How's work been?

Yeah I did that for my internships in college. One with a global company employing many thousands. It took like 7-10 business days for me to get access to some system for a project there.

The other was a 15 person consulting group. My manager did all the permissions on my laptop, the servers, etc. in a couple hours one day and I could access everything.

Night and day.

RawkGWJ wrote:

IMAGE(https://i.postimg.cc/c429zRKr/2-F0-AA6-F8-EC1-A-468-E-8-DD7-DB790505499-E.jpg)

Hey! Thanks team!

I’ve given you my blood, sweat, and tears for more than half of the years that I’ve existed on this planet. You emailed me a picture of an airplane! And that “s” at the end of “years” is enclosed in parentheses! Is that because you’re not sure whether 29 years is plural? Or were you trying to exaggerate the intended impersonal sentiment of this occasion? ...

That's literally more than my company did for my 25th.

For my 20th work anniversary, my name was included in a PowerPoint at a companywide meeting.

And speaking of companywide meetings, the most recent (and last) managing editor once misspelled my surname in a presentation.

It's honestly no big deal. I write for a legacy print media company, and my name has been in the paper and on the website almost every day for more than a quarter of a century.

I guess the boss wants everyone back in the office soon. So glad they waited for the pandemic to be over. The reasoning makes no real sense at it is all receptionist stuff which is handled by the building. So I have no idea what this achive other than piss off the employees that have to come in.

Absolute chaos, and soon it'll be absolute chaos and with an air of confusion since we are no longer the customers of our own mission requirements. So time to fly by the seat of our pants and hope that we are doing what our customers need!

How to lose workers.

A) Stupid deadlines.
B) Raise and hiring freezes even when the company is damn near printing money.
C) Management not following their own policies.
D) No consistency.

The logistics manager is putting in her resignation. Unfortunately that means management will likely dump all her duties on me, because they'd rather do that than replace her. I've made them well aware that I build things, I wouldn't do well in a logistics position. So... let's get that ole' resume out and start refreshing it.

There's a job with a former employer of mine that I kind of qualify for... it'll be more stress, but I can't see how it'd be less pay. It's functioning as a liaison between them and government customers... It involves creating solutions, ordering supplies, doing quotes, and troubleshooting connections, most of which I can do. They're asking for a BA but I have 7 years experience working for them, I might be able to squeeze through without it since I tick a lot of the other boxes you won't get with a college grad (mostly technical experience working in the plant).

I didn't want to hop jobs with my wife retiring, but I'm not about to do 2-3 people's jobs because the company is too cheap to hire the number of people they actually need, or take care of the people they already have. If they lose the two of us they'll be crippled until they get people up to speed.

Requires a BA? But also experience in the field?

Sounds like HR speak for, "We'll get too many applicants if we don't put 'BA required' in the job posting."

f*ck that.

Go for it.

*Former HR guy.

Yeah, it was laughably tacked on to the job listing. Here's the paraphrased minimum requirements:

- 7 to 10 years experience (Network Operations or Engineering)
- "Must know ethernet networking" (sounds too silly to paraphrase)
- Knowledge of network and/or architecture (not sure how this is different from the last bullet point, unless they mean the HFC plant which you aren't going to get unless you were a network tech)
- Communication skills (I can read powerpoints)
- Professional customer-facing demeanor (this is unfortunately what had me running escalations for years)
- Experience ordering and provisioning (gov provisioning nice to have)

And they don't even care what kind of degree...

Education
Bachelor's Degree

This is a long time ago but I applied for job requiring 5 years experience in WebSphere at a time when the product had only existed for less than 2 years. I had zero years but thought, WTH, and applied. Recruitment agencies putting in the minimum of effort...

I applied for a new job but the language is so generic I have no idea what it is other than kind of the same kind of job I have now? If I get an interview maybe I will find out if I want this job.

As someone who has worked for some kind of recruitment or professional services agency for the last 13+ years, usually the problem stems from the actual employer. The client creates an internal system for pre-qualifying people who come in from external agencies which leaves special circumstances in the dust.

