Tabletop RPG Catch All

Fallout Tabletop Role Playing Game

Welcome to the Wasteland. Welcome to the world of Fallout.

Create your own survivors, super mutants, ghouls, and even Mister Handy robots, and immerse yourselves in the iconic post-nuclear apocalyptic world, while gamemasters guide their group through unique Fallout stories. This 2d20 edition of Fallout is as close to the bottlecap-bartering, wasteland wandering, Brotherhood battling excitement of Fallout you can get.

  • Immerse yourself in the genre-defining setting with the official Fallout™ tabletop roleplaying game.
  • Create your group of original characters, including vault dwellers, ghouls, super mutants, and even robots. Tell your own stories of survival in post-nuclear America using a host of non-playable characters and horrific mutated creatures.
  • Use iconic weapons, armor, chems, and items translated straight from the video game. Scavenge the ruins of the old world and make your mark on the wasteland.
  • Utilize the 2d20 System—a roleplaying rules set that supports both story-led adventures and detailed gameplay. Use Action Points to power your incredible wasteland wanderers, and augment their actions with your fantastic Perks.
  • Use an extensive catalogue of creatures and characters from the world of Fallout.
SpyNavy wrote:

BuzzW - I may be game, when do you play? Im getting ready to run some DnD5E on Fantasy Grounds, but Id love to actually play again as well.

You know, when you asked that it made me realize that we didn't have a set time, we just schedule it week by week. So I got my group together and asked them, and we agreed Friday or Saturday evenings would be easiest for everyone. Though we could do a session zero/character creation thing basically anytime. If you (or anyone else) is interested maybe pm me?

Trachalio wrote:

I'm going to be playing D&D for the first time in about 12 years tomorrow night. 5th edition looks pretty sweet and much less of a gridded tactics game than 4E (which I did love btw), but I have a question:

How do you stop obsessing over how your character looks in Heroforge? Because I think I've spent more time fixing my bards look than I have reading the PHB :D

Switch to LEGO minifigs?

Trachalio wrote:

I'm going to be playing D&D for the first time in about 12 years tomorrow night. 5th edition looks pretty sweet and much less of a gridded tactics game than 4E (which I did love btw)

If you liked 4th Edition's Epic Fantasy feel but want to step away from gridded combat, I'd like to suggest you look into 13th Age. It's made by people who worked on 4e but wanted a more story driven "indie" feel.

I've never played 4E, but 5E seems over-simplified to me. The lines between the classes get blurred (especially in terms of spells) . The combat mechanics really boil down to doing what you can to get "advantage" (which just means rolling twice and using the higher number). Yes, each class gets their special abilities but those often feel like another way to get "advantage".

I dunno, maybe I'm beginning to burn out on the D&D theme and starting to see the limitation of sword & sorcery.

YMMV and all that, but coming from Pathfinder, the advantage mechanic was one of the most welcome changes when I switched to 5e. Yes it's simplified, but I'll take that over adding up all the little situational +1s and +2s from various sources.

There are other sword and sorcery games out there. Ironsworn looks particularly cool.

I've played a ridiculous amount of 5e, particularly within the last year, and it's not really about getting advantage at all; if it's there, it's great, but it's not that big of a deal. 5e really moved away from being overly mechanical in terms of how it plays and there's more space for narrative stuff. I know it's crunchier than lots of other systems, but 5e's much lighter on rules than earlier versions, and that just means it plays better. Simplifying things down to advantage/disadvantage/normal is really great and easy, and the lack of complex math is a huge plus.

Honestly, even though there are a lot fewer character options than in 3.5 or even 4e, the game feels a lot more flexible in lots of ways. 4e gave you the illusion of complexity by having lots of class options, but your abilities across classes all were pretty much the same; do X damage and move an ally up to Y squares on the grid was a common thing across many classes, and the game itself really broke itself down into four real classes of Controller, Striker, Leader, and Defender, and, even though it seemed like there were lots of things to play, they realistically all pretty much felt the same. 3.5 had a massive bloat of options, but I felt like it really restricted you in that due to the nature of optimization in that game, you basically had to plan your build from level 1 onward or you'd be exponentially so much less effective than your allies you might as well not have shown up. By the end of the edition, most of 3.5 was pretty much a character optimization metagame that eventually involved D&D.

