A good read: Stuxnet

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/201...

8 reasonably dense pages about discovering and interpreting what's probably the biggest use of a cyber-weapon to date.

I read this a few days ago and really enjoyed it. Solid read.

The only reason I won't call it a page-turner is that I read it all in a single-page view Definitely a fantastic read.

Fascinated me. I really hope we learn the rest of the story someday.

Yeah, this was a great article. Cloak and dagger sh*t for sure. I knew a lot of this already, but it did a great job of filling in details and talking about the folks involved in figuring out what the heck was going on.

I've seen people actually claim that a non-state actor could have created Stuxnet; in my opinion, knowing what we know, making that argument indicates either ignorance or stupidity. Stuxnet is most emphatically a weapon, designed by professionals. There's never been anything quite like it.

I gather heads rolled in the IT departments at Natanz and Bushehr, perhaps quite literally, and it makes me sad. Stopping something like that would take a level of incredible paranoia, and IT people are almost never given enough power to make a network truly secure. That could have been defended against, but systems that were resilient against Stuxnet would have been extremely inconvenient for daily use. So I'm sure the IT people weren't allowed to do anything of the sort (if it even occurred to them that it would be a good idea), and yet they're still being held responsible for the results. Typical management bullsh*t; ignore expert subordinates, and then punish them when your project fails.

That's one thing that, in retrospect, really amazes me about the US in the 50s and 60s, when running their super-advanced weapons programs... by and large, they were remarkably well-managed, run by truly competent people. You just don't see that in government anymore; you hardly see it anywhere.

It's now something to add to the threat profile if you're trying to run security in an installation that a foreign government might not like. This is not the last time we'll see something like this, and controversial programs of any sort are going to need vastly higher security.

Wikileaks in particular should be extraordinarily careful.

Saw a TED talk on this a little while back but this article fills in lots of details. Absolutely fascinating stuff.

RE: page 5, paragraph 2 - Who names their group:
The

T hreat
I ntelligence
T eam

?

ok, I'm gonna go because I have nothing to add here.

mrtomaytohead wrote:

RE: page 5, paragraph 2 - Who names their group:
The

T hreat
I ntelligence
T eam

?

ok, I'm gonna go because I have nothing to add here.

He who shall never know the touch of a real woman.

that article read like a damn mystery thriller. Great stuff.

It still ongoing too, seeing as Israel are still assassinating Iranian nuclear scientists within the last week, and Iran recently said they had to replace all their centrifuge systems to sort out their problems.

Scratched wrote:

It still ongoing too, seeing as Israel are still assassinating Iranian nuclear scientists within the last week, and Iran recently said they had to replace all their centrifuge systems to sort out their problems.

Source?