Some of the bizarre things I've had to deal with:
- A Project Manager with 20+ years working in similar environments was disqualified for not having a BA, which again could have been a major in anything, but their made up points system for what a "Senior Project Manager" had to have was not up to debate.
- A client needed a solution implemented but again created a system where relevant certifications were mandatory. As a result, a candidate who literally implemented this solution for years was instantly disqualified because they stopped paying for the ridiculous certification fee every two years. Instead, the client chose someone who had the cert but never actually worked with the solution in real life ever, and charged twice as much.
- The client released a competitive RFP with harsh restrictions on SAP HANA experience along with other tools associated with it that bidders had to abide by. By the time they awarded the contract, they then decided not to perform the upgrade. So for the 5 year duration of the contract, we could only submit people who had 5 years of S4HANA experience as well as experience with cloud migrations... So they they could work in an environment maintaining SAP ECC 6.0 and an on-site database.

Well, today was a fun day. Logistics Manager (LM) formally handed in her resignation to our manager, who immediately forwarded it to the president. President and HR asked LM to attend a meeting. In there she goes over all the ways our processes and policies are falling apart, and our department is basically holding all this sh*t together, and how for her own mental health she just can't do it anymore. She points out something I didn't know, which is that our GM had specifically told her that she was not to bring issues to the president's attention, and that all problems should only be directed to her (GM). The build I have been working on this week was basically used as a prime example, in that I could have built it at any time in the past 6 months, but because SO MANY PEOPLE put it off it became a massive emergency with too little time to do a good job on it at a time when we were knee deep in the biggest project this company has ever attempted... it really wasn't a good time for me to get pulled away for a few days.

President knows how much LM does for the company, and she let them know that I outright refused to do her job. At the end they offered our department a sizable raise. The other installer and I got the same bump, which for me was about 17.4%. She got a higher raise which she wouldn't disclose, but we were happy for her because she is technically our boss (though we all pretty much work as 3 equals in the department), and handles a few other responsibilities that we don't have to really deal with like inventory, shipping, emails, etc. We're supposed to have a meeting in a couple weeks to try to correct all the ways our build process is falling apart from the top down.

The sad part is, I'm still going to put in my resume with my former employer. I'm happy for more money, but I don't have a lot of faith in them making the changes necessary to stop these situations from happening.

I had been out of work since December of 2018. I worked in higher education, overseeing a number of media oriented programs. I was good at what I did, but our school closed. I was one of the last 5 people on campus at the end. I had a hell of a time finding work after that because I didn't have a Masters degree. And going back into the field I came from (Video Games) was impossible because I was in my late 40's and it had been over a decade since I last was credited on a game. Then everyone saw Higher Ed and assumed I couldn't do anything. Took me over two years, but I'm finally working again. I was talking with my therapist about my trouble finding work. She told me something I hadn't even considered. Because of everything going on in my life (divorce, co-parenting three children, pandemic, new relationship, etc...) I hadn't ever had time to mourn the loss of my job. No joke, after spending a few weeks doing that, this job opportunity popped up.

I helped a friend get a job as a tattoo artist by polishing up her resume and giving her language to use. Got a couple tattoos from her, and her boss took a liking to me. Her boss and I became friends and it turned out she really needed someone to oversee the studio since that side of things was hard for her, and took time from actual tattooing and training. After conferring with my friend who worked for her, she asked me to take on the role of Studio Manager. So now I run a tattoo studio! She's a famous artist in the bay area and likes to take on apprentices. She keeps the studio friendly and treats her employees well. My first goal was to figure out how to get the finances in order. No one had been able to tattoo for over a year. They had stopped paying rent on the studio. Since I started in March, we have gone from owing $18,000.00 in back rent to $10,000.00. We should be paid off by October. I love this job! Now she's training me to tattoo as well. She designed my avatar which I'm now using on this site as well.

I am very excited to tattoo and grow this studio.

That's fantastic, Toddland!

That is an amazing story, Toddland!

@Toddland - I just completed 2 rounds on interviews at AAU
It is in IT (tier 2 support) but for the main office and staff, not the vfx or video games department. Galina even gave me a surprise glowing reference! So I am keeping my fingers crossed. It would be so nice to get back into the industry on a more official capacity than dabbling hobbyist.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/K3hXJxo.jpg)

PurEvil wrote:

Well, today was a fun day. Logistics Manager (LM) formally handed in her resignation to our manager, who immediately forwarded it to the president. President and HR asked LM to attend a meeting. In there she goes over all the ways our processes and policies are falling apart, and our department is basically holding all this sh*t together, and how for her own mental health she just can't do it anymore. She points out something I didn't know, which is that our GM had specifically told her that she was not to bring issues to the president's attention, and that all problems should only be directed to her (GM). The build I have been working on this week was basically used as a prime example, in that I could have built it at any time in the past 6 months, but because SO MANY PEOPLE put it off it became a massive emergency with too little time to do a good job on it at a time when we were knee deep in the biggest project this company has ever attempted... it really wasn't a good time for me to get pulled away for a few days.