Advantage is really not that big of a deal in 5e. I mean, this edition has clearly moved much further from the old-school wargaming roots of D&D than any other edition, but I've never been bored with combat options, and I've played any number of characters who all have felt quite different from each other. No complaints about it at all.

Mulling it over, I disagree that class features tend to be just another way of getting advantage. Very few class features actually have to do with granting advantage; those that interact with the advantage system at all tend to be more about giving you extra bonuses when you already have advantage from circumstance or a spell effect or something, e.g. the Rogue's Sneak Attack feature.

More often, class features interact with the action economy. Any time you're choosing a class or subclass, the question you're asking yourself is, "how am I going to be using my bonus action and reaction?" because those are resources that will go to waste if you don't have a good answer to that question.

Often, there's also a class-specific resource to manage, like Barbarian Rages, Bardic Inspiration Dice, Channel Divinity uses, etc. And often, the use for those resources is to answer the "how am I going to be using my bonus action / reaction?" question.

MilkmanDanimal wrote:

I know it's crunchier than lots of other systems, but 5e's much lighter on rules than earlier versions, and that just means it plays better. Simplifying things down to advantage/disadvantage/normal is really great and easy, and the lack of complex math is a huge plus.

Honestly, I'm at the point now where I decide if I want tactical complexity or story based gameplay. If it's the former, 5e is too light for me, and if it's the latter there's far better choices than 5e there too. Games like Whitehack or even Fate will scratch that itch for me more than 5e ever would.

But sometimes, I really DO like getting into nitty-gritty tactical combat which is why I have really re-fallen in love with 4e. What it does, it does extremely well. I couldn't disagree more that the classes fell "samey", especially looking at what those classes do in other versions of D&D.

The sad thing is, the way that classes feel "different" in other versions of D&D is by making some classes just outright better than others. 4e made fighters INTERESTING to play, and then 5e comes along and goes "wellll, actually let's go back to making fighters just do regular attacks and leave it at that."

If I want the best of both worlds, I'll reach for 13th Age, which has some rich tactical goodness (but far shy of 4e's grid based combat) but also incorporates great story based mechanics like "one unique thing" and "no skills, only backgrounds".

Advantage is really not that big of a deal in 5e.

Advantage is a little odd. It's easy, for sure, but the effects of it vary SO MUCH depending on what your chance of success is. If you need to roll a 20, it's basically a +1, but if you need to roll an 11, you're getting the equivalent of +5 (!!). So it's kind of hard to quantify. I LIKE it mechanically, it's elegant, but man it's like so inconsistent in effect.

I think advantage/disadvantage is a great mechanic. And it's super easy to conceptualize - having advantage is just having a do-over. The thing you're trying to do isn't getting any easier - an impossible task doesn't become possible, like it might with a +N modifier. You're just getting a mulligan if you miss.

In other words, a +N modifier means the task has gotten easier, and advantage means it's gotten easier for you attempt the task. Or that's how I visualize things.

My main annoyance with 5e is the way long rests *completely* reset everyone back to full strength. If you're in a place where combat isn't that frequent, then as a DM you either need to make things super deadly, or else arbitrarily withhold long rests. (And that latter option has gotten harder since my players learned Leomund's Tiny Hut!)

Secondary complaint, I echo about the similarity between classes. Especially with subclasses - it feels like the vast majority of subclasses are basically equivalent to taking a few levels in another class, so nothing really feels unique to anyone. (In fact, in my current campaign we all agreed to not even bother reading how multiclassing works - subclasses already feel like the same thing, so the only reason to multiclass would be min-maxing.)

I like the optional rule in the DMG where short rests take 8 hours and long rests take a week for exactly that reason. Makes being out in the wilderness feel dangerous, and reaching civilization again feel impactful.

I think the 13th Age rules on that are pretty good- between battles you get a 'quick rest' where you can use some of your "recoveries" to gain some hitpoints back, and roll to see if any expended powers recharge. Every four battles (give or take) you get a "full heal-up" which restores everything. So you have to manage your spells/powers and healing but have some idea when you'll be able to recover them.

On a quite different topic, the alpha of The One Ring second edition rules were just released to backers.

It's a great job of keeping everything good in the game, and streamlining and improving everything else. The next question is whether we update the characters in our ongoing game (in which we're approaching the very end of the epic Darkening of Mirkwood campaign).

Pros: Every change is an improvement.
Cons: Everybody has to rework their character, not all the cultures are represented in the alpha release (we have a Mirkwood elf and soldier of Gondor who we'll be on our own with).

