Occupy Wall Street. Police vs people in NY.

ATM reimbursement is a huge plus. Many banks and CUs are catching on.

I use Navy Federal Credit Union. They seem to be everywhere I am across the world and they have treated me well for 13 years. Absolutely no complaints.

McChuck: Here are some good sites to help you find a credit union.

http://www.nerdwallet.com/credit-union/
http://lifehacker.com/5857091/how-do...

And now the news.

More news about the supression and intimidation of the media. The New York Times Has Had It with the NYPD Blocking its Photographers [The Atlantic Wire]

Occupy the Boardroom take on Verizon [Occupy the Boardroom]

In the last 90 days, 5.6 million Americans have switched banks.

Bill Moyers and John Reed on Big Banks' Power and Influence

Police evict Occupy Buffalo

At daybreak, the grassy outlines where tents stood and a cluster of flags fluttering in the wind were all that remained of the Occupy Buffalo encampment on a quadrant of Niagara Square that began October 8.

Hours earlier, a police descended, and after a brief warning, they tossed 17 tents and the contents into a top trailer and arrested 10 protesters who refused an order to cross the street.

More here.

City of Chapel Hill Apologizes, Sort of

Town council says sorry to Raleigh News & Observer for arresting, handcuffing and placing reporter Katelyn Ferral facedown on pavement; doesn't apologize for SWAT-style response to Occupy Chapel Hill's non-violent occupation of building that had been vacant for ten years.

More here.

The New York Times fired off another letter to the Police Department today on behalf of 13 New York-based news organizations about police treatment of the press over the last several months.

Occupy Tulsa protesters reject plea deal

Occupy Tulsa supporters who were arrested in November on park curfew violations appeared in court Tuesday to reject the city's plea deal and vow to fight on.

More here.

Occupy Oakland: 12 barred from City Hall

Police confiscated my journalist's friend's video camera and deleted his video. Being the smart guy he is, he recovered parts of the video. Here is more from the eviction of Occupy Miami.


According to the consulting firm cg42, the nation’s 10 biggest banks could lose as much as $185 billion in deposits this year due to customer defections. Of those banks, “Bank of America is the most vulnerable and could lose up to 10% of its customers and $42 billion in consumer deposits.” (HT: Business Insider)

I know that sentence says "could" lose but still those are huge numbers. Earlier when discussing the bank transfers people commented on how the hundreds of thousands of accounts that moved were still drops in the ocean of the banking world. $185 billion is quite a big drop.

Thanks for the advice, everyone. Thanks for the links, Edwin.

One of our new EVPs is personable with the CEO of B of A, and he......umm. well let's say he's excited he doesn't work for B of A.

I should point out that "losing 185 billion in deposits" doesn't really matter much. The big banks are capitalized enough and spreads on deposits are low enough that they're almost a liability. At least, till the Fed raises rates, which won't be till 2014 at the absolute earliest.


The Oakland Police Department tried their best to keep certain things from being filmed, like close-ups of them assaulting peaceful protesters, they missed this one.

As kettled activists beg the Oakland Police to please issue a dispersal order so that they can leave, batons come out swinging for no apparent reason and allegedly someone's grandmother is struck. Shocked occupiers tell police that they've hurt a grandmother, and one man is even on his knees begging for a dispersal order. Again, for no apparent reason, an officer grabs a young black man at the front of the crowd by his ears and drags him away.


However, the female cop, who appears to be a high-ranking major, committed a major blunder when she stopped me on the sidewalk and had me arrested after letting several other journalists walk past her.

The recovered video is not perfectly in sequence. There are some clips missing. But it’s enough to show what happened in the moments leading up to my arrest.

It shows that police had already fallen out of their military formation, which they had been in all night as they dispersed the activists. The operation was pretty much over.

AT :23 seconds into the video, you will seen a group of Miami-Dade cops walking past me, ensuring that all the activists had been dispersed. None appeared concerned with presence.

At :37 seconds into the video, you will see a television cameraman dressed in blue standing on the sidewalk. I believe he is the one who recorded my arrest. I need to figure out who he works for because I have not seen that footage.

At :39, you will see a television cameraman in white shorts and blue shirt stepping up on the sidewalk after having recorded a close-up of the cops marching back.

At :43, you will see Miami Herald reporter Glenn Garvin in a white beard and glasses talking on the phone as he walks toward me on the sidewalk. He also witnessed my arrest, but did not know my name. He mentioned it in the fifth paragraph of this story.

At :47, you will see the female officer who had me arrested. She had just allowed the above-mentioned videographer in white shorts walk past her without stopping him. You will also see two more television news videographers behind her.

At :51, you will also see another television news videographer crouching down behind her video recording the marching cops from a low angle.