President knows how much LM does for the company, and she let them know that I outright refused to do her job. At the end they offered our department a sizable raise. The other installer and I got the same bump, which for me was about 17.4%. She got a higher raise which she wouldn't disclose, but we were happy for her because she is technically our boss (though we all pretty much work as 3 equals in the department), and handles a few other responsibilities that we don't have to really deal with like inventory, shipping, emails, etc. We're supposed to have a meeting in a couple weeks to try to correct all the ways our build process is falling apart from the top down.

The sad part is, I'm still going to put in my resume with my former employer. I'm happy for more money, but I don't have a lot of faith in them making the changes necessary to stop these situations from happening.

Awesome on the pay bump!

Also: 17%+ raise at instant speed for mission critical department...after labor threatens to walk for legit health reasons.

f*ck unfettered capitalism.

Struggling with my current dilemma. A former colleague reached out about a job. At the very same time, I'm reaching a stressful tipping point at my current one.

We've lost a few contracts recently because of something that was missed in our submissions. While I'm the last one involved in the process, the issue is for the past two years I have continued to get things way too late in the process to prepare and review things properly. I don't feel like I'm being given the brunt of the blame either. However, it still leaves a pit in my stomach because (a) I don't know if this will ever change - the learned lessons seem pointless if the same underlying cause happens again next time; (b) At this rate, it may only be a matter of time before I do take the brunt of the blame; (c) Also can't deny that possibly a small part of the problem is a feeling like I'm just grinding at the job leading me to not do it as well.

The new job would be kind of a lateral move. They would pass my current salary but couldn't match it combined with the profit sharing I have so it'll be pretty even, although to be fair with our business not doing as well, that might not be the case for much longer. However, the work would be much different from what I've been doing the last decade. It's just a question of will I find it invigorating and challenging, or will I suck at it and/or hate it. And of course, if I don't fit in the job environment, I will probably be able to find another job in my field but because of market factors it would be at a lower pay.

Yeah, so that's my current mental struggle of whether to take the risk or stick with the devil I know. Usually the answer is obvious to me, but this one is less clearcut. The plus is that the person offering it is taking a week's vacation so I have a while to mull it about.

As expected, even making a pros and cons list came out even.

Top_Shelf wrote:

Also: 17%+ raise at instant speed for mission critical department...after labor threatens to walk for legit health reasons.

f*ck unfettered capitalism.

It's actually quite shocking how many people I know who got their raise/permanent contract/whatever else they wanted from their employer not through obviously proving their value and asking nicely, but by threatening to quit. What a broken way of thinking.

I am seeing so many stories that sound similar to my work place and my current issues. Do we all work at the same place or are you all me?

kuddles wrote:

Struggling with my current dilemma. A former colleague reached out about a job. At the very same time, I'm reaching a stressful tipping point at my current one.

We've lost a few contracts recently because of something that was missed in our submissions. While I'm the last one involved in the process, the issue is for the past two years I have continued to get things way too late in the process to prepare and review things properly. I don't feel like I'm being given the brunt of the blame either. However, it still leaves a pit in my stomach because (a) I don't know if this will ever change - the learned lessons seem pointless if the same underlying cause happens again next time; (b) At this rate, it may only be a matter of time before I do take the brunt of the blame; (c) Also can't deny that possibly a small part of the problem is a feeling like I'm just grinding at the job leading me to not do it as well.

The new job would be kind of a lateral move. They would pass my current salary but couldn't match it combined with the profit sharing I have so it'll be pretty even, although to be fair with our business not doing as well, that might not be the case for much longer. However, the work would be much different from what I've been doing the last decade. It's just a question of will I find it invigorating and challenging, or will I suck at it and/or hate it. And of course, if I don't fit in the job environment, I will probably be able to find another job in my field but because of market factors it would be at a lower pay.

Yeah, so that's my current mental struggle of whether to take the risk or stick with the devil I know. Usually the answer is obvious to me, but this one is less clearcut. The plus is that the person offering it is taking a week's vacation so I have a while to mull it about.

As expected, even making a pros and cons list came out even.

Top_Shelf wrote:

Also: 17%+ raise at instant speed for mission critical department...after labor threatens to walk for legit health reasons.

f*ck unfettered capitalism.

