Pratchett
Good Omens by Pratchett & Neil Gaiman
Dresden Files by Jim Butcher

+1 for the works of Pat Rothfuss

Putting on my hater hat - I thought Lord of the Isles was absolutely terrible, and even in the middle of a similar drought of books to yours, couldn't bring myself to finish book 2.

This is pretty close to my list too. I would add Joe Ambercrombie's First Law books and Bakker's Prince of Nothing.

Ooh.. forgot Abercrombie.. yeah, add him too for sure. I read the first Prince of Nothing book, and while it was an interesting setting, his writing wasn't drawing me in. I might try it again at some point.

Your reading seems pretty close to my list as well (excepting I dropped Sword of Truth pretty quickly) so I'l agree with NathanialG and Tanglebones on Joe Abercrombie's First Law books.

Also going to agree with Dresden Files by Jim Butcher and any Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. Lighter fare, but still damned good.

Thanks guys, this should get me over the hump for a while! I've read a number of the Discworld novels as well, but I've never come across the First Law books - I'll check 'em out!

For some fun fantasy stuff, try the Shadow series by Brent Weeks. Pretty cool idea of how different types of magic work and an interesting world he created.

If you've never read Zelazny's Amber series, you should. They aren't that big, but there are a lot of 'em, and all great stories.

Gah, I do not understand how anyone can recommend Joe Abercrombie. Go to a Barnes and Noble and try it out before you buy.

Patiently awaiting me on my kindle:

His Majesty's Dragon - Naomi Novik (A friend actually gave me the paperbacks, and I got this one for free, but I haven't really wanted to dive into it yet).
Candide - Voltaire
The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View of the Search for God - Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan
Food Inc.: A Participant Guide: How Industrial Food is Making Us Sicker, Fatter, and Poorer-And What You Can Do About It - Karl Weber
The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon - David Grann
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance - Robert M. Pirsig
Understanding Exposure, 3rd Edition - Bryan Peterson
Consider Phlebas - Iain M. Banks
Empire of the East - Fred Saberhagen
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
Anathem - Neal Stephenson
Cat's Cradle - Kurt Vonnegut
Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void - Mary Roach
Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers - Mary Roach
Earth - David Brin
The Killer Angels: The Classic Novel of the Civil War - Michael Shaara
Practical Demonkeeping - Christopher Moore
The Handmaid's Tale: A Novel - Margaret Atwood
The Jeeves Collection - P.G. Wodehouse
The Novels of P.G. Wodehouse (Thirty Three Books with active table of contents) - P.G. Wodehouse
Neuromancer (Ace Science Fiction) - William Gibson
A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again: Essays and Arguments - David Foster Wallace
The Religion of the Samurai A Study of Zen Philosophy and Discipline in China and Japan - Kaiten Nukariya
Life on the Mississippi - Mark Twain
Civil Disobedience - Henry David Thoreau
On the Origin of Species By Means of Natural Selection, or, the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life - Charles Darwin
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - Rebecca Skloot
Under Heaven - Guy Gavriel Kay

Add "Green Eyes" by Lucius Shepard, if you have a Kindle. America's premier magical realist.

OMG don't let this thread usurp my thread!

Pawz wrote:

I'd really like to find something like the Kingmaker series - your basic plot of regular guy finds out he's special, needs to save the world from ultimate destruction somehow, etc. But enhanced with good writing and original plot! I'm itching to get my hands on another set of books I can lay on my Kindle

Though it is not available on Kindle.

The Belgariad.

For Christmas, in my youth, I got the full Chronicles of Thomas Covenant for Christmas, all five books. I spent my vacation reading them all.

The best description I have for that experience is spending about a week badly constipated. Nothing much happens for hundreds of pages at a time. Then some really SUPER cool stuff goes down, and then it's back to hundreds more pages of traveling. Plus, of course, the book is about an antihero, someone who's really rather loathsome.

I've really liked some of Donaldson's other stuff. The Mirror of Her Dreams series was really neat. But I'd give Thomas Covenant a wide berth, were I you.

Oh, I was going to mention The Belgariad as being exactly what you're looking for. But be careful never to read or even admit to the existence of the sequel, The Malloreon, which is the exact same story in the exact same order, for reasons that I never had the patience to discover.

oh, another way to describe Thomas Covenant: two normal books' worth of material bloated into five enormous volumes.

Malor: I'm not sure what you mean by five books. There are two trilogies, and then what's looking like a tetralogy that is still in the process of being written.

On the subject of the Belgariad and TCC, read the Belgariad first. It's light, happy, and entertaining. The first book is the weakest of the series, but he gets going around the end of the second, beginning of the third, and from then on it's really all about the interactions between the cast. If you like that, you'll like the Mallorean which is just more of the same. The plot is weak, as noted, but its about as relevant to the story as whether or not Castle and Beckett will properly file their chain of custody forms for evidence. If you don't like the way the characters interact by the third book, just drop the series, because there isn't much else there.

Then read at least the first TCC chronicles. Again, the first book is kind of weak. The second is fantastic, and the third as well. They completely deconstruct the tropes of the Belgariad, twist them, and hand you back something profoundly f'ked up. The second series is basically more of the same, just not quite as bitter but not quite as good either. The third chronicles is kind of blah.