At :51, you will also see her step in front of me to detain me.

I explained to her that I was walking back to my car.

She said, “No, it doesn’t work that way,” and began calling other officers to have me arrested.

More here.

Edwin wrote:
As kettled activists beg the Oakland Police to please issue a dispersal order so that they can leave, batons come out swinging for no apparent reason and allegedly someone's grandmother is struck. Shocked occupiers tell police that they've hurt a grandmother, and one man is even on his knees begging for a dispersal order. Again, for no apparent reason, an officer grabs a young black man at the front of the crowd by his ears and drags him away.

I think that the first cop to lunge is going after the camera. If you listen carefully, you might even hear something like "Give me that..."

Grumpicus wrote:
Edwin wrote:
As kettled activists beg the Oakland Police to please issue a dispersal order so that they can leave, batons come out swinging for no apparent reason and allegedly someone's grandmother is struck. Shocked occupiers tell police that they've hurt a grandmother, and one man is even on his knees begging for a dispersal order. Again, for no apparent reason, an officer grabs a young black man at the front of the crowd by his ears and drags him away.

I think that the first cop to lunge is going after the camera. If you listen carefully, you might even hear something like "Give me that..."

She called him a 39, I wonder what that means. I'm guessing something like "fake Journalist".

Yonder wrote:
Grumpicus wrote:
Edwin wrote:
As kettled activists beg the Oakland Police to please issue a dispersal order so that they can leave, batons come out swinging for no apparent reason and allegedly someone's grandmother is struck. Shocked occupiers tell police that they've hurt a grandmother, and one man is even on his knees begging for a dispersal order. Again, for no apparent reason, an officer grabs a young black man at the front of the crowd by his ears and drags him away.

I think that the first cop to lunge is going after the camera. If you listen carefully, you might even hear something like "Give me that..."

She called him a 39, I wonder what that means. I'm guessing something like "fake Journalist".

Sorry if I caused confusion; I was referring to the first video.

Black Bloc: The Cancer in Occupy Truth-Out

Black Bloc adherents detest those of us on the organized left and seek, quite consciously, to take away our tools of empowerment. They confuse acts of petty vandalism and a repellent cynicism with revolution. The real enemies, they argue, are not the corporate capitalists, but their collaborators among the unions, workers’ movements, radical intellectuals, environmental activists and populist movements such as the Zapatistas. Any group that seeks to rebuild social structures, especially through nonviolent acts of civil disobedience, rather than physically destroy, becomes, in the eyes of Black Bloc anarchists, the enemy. Black Bloc anarchists spend most of their fury not on the architects of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) or globalism, but on those, such as the Zapatistas, who respond to the problem. It is a grotesque inversion of value systems.

Because Black Bloc anarchists do not believe in organization, indeed oppose all organized movements, they ensure their own powerlessness. They can only be obstructionist. And they are primarily obstructionist to those who resist. John Zerzan, one of the principal ideologues of the Black Bloc movement in the United States, defended “Industrial Society and Its Future,” the rambling manifesto by Theodore Kaczynski, known as the Unabomber, although he did not endorse Kaczynski’s bombings. Zerzan is a fierce critic of a long list of supposed sellouts starting with Noam Chomsky. Black Bloc anarchists are an example of what Theodore Roszak in “The Making of a Counter Culture” called the “progressive adolescentization” of the American left.

Some of the independent media that have been covering Occupy since the beginning with long term views agree with this analysis, from what I am seeing of their writings. Some of us here mention the same thing.

Thanks for that, Edwin. Good read. This goes back to something a few of us have said before. The distinct lack of leadership and the antipathy towards having the movement be more organized is why something like this can happen. Mic checks and heat checks won't allow you to make hard decisions on saying that some faction can't participate because they're harming the overall movement.

Oregon Republican Wants to Outlaw Online Organizing [The Stranger]

(2) A person commits the crime of aggravated solicitation if, with the intent of causing two or more other persons to engage in specific conduct constituting a crime, the person uses an electronic communication to command or solicit other persons to engage in that conduct at a specific time and at a specific location.
(3) In a prosecution under this section, the state need not prove that the electronic communication was received by specific persons or that the defendant intended for specific persons to engage in the criminal activity.

Westboro Church threatens to picket Powell boys' funeral as anti-gay protest [The News Tribune]. Occupy Seattle will be there trying to block them much like other groups have in the past.

Anonymous exposes e-mails of Syrian presidential aides [ArsTechnica]

Jaafari suggested comparing what was happening in Syria to US law enforcement's response to the Occupy Wall Street protests.

I thought this would be appropriate to link, Occupy Cleveland.

Full video of the Dec 16 port shutdown in Seattle was released.


  • Viewpoint: V for Vendetta and the rise of Anonymous [BBC News] It's an op-ed written by Alan Moore
  • Occupy Y'All Street: Occupy Charlotte Activist Gambles Everything On The Movement [Huffington Post]
  • Occupy DC Evicted From a Winter of Communal Discontent [Wired Magazine]
  • Sarah Palin and Occupy Could Be Friends [Crooks and Liars] That was an unexpected title and article.
  • Occupy Seattle protests incinerator [Seattle PI]

I don't endorse the Black Bloc's tactics, but I understand their political stance. Ultimately any new system of power is going to run into problems, the same as happened with capitalism and the US government. I can appreciate their resistance to organization in that theoretical light, even if I note the social organization that they currently use and would hope for in the future.

I'll just leave this here as an example of why OWS is losing steam. My oh my.

I think OWS has been good at raising the issues surrounding problems in society.. However, out of that, actual, focused groups need to arise. The above stuff is just too wishy-washy.

Yes, I know there are probably a dozen different threads where I could post this but I felt that this one most had the correct tone.

6 Things Rich People Need to Stop Saying

A little bit of news on the topic; I figured it was worth sharing:

The University of California has reached a $1m (£62,000) settlement with demonstrators who were pepper-sprayed during an Occupy protest last year.

The college will pay $30,000 to 21 complainants each, with $250,000 for their lawyers, according to an agreement filed in a Sacramento court.

Well, that's a minor victory at least. Maybe it'll give pause to other organizations before they go slap-happy with unreasonable treatment of peaceful protestors.

I'm surprised to see no mention here of the 1 year anniversary.

Also, pictures.

EDIT: Forgot to respond to the above

It is nice to see some sort of repercussion to police overreactions. It's been a while since I had looked into it, but were there any more direct repercussions for the involved officers (suspension, fines, job termination, etc)?

WipEout wrote:
I'm surprised to see no mention here of the 1 year anniversary.

I saw some people from Occupy Wall Street on Chris Hayes' weekend show and am sympathetic to the general anti-Wall Street idea, but other than giving us the 1% meme, did all that protesting accomplish anything? I'm open to hearing that things have changed, but reading financial bloggers I'm not getting the sense that the big banks have changed a single aspect of their business strategies.

Funkenpants wrote:
WipEout wrote:
I'm surprised to see no mention here of the 1 year anniversary.

I saw some people from Occupy Wall Street on Chris Hayes' weekend show and am sympathetic to the general anti-Wall Street idea, but other than giving us the 1% meme, did all that protesting accomplish anything? I'm open to hearing that things have changed, but reading financial bloggers I'm not getting the sense that the big banks have changed a single aspect of their business strategies.

Hard to say. In a sense, they did change the political rhetoric around money - prior to Occupy, the discussion was about debt, and being framed in a very pro-wealthy interests fashion.

Tanglebones wrote:
Funkenpants wrote:
WipEout wrote:
I'm surprised to see no mention here of the 1 year anniversary.

I saw some people from Occupy Wall Street on Chris Hayes' weekend show and am sympathetic to the general anti-Wall Street idea, but other than giving us the 1% meme, did all that protesting accomplish anything? I'm open to hearing that things have changed, but reading financial bloggers I'm not getting the sense that the big banks have changed a single aspect of their business strategies.

Hard to say. In a sense, they did change the political rhetoric around money - prior to Occupy, the discussion was about debt, and being framed in a very pro-wealthy interests fashion.

A fairly large number of people switched over to credit unions too. And I haven't followed up on that but would not be surprised if the general rate of conversion is higher now, thanks in no part to the changed political dialogue.

CheezePavilion wrote:
A little bit of news on the topic; I figured it was worth sharing:

The University of California has reached a $1m (£62,000) settlement with demonstrators who were pepper-sprayed during an Occupy protest last year.

The college will pay $30,000 to 21 complainants each, with $250,000 for their lawyers, according to an agreement filed in a Sacramento court.

My wife cynically responded "So they paid them back one year of tuition money?"

I think the best thing to come out of occupy was to bring the whole situation into the general consciousness and to generate valuable discussion - even if the movement itself was doomed from the start.

Duoae wrote:
I think the best thing to come out of occupy was to bring the whole situation into the general consciousness and to generate valuable discussion - even if the movement itself was doomed from the start.

Well, what were they going to realistically do? It's one thing to topple a regime in a banana republic. It's another to do it in the most well armed and organized banana republic.

It's also interesting how quickly the fact that the police, in the United States, will beat the f*ck out of peaceful protestors, has receded from public awareness. Everything's Just Fine(tm).