How's work been?

Paleocon wrote:

I just had a look at my payroll summary and it looks like I haven't been accruing any PTO since January because I haven't been taking any time. I am not sure doing so would be terribly helpful as I wouldn't really be able to go anywhere.

Taking the time and doing something (anything!) different than the routine is recommended. Make a gundam model. Read a book. Spend an entire day roaming the wilderness. I get it that it's not the activities you're missing the most but take the time. Use it for something that is not work.

While I was griping about my job situation just a few minutes ago on the plus I am at least able to just take a day with no guff given, and man is it sometimes just plain necessary.

Yeah just taking a couple Fridays off and gaming all day (hey we're on gwj) can be a big mental health break.

imbiginjapan wrote:

PS This is a hospital, so it's a bit of an odd machine anyway. The laws of business physics have more or less been suspended as maintaining patient care positions has been the first priority and the administrative end has really suffered in terms of person-power and budgets as we struggle to keep up in spite of being pressed by state and national forces to provide ever greater amounts of data. A fair number of people have just said 'to heck with it' and left.

Yep. In my experience hospitals do not value their IT. I was promised a raise when I started because I was borderline on the job required experience from one dev level to the next. 1st year eval no raise. 2nd year eval, no raise. New manager on team, no raise. Had baby, talked to manager again, watched him find 50k out of nowhere from budget for an upgrade project after telling me the was no money for an 8k raise...

Called tech agency and told them what I needed, left for a real development company for 15k raise within a month.

And had a 2nd kid since then and got 12 weeks paid paternity leave. So much better than burning all my PTO at the old place and going a week of unpaid leave for the first kid. You'd think hospitals would be smarter about birth and parenting but they sucked.

Stele wrote:
imbiginjapan wrote:

PS This is a hospital, so it's a bit of an odd machine anyway. The laws of business physics have more or less been suspended as maintaining patient care positions has been the first priority and the administrative end has really suffered in terms of person-power and budgets as we struggle to keep up in spite of being pressed by state and national forces to provide ever greater amounts of data. A fair number of people have just said 'to heck with it' and left.

Yep. In my experience hospitals do not value their IT. I was promised a raise when I started because I was borderline on the job required experience from one dev level to the next. 1st year eval no raise. 2nd year eval, no raise. New manager on team, no raise. Had baby, talked to manager again, watched him find 50k out of nowhere from budget for an upgrade project after telling me the was no money for an 8k raise...

Called tech agency and told them what I needed, left for a real development company for 15k raise within a month.

And had a 2nd kid since then and got 12 weeks paid paternity leave. So much better than burning all my PTO at the old place and going a week of unpaid leave for the first kid. You'd think hospitals would be smarter about birth and parenting but they sucked.

Man that sucks. My situation isn't quite that bad, I've never gone a year without a raise (even this one is retro) and they provide company-wide flat bonuses to all employees every year, so that the lowest-paid environmental services aide comes away with the same annual bonus $$$ as the Chief of Medicine, which is honestly pretty admirable. We even have a true pension plan in addition to a 403(b). Even this year when they lost money for the first time in three decades they took the unprecedented step of pulling a couple thousand per person from emergency funds and trust as a sign of appreciation so I can't complain about actual compensation. In spite off all the bullcrap we're going through they still try... it's just too few hands for too much work right now and we can't seem to catch a break so people are just physically and mentally spent regardless of the good intentions. The CIO himself has pulled multiple all-nighters trying to support outages and other trash fires which is why he has no energy to figure out the staffing situation and HR is eternally occupied trying to fill nursing positions and have their own staffing problems right now.

Paleocon wrote:

I have been burning out because of a combination of scheduling (accounts in UK and Japan require me to be in meetings at 7am and 9pm), social isolation, and the inability to take meaningful time off because of covid restrictions. My normal avenues for decompression (jiu jitsu, hanging with friends, eating out, travel...) are not available and I find my mental resiliency diminished.

I just had a look at my payroll summary and it looks like I haven't been accruing any PTO since January because I haven't been taking any time. I am not sure doing so would be terribly helpful as I wouldn't really be able to go anywhere.

I just finished a week off from home and it was great! I got a bunch of lingering house chores done, did some serious gaming, enjoyed some reading and just generally chilled. Highly recommend using your time off.

We have 'unlimited' PTO (with all of its pitfalls) so, I'm trying to take at least 1 full week off every quarter this year.

About three years ago, I joined my company's Women in Technology chapter. A mentor of mine apparently identified me as an ally and invited me and I have been mostly participating through book clubs ever since. The first book we went through was Taran Wheeler's Women in Tech, which I found equal parts inspiring and hilarious. I told my fellow book club members that my key takeaway from it was that I don't play nearly enough D&D to properly advance my career.

Anyway, we are working on Smith and Johnson's book Good Guys now and we got on the subjects of traditional gender roles and intersectionality. An Asian female coworker talked about how she felt like WFH had increased her distractions because there was always something to do around the house. I asked if her WFH husband participated and she made some statement about cultural/gender differences and that men aren't as affected by mess or clutter.

I countered that housework was still work despite the fact that it is uncompensated. And the fact that we, as a society, have an expectation that the majority of unpaid work should be performed by women was one powerful way we reinforce wage disparities. I further went on to say that when my wife used to thank me for "helping" her with the housework, instead of telling her she was welcome, I corrected her by reminding her that I live here too. Fathers don't "help raise kids". They raise kids. Husbands don't "help with the housework". They do housework.

