Xian door-knockers -- why do they bother?

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In my first apartment without a internal stairwell now and got my first solicitor. Some guy shows up around 8:00PM when it's dark out and I've got the door open (with the screen door shut and locked) and starts going on about selling candy bars to get child raising classes or something. I ended up buying one I didn't want for $6 since I felt bad just blowing him off.

Then the other day some Police offers knocked on my door asking if I was some guy I'd never heard of. They then asked to see my driver's license (is this even legal?).

I think I'm leaving the door shut from now on :).

PandaEskimo wrote:

They then asked to see my driver's license (is this even legal?).

In most states a police officer can only ask to see your license if you are operating a motor vehicle, because that is the only time you are legally required to have one.

PandaEskimo wrote:

(is this even legal?)

No.

Well, they can ask, but you don't have to show it to them.

And they could arrest you as the other person if you fit the general location and are in the address they have for them. Win? Maybe it's easier to just show the license...

Yeah, once you open the door you're kinda screwed either way.

clover wrote:
PandaEskimo wrote:

(is this even legal?)

No.

Well, they can ask, but you don't have to show it to them.

In some states you do have to provide your name should a law enforcement officer ask. Basically, if you want to maximize your use of constitutional rights and privacy, it goes something like this:

Be Polite

Inform the officer that you wish to remain silent

Ask the officer if you are under arrest, if you are, request a lawyer and otherwise remain silent

If you are not under arrest, ask if you are free to go

You do not have to consent to any search if you are not under arrest, however usually it is permissible for an officer to pat you down for weapons.

You don't have to ever let officers into your home unless they have a search warrant. A search warrant will specify precisely what areas may be searched. If they have a warrant for your arrest, they can come in if there's reason to believe you're present.

The thing most people bone up when dealing with police is that you can't really challenge your treatment right there on the street. Be co-operative, don't fight, don't verbally abuse officers or make threats. Just remember badge numbers, witnesses, etc. Remain otherwise silent, ask for a lawyer, and write everything down at your first opportunity.