I'm definitely going to pull in a few of the things that we can use without major revisions. The new journey rules in particular look great.
If you've played the first edition journey rules, they've made it less of a "everyone make lots of travel rolls and then we'll see what happens" mechanic. Instead, the group guide rolls and that determines how far you get before the next interruption, and general fatigue is determined by a single roll each when they get to the destination.

While ordering a copy of something with our own Pyxistyx's work, Drive-thru recommended this SCP: The Tabletop RPG book and it looks really interesting. I love the whole SCP vibe, and Control's atmosphere. Very tempting purchase even though I will probably never play it.

fenomas wrote:

My main annoyance with 5e is the way long rests *completely* reset everyone back to full strength. If you're in a place where combat isn't that frequent, then as a DM you either need to make things super deadly, or else arbitrarily withhold long rests. (And that latter option has gotten harder since my players learned Leomund's Tiny Hut!)

I like the way Worlds Without Number makes healing easy, but it still has a cost. The way it does this is with something it calls “system strain”. You have an amount of system strain equal to your Constitution score. You regain system strain after a good night’s rest. You gain system strain when you are subject to magical healing plus other effects and conditions (e.g., not having enough food or water). When you reach your limit, you no longer benefit from the effect (i.e., magical healing won’t work until you regain system strain). If the system strain is imposed on you (by starving, resting outside in the cold without a fire, etc), then you might actually die.

It’s a little like healing surges from 4e, but it resets much more slowly (you only regain 1/day). It also isn’t the basis of your healing effects. It’s just the cost someone pays. You can try doing the wack-a-mole style of healing, but it will burn through system strain. Normally in WWN, you are Mortally Wounded when you reach 0 hit points. If someone stabilizes you, you’ll wake up ten minutes later at 1 hit point and have the Frail quality. Frail means you die if you reach 0 hit points again, and you don’t recover hit points or system strain after a night’s rest. You can get rid of it with a week of rest, a doctor’s treatment, or magical healing. Magical healing can also stabilize someone without giving them the Frail quality. However, magical healing has a cost (system strain).

If I were running 5e or Pathfinder 2e again, I’d import something like system strain to provide for a healing attrition mechanic. I think 5e is better than PF2, which makes it nearly impossible to do hit point attrition while exploring (even in a dungeon), but healing is still pretty easy in either system. However, it’s pretty unlikely that I’d run those either of those systems again considering there are other games that do what I want better.

Hmm, a lot to think about there with alternatives to vanilla long rests. Thanks!

Just thinking out loud, I wonder how it would be to play 5e with short and long rests as written, except very simply have long rests not restore any hit points - just hit dice, which can be spent as usual. And maybe have hit dice spent during a long rest always restore the max value, so it's a bit lenient but there's still a resource being used.

Need to mull this over a bit.

I really like the idea of having to be somewhere safe and comfortable to take a regular 8 hour long rest, somewhere like an inn or a Magnificent Mansion. Otherwise while you're on the road you would fall under the Gritty Realism rules.

It can help make traveling through the wilderness more impactful, grinding down the party's resources to hit that 6-8 encounters per long rest target without having to cram in a bunch of encounters in a single day.

fenomas wrote:

Hmm, a lot to think about there with alternatives to vanilla long rests. Thanks!

You’re welcome!

Just thinking out loud, I wonder how it would be to play 5e with short and long rests as written, except very simply have long rests not restore any hit points - just hit dice, which can be spent as usual. And maybe have hit dice spent during a long rest always restore the max value, so it's a bit lenient but there's still a resource being used.

We tried that in my sandbox campaign. From what I recall, it wasn’t as impactful as I had hoped. Unless you get into fights all the time, there’s usually enough time to rest fully. Magical healing also obviates the need for spending hit dice when resting at the end of the day. It might be okay in a dungeon for imposing a cost on being careless, but we didn’t get a chance to try it in a dungeon before we converted to PF2 (then OSE then WWN …).

Has anyone here used Foundry VTT and if so, thoughts? Seems to be getting high marks on the tube of You.

SpyNavy wrote:

Has anyone here used Foundry VTT and if so, thoughts? Seems to be getting high marks on the tube of You.

I used it to run Pathfinder 2e and Old-School Essentials. I liked it more than roll20. The PF2 support was much better, and it has much more flexible and powerful walls for doing line-of-site on maps. With mods, you can even fake bridges and multiple levels on a map.