I didn't want to make it accusatory and made it clear I was talking generally and not specific to any one person's situation, but I still feel like I made folks uncomfortable.

Right there with you paleo. Have had to correct my parents when they said I was "babysitting" my own daughter.

Got promoted to an interim Team Lead position in the group that does work closest to mine. I am mostly just picking up managerial stuff while keeping my main project.

It's not really a promotion in the compensation aspect, it's more of a promotion in a job security and moving from the sub contractor to the main company should I take the position officially. Which gives better benefits and maybe better pay... but I'm not sure on that one. The company I sub contract for is more interested in expertise than management tiers... so the subject matter experts make more money than managers.

I agreed to do it because I am worried about stability and this makes me more valuable. I would rather stay on the technical path, but considering the absolute hate for NASA space programs these days, I think I should stick with jobs that look good on resumes as opposed to ones that are fulfilling.

It does give me the opportunity to learn about more things which is nice, but the group I'm taking over is much more hand to mouth and does little development. My current boss thinks it could be a good way to get more collaboration between groups and build a stronger overall group.

On my first day without a job, the placement agency I worked for previously calls and says they have a need for someone with my expertise... for the same client I just quit.

I asked if this was the same project I was working on. The person said no. We'll see if this goes anywhere. I'm pretty sure the client won't want me, but the person didn't sound very concerned (different project, different manager).

bobbywatson wrote:

On my first day without a job, the placement agency I worked for previously calls and says they have a need for someone with my expertise... for the same client I just quit.

I asked if this was the same project I was working on. The person said no. We'll see if this goes anywhere. I'm pretty sure the client won't want me, but the person didn't sound very concerned (different project, different manager).

If it's the same client but a different program completely, wave at them as you walk by. That's what I would do. I'm spiteful and petty, especially if things did not end on good terms and everyone is/was aware of it.

I also would be fired, so... uh, don't do what I would do. The fact that I'm fully employed sometimes boggles my mind sometimes, and the fact that I was only fired by part-time jobs in college that never went on any resume is somewhat a miracle.

Vrikk wrote:
bobbywatson wrote:

On my first day without a job, the placement agency I worked for previously calls and says they have a need for someone with my expertise... for the same client I just quit.

I asked if this was the same project I was working on. The person said no. We'll see if this goes anywhere. I'm pretty sure the client won't want me, but the person didn't sound very concerned (different project, different manager).

If it's the same client but a different program completely, wave at them as you walk by. That's what I would do. I'm spiteful.

It's all remote work at the moment, so that's not happening To be fair: I would not mind working with some of my former colleagues. It's only been a day and I miss them already. I do not miss the old project, and I don't think I ever will.

New job offer has been accepted, and I've given my notice to my current employer. The next two weeks will be handing everything off and documenting everything I can. The sense of stress relief at leaving this job and going to a new one is palpable. It's like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders.

We'll see how long I'm at the new gig before I'm back here complaining about work again.

2 year anniversary at my job coming up next week and I'm still thrilled I left the old place.

ThatGuy42 wrote:

New job offer has been accepted, and I've given my notice to my current employer. The next two weeks will be handing everything off and documenting everything I can. The sense of stress relief at leaving this job and going to a new one is palpable. It's like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders.

We'll see how long I'm at the new gig before I'm back here complaining about work again. :D

Congratulations!

Not exactly work related, but a couple years back I was in a program for veterans and military spouses that paid for me to take a certification. On recommendations here, I took the Security+ course. I passed it back in June 2019, and recently got offered a course/test for Cisco Certified CyberOps Associate by the same group. It's free, and I only needed to take a qualification exam (some Linux, some Windows, some Networking, some Security+ stuff) which I passed fine, though I had some qualms with some of the questions. One in particular was something like "You have a network, 192.168.100.0/24, how many hosts can you have? (Choose 2). A) 24 B) 100 C) 196 D) 254". Like... how do you choose 2 when that network can have 254 hosts? Apparently it was C and D, which makes no sense, so I got it half wrong.

Still, I passed it, I'm taking the course, though I've gotten exactly 0 use out of my Security+, and expect this to be roughly as useful. I'm kind of comfy in my mostly cushy job, so I'm not sure if I should really start looking at other jobs that, while they would probably pay better, would come with added stress, heavier commutes, and worse life/work balance. I guess I'll cross that mental bridge if I pass the course.

Two weeks of being a system engineer have now passed. Two weeks of still doing my old job with no eta of when I can begin moving to the job I am being paid for. Oh well, the extra money is nice and will help pay credit cards off so we can move to a newer house.

bobbywatson wrote:

On my first day without a job, the placement agency I worked for previously calls and says they have a need for someone with my expertise... for the same client I just quit.

I asked if this was the same project I was working on. The person said no. We'll see if this goes anywhere. I'm pretty sure the client won't want me, but the person didn't sound very concerned (different project, different manager).

Apparently even the client doesn't care that I just quit on them, 'cause they called me directly late this afternoon for a six months contract on another project. And since there's no placement agency this time, I can even get a better rate. We'll see if this pans out, but it looks promising.

So much for me losing sleep over fear of being blacklisted.

Edit: Interview on Thursday.