It's actually quite shocking how many people I know who got their raise/permanent contract/whatever else they wanted from their employer not through obviously proving their value and asking nicely, but by threatening to quit. What a broken way of thinking.

This is interesting as it covers me thoughts. I applied for a job I am not sure I want given the lack of key information in the ad. If I get an interview I will have to ask for these details. Even though I know I am far off from getting into this job it is eating at me stress of current job vs stress of new job.

If I told my boss I had applied for another job I would assume one of two reactions. Either write me off then and there as leaving or they would take what will it take to make you stay actions. The sad part is I don't know which would happen. We have lost a number of people during the pandemic and we only just started trying to fill those holes.

Good luck on your job quest.

17%, one person senior and two “junior”… That smacks of “Instead of hiring someone new, take 50% of the salary of a new person (rounded up) and break it between the 3 of them…

kuddles wrote:

Yeah, so that's my current mental struggle of whether to take the risk or stick with the devil I know. Usually the answer is obvious to me, but this one is less clearcut. The plus is that the person offering it is taking a week's vacation so I have a while to mull it about.

For me, I get more value out of the people I work with rather than the details of the work that I do. One of the things that may help you is it sounds like the new risky position is working with someone who values your work. Working with those people who can also better listen to you, can better help when you want to change what you do if the new work isn't as challenging or interesting. There is also the perspective that one job sounds like it is treading water or slightly declining and the other is growing. You may be able to negotiate bonuses at the new job if you can make an impact.

edit: that 17% while it is nice to have more money, reeks to me of being f*cked over for a long time. It also reeks of throwing money at the problem and expecting it to go away. (pushing goal posts...)

Yeah, and doing something new feels risky because I'm concerned things won't work out because of it. But it also could be perceived as risky when I'm doing the same thing for over a decade and never getting any new skills.

Sometimes I think my life would have been better in North Korea, where someone just told me what to do all the time and I didn't have to overthink it.

kuddles wrote:

Sometimes I think my life would have been better in North Korea, where someone just told me what to do all the time and I didn't have to overthink it. :)

Being starved all the time is not that appealing though

kuddles - it sounds like your current job is crap, but you are afraid to move to a new job because it MIGHT be crap. It might also not be crap. You already KNOW what you have is crap, but at least with the new job there is a chance it might not be. Why not go for it?

Also, having straight salary is always better than having profit sharing or a bonus or whatever, stuff that can be reduced or taken away a lot easier than a salary cut. Also the chance you might like the job and the people you work with must be worth some amount of money.

Just my thoughts on what you posted. Sounds more like a fear of change than anything. Which is understandable, change is hard, especially if you've been in one place for a while.

I should stress that my current job is deffo not crap, which is what is making the decision a challenge. It's a small company, so it has an easy-going attitude, no office politics, no micro-managing. They also like me there, so current issues notwithstanding, I'm pretty secure. While the last year has seen me more annoyed and lacking motivation, overall it's the best job I've ever had.

It's more that being a very small company currently running into problems, I don't know if things are going to improve, at least in the short term, and I don't have any prospects to change my role. I've been promised to succeed someone who is going to retire in the next year or so, but she's been "going to retire in the next year or so" for about 5 years running now and doesn't talk about retiring at all, and also happens to be a primary source of some of my stress.

Got it. Sounds like typical small company stuff. Is the new job a bigger company with potentially more room to grow?

Yes, much bigger company. Of course, based on my experience working with larger companies, that comes with its own problems, but it also sounds like the team I will be working with are kinda on their own.

I'm leaning towards taking it because it would be good to get experience in a different avenue and because I normally wouldn't entertain people reaching out with job opportunities on LinkedIn so something unconscious must be going on.

kuddles wrote:

Yes, much bigger company. Of course, based on my experience working with larger companies, that comes with its own problems, but it also sounds like the team I will be working with are kinda on their own.

I'm leaning towards taking it because it would be good to get experience in a different avenue and because I normally wouldn't entertain people reaching out with job opportunities on LinkedIn so something unconscious must be going on.

if there is nothing in your direct power to do to effect change at your current company, yeah I agree that the new opportunity is worth taking.

I just completed a mandatory HR training involving bribes and side agreements in which the evil customer was an obvious homage to Hans Landa from Inglorious Bastards fame.

I emailed HR to remind them that damaging stereotypes are a violation of our company code of conduct.

Like, how did you come to conclusion it was Hans?

Pipe?
Accent?
Gray trenchcoat by Hugo Boss?
"That's a bingo!"?
Deaths head insignia on cap?
Carved swastika?