My only complaint is I self-hosted, and getting everything going was a time suck. I hosted on Linode using NixOS (see web-host in my NixOS configs as well as my Foundry derivation). It worked pretty well once I got it going, but Foundry’s WebRTC implementation (as of the 0.7.x series I was using) was very unreliable if a TURN server is involved (which is usually). I think most people use a Jitsi module to replace it, but I did not want to use a public server or go through the hassle of setting up mine own.

We’re playing in person again. I don’t like VTTs, and I’m glad I no longer have to maintain the server. However, if we had to go back online, I’d probably use Foundry again. The key would be how good its Worlds Without Number support is. The quality of your system module depends directly on how engaged the community is. Pathfinder had a really robust community.

Actually, from what I understand, the 5e situation kind of sucks. There is a system, but it has little data implemented. You have to enter it yourself or use a browser extension or module to scrape D&D Beyond for data. The last I looked at it, the scraper was only partially free. I think there is also an extension to integrate with D&D Beyond and roll through it, but I don’t think that is free either.

Mixolyde wrote:

There are other sword and sorcery games out there. Ironsworn looks particularly cool.

I downloaded and started reading Ironsworn. It's on my list of games I'm going to be running here soon. I think I'm going to use Foundry and Fantasy Grounds depending on the game. I like Ironsworn as the ability to adapt to D&D or any other setting and reduce the crunchy is pretty dramatic.

the rime campaign i'm part of is using Foundry but the DM has found it to be an absolute nightmare to use (we couldn't even get it to load for us last session). Especially when it comes to setting up the maps correctly. Most of the time he ended up just grabbing whatever random tokens were available and the same generic map and we just half TOTM'd it.

Plus half the time it disconnects every few minutes and slows everything down until it reconnects again.

So personally - don't have good things to say about it. I stick with roll20 myself.

SpyNavy wrote:
Mixolyde wrote:

There are other sword and sorcery games out there. Ironsworn looks particularly cool.

I downloaded and started reading Ironsworn. It's on my list of games I'm going to be running here soon. I think I'm going to use Foundry and Fantasy Grounds depending on the game. I like Ironsworn as the ability to adapt to D&D or any other setting and reduce the crunchy is pretty dramatic.

I started a playthrough here! Ended up drifting away from it after a while because my attention wandered, but it's hecking fun to play solo. I've backed Starforged, the sci-fi 'sequel' and can't wait for it to be finished!

(also I need to go back to this play through at some point!)

It's also got a fantastic Roll20 implementation which has every table and roll necessary all set up for you with macros.

pyxistyx wrote:

the rime campaign i'm part of is using Foundry but the DM has found it to be an absolute nightmare to use (we couldn't even get it to load for us last session). Especially when it comes to setting up the maps correctly. Most of the time he ended up just grabbing whatever random tokens were available and the same generic map and we just half TOTM'd it.

Plus half the time it disconnects every few minutes and slows everything down until it reconnects again.

So personally - don't have good things to say about it. I stick with roll20 myself.

Wayfarer on the forums has used it a lot, including the Rime campaign that I was part of and dropped out. He runs it for two different games and seems to like it a lot. Personally, I didn't but that was more because I didn't like using its built in stuff (character sheets/dice rolling) as I vastly prefer Beyond as well as the fact I am old and stuck in my ways. I will try to have him chip in with thoughts. I understand there is some fiddling, but it generally worked.

pyxistyx wrote:

the rime campaign i'm part of is using Foundry but the DM has found it to be an absolute nightmare to use (we couldn't even get it to load for us last session). Especially when it comes to setting up the maps correctly. Most of the time he ended up just grabbing whatever random tokens were available and the same generic map and we just half TOTM'd it.

Plus half the time it disconnects every few minutes and slows everything down until it reconnects again.

So personally - don't have good things to say about it. I stick with roll20 myself.

Having run a campaign on Roll20 for a year before going to Foundry for that one and my Rime campaign, my experience is very different, however I'd say the following things.

1) Lot of tutorials on setting up maps. I'd say Foundry is much easier than Roll20 just using the built-in (no mods) tools. But you do need to know how to use the tool. It is easy to learn though, and magical once you get it. I can take any map I find on Reddit dndmaps, and have it converted and ready to play in about 30 minutes (including aligning grid, creating walls, and dynamic lighting). I do this on the side for fun for pretty much any interesting map i come across

2) when starting out, try to run as few mods as possible. Most issues derive from people loading up too many mods. Start lean, learn the systems, and then add on from there. I'd say the bare minimum is Beyond20, so that people can actually roll from DnD beyond if they want, and then the Dnd Beyond importer, so you can import people's entire character sheet in an instant (with free version)...if you support his patreon you can also import monsters and even whole adventures from Beyond.

3) it sounds like the person pyxistyx referenced above might not have had a great internet connection or some issue there. Since you are hosting yourself, you do kinda need a decent internet connection. On the other hand, there are Foundry hosting companies that turn it into a similar proposition as Roll20. you can pay monthly and have it run on AWS or whatever. https://forge-vtt.com/ is one of the more popular ones.

I started DMing on Roll20, so it will always have a special place in my heart for that, however their development team is absolute garbage. I dont know what they do with all the money they make, but it sure as hell isnt spent on development. That being said, you can make do decently with what they have, and the ability to just purchase modules and go is certainly nice.

My 2 cents! Take it FWIW and happy DMing!

Wayfarer wrote:
pyxistyx wrote:

the rime campaign i'm part of is using Foundry but the DM has found it to be an absolute nightmare to use (we couldn't even get it to load for us last session). Especially when it comes to setting up the maps correctly. Most of the time he ended up just grabbing whatever random tokens were available and the same generic map and we just half TOTM'd it.

Plus half the time it disconnects every few minutes and slows everything down until it reconnects again.

So personally - don't have good things to say about it. I stick with roll20 myself.

Having run a campaign on Roll20 for a year before going to Foundry for that one and my Rime campaign, my experience is very different, however I'd say the following things.

1) Lot of tutorials on setting up maps. I'd say Foundry is much easier than Roll20 just using the built-in (no mods) tools. But you do need to know how to use the tool. It is easy to learn though, and magical once you get it. I can take any map I find on Reddit dndmaps, and have it converted and ready to play in about 30 minutes (including aligning grid, creating walls, and dynamic lighting). I do this on the side for fun for pretty much any interesting map i come across

2) when starting out, try to run as few mods as possible. Most issues derive from people loading up too many mods. Start lean, learn the systems, and then add on from there. I'd say the bare minimum is Beyond20, so that people can actually roll from DnD beyond if they want, and then the Dnd Beyond importer, so you can import people's entire character sheet in an instant (with free version)...if you support his patreon you can also import monsters and even whole adventures from Beyond.

3) it sounds like the person pyxistyx referenced above might not have had a great internet connection or some issue there. Since you are hosting yourself, you do kinda need a decent internet connection. On the other hand, there are Foundry hosting companies that turn it into a similar proposition as Roll20. you can pay monthly and have it run on AWS or whatever. https://forge-vtt.com/ is one of the more popular ones.

I started DMing on Roll20, so it will always have a special place in my heart for that, however their development team is absolute garbage. I dont know what they do with all the money they make, but it sure as hell isnt spent on development. That being said, you can make do decently with what they have, and the ability to just purchase modules and go is certainly nice.

My 2 cents! Take it FWIW and happy DMing!

Thanks Wayfarer, appreciate it. I've used Roll20 and I've used Fantasy Grounds. Have lots of money invested into FG, but I'm always looking for that next great tool. I'm going to pick up Foundry and give it a whirl. Thanks for all the feedback.

New thing!

Two of the encounters, all 8 maps and the concept / introduction letter for the "Librarian" are mine

(...i *might* have been cajouled into doing a lil' bit of bad voice acting in the trailer too!)

"Read the correspondence between the Librarian and the Peddler, the individuals affected by the incomprehensible powers that lurk in the depths of the ocean and in the darkness behind the bright stars. Listen to their tales of cosmic horror whether you heed their warnings or follow in their footsteps.

Tales From the World's End is a collection of horror encounters suited for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd tiers of play. The title includes:

Sixteen terrifying encounters (four available for preview).
Eighteen letters written by the Librarian and the Peddler.
Fifteen new monsters.
New magic items.
Original art and cartography.
And More!
All of these are beautifully laid out on 87 pages. A printer-friendly version is included for your convenience."

Your voice work is not bad!

From the Silly Purchase of the Month thread.

Mixolyde wrote:

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/5zwqQpb.jpg)

I will probably never get to actually play it, but I don't care because the book is gorgeous and I love